Robert Gutowski Architects designs minimal church interior in response to changes in modern worship



The Church of Pope John Paul II in Páty, Hungary, by Robert Gutowski Architects


© Provided by Dezeen
The Church of Pope John Paul II in Páty, Hungary, by Robert Gutowski Architects

The Church of Pope John Paul II in Páty, Hungary, is a crescent-shaped building featuring skewed angles and whitewashed concrete that aims to turn “passive observers” into active participants of worship.

Local practice Robert Gutowski Architects filled the church in the village of Páty in Budapest with modern takes on traditional aspects of Medieval, ecclesiastical architecture.

The intention was to shift the emphasis towards the altar and the congregation to make the act of worship more engaging.



a herd of sheep in a city: The Church of Pope John Paul II features an elliptical layout


© Provided by Dezeen
The Church of Pope John Paul II features an elliptical layout

Traditional churches typically have a rectangular floor plan and are made up of a nave – the central part of the church – and an apse – the semicircular or polygonal area at the end of the aisle, usually located behind the altar.

The Church of Pope John Paul II, however, has an elliptical layout, made up of the crescent-shaped building of worship that wraps around an adjoining oval-shaped outdoor space.

Therefore what would typically be the nave of a conventional church functions as the churchyard or garden, while the liturgical space is situated where the apse would be.



a wooden bench sitting in the middle of a room: The church interior features whitewashed reinforced concrete ceilings and walls


© Provided by Dezeen
The church interior features whitewashed reinforced concrete ceilings and walls

As studio founder Robert Gutowski explains, this layout was designed to place more emphasis on the communal experience of the Eucharist and to “invite people closer to the holy act” at the altar.

“If you like, we invite people into the apse, surrounding the altar, forming a community,” the architect explained. “It is also similar to the liturgy of early times, when Paleochristians simply surrounded a table in their own home – what is known as Domus Ecclesiae.”



a view of a box: The design aims to place more emphasis on the Eucharist and the altar


© Provided by Dezeen
The design aims to place more emphasis on the Eucharist and the altar

“The church clearly defines its purpose: while the Creator and the almighty God are at the centre of traditional liturgy, modern liturgical efforts have shifted emphasis to the recreator God, the image of a perpetually redeeming Christ,” Gutowski added.

“The Church of Pope John Paul II represents a conscious response to liturgical changes in recent decades, rendering it a model church experiment in contemporary church architecture,” he continued.

“Emphasis is shifted toward the active involvement of worshippers.The community is not a passive observer of events in a sanctuary, but rather actively experiences the holy act.”



a room with a brick building: The church building itself has a crescent-like shape


© Provided by Dezeen
The church building itself has a crescent-like shape

Several rooms lead off of the central, liturgical space, including a communal room, a service room and an office on the ground floor, and an educational room, guest room, the priest’s living quarters, and access to the bell tower on the first floor.

Each of these rooms are enclosed in one, whole elliptical floor plan – a form chosen to symbolise “perpetuity” and to create a holistic space.

“The concept is that when we say

Read more

Man says Airbnb home decorated with ‘devil worship’ decor ‘made the entire family feel unsafe’

Halloween came early for one family who claims they were driven from their Airbnb rental home by symbols of witchcraft and satanism.

New York City author Frederick Joseph detailed the short-lived rental experience in a Tuesday Twitter thread. He paid $1,150 for two nights at the two-bedroom home for himself, his fiancée, his 21-year-old cousin and his 8-year-old brother. But the family encountered “seemingly satanic items and stuff for witchcraft rituals” when they arrived, Joseph tweeted.

The owner had listed the Spring Glen, N.Y. rental as a two-bedroom getaway with a “Scandinavian vibe,” but Joseph says the decor was unexpected.

“I went inside the home alone to check it out and I noticed there were no blinds on any of the windows,” he tells Yahoo Life. “You could see into the home from any angle.”

Joseph said he ventured into the basement only because its staircase greeted him at the front door. There, he discovered “animal skulls and ritualistic floor markings” along with shattered glass. The markings, he said, led to a door that opened to a bathtub outside that was surrounded by unlit candles.

Once upstairs, Joseph found photos, candles and books seemingly dedicated to rituals. The collection, he says, “looked like devil worship” along with demon-like trinkets and a clear bag containing what looked like a headless taxidermy bird.

“At this point, we said f**k this, we are out of here,” Joseph tells Yahoo Life. During multiple correspondences with Airbnb, it was conveyed to Joseph that the owner offered to remove any items that made his family uncomfortable. However, Joseph declined.

“Needless to say, we left because we are Black and not dealing with something that was: 1. advertised completely different 2. Looks like a scene from [the horror film] Hereditary 3. Made the entire family feel unsafe,” he tweeted.

“Black people have been through certain traumas, both historically and currently, [involving situations] that might generate less apprehension

Read more