White House reportedly wonders about meds affecting Trump’s behavior

When Donald Trump announced yesterday afternoon that he was ending all negotiations on an economic aid package, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) happened to be leading a conference call with her Democratic conference. Alerting House members to the presidential declaration, Pelosi voiced concerns about whether his medications were affecting his judgment.

Evidently, the Speaker isn’t the only one raising the question. The New York Times reported overnight:

Some White House staff members wondered whether Mr. Trump’s behavior was spurred by a cocktail of drugs he has been taking to treat the coronavirus, including dexamethasone, a steroid that can cause mood swings and can give a false level of energy and a sense of euphoria.

It was against this backdrop that Rachel spoke on the show last night with Dr. Robert Wachter, the chair of the department of medicine at UC San Francisco, who explained that the medication the president is on can cause mood swings — as can COVID itself, especially among the elderly.

“For a 74-year-old man to have COVID, symptomatic COVID, low blood oxygen, which can alter your thinking, and be on dexamethasone raises the possibility that his thinking is altered, his judgment is altered from the medications,” Wachter said. “And part of the problem is if he is one responsible for figuring out whether he’s capable of thinking clearly, that’s not a good plan.”

The physician added, “I would say of the hundreds and hundreds of patients I’ve taken care who have altered thinking, it’s not at all infrequent that they have no idea. It’s one of these things that happens. They lose insight. They are unable to tell they have a problem. It’s the folks around them that can tell that. I can’t say for sure that there’s a problem here, but it certainly is possible given the medications, the low blood oxygen and the infections itself.”

But in the same interview, Wachter conceded that part of the challenge in the diagnosis is having a sense of a patient’s “baseline personality,” which can serve as the basis for a comparison to determine whether he or she is acting erratically. And that’s the point I find myself stuck on as it relates to Trump.

To be sure, yesterday was a head-spinning day for those watching the president. He appeared to be acting recklessly, tweeting strange messages at a manic pace, and making policy pronouncements that were counter to his own interests. Given his behavior, it was hardly surprising that some, including White House officials, started wondering about Trump’s health and the effects of his ailment and treatments.

But all of this comes with a caveat: we’ve confronted similar questions about Trump’s erraticism last week, last month, and last year. And the year before that. And the year before that.

What does it say about a president when people struggle to tell the difference between his usual persona and the one he displays while on potentially mood-altering medications?

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A splash of paint can work wonders in the kitchen | Central Western Daily

life-style, life, deals, discounts, coupons, Annie Sloan, chalk paint

We often hear about how transformative paint can be to a house, but this kitchen makeover takes the cake. The room only has one window – which doesn’t provide much natural light – and the dark cupboards sucked any brightness out of the room. The owners had just a small budget to bring the heart of their home back to life, so using paint to overhaul the dark 1980s timber cabinetry was a clever and economical approach. Luckily, they didn’t need new appliances, fixtures or flooring, so instead read every article they could about painting kitchen cupboards and boldly decided to go for it. They opted for Annie Sloan’s Chalk Paint; two coats of a shade called Pure were used on the upper cabinets, and the same amount in the colour Duck Egg Blue was applied to the lower cupboards. The owners have invaluable tips for those who decide to use paint for their kitchen makeover. “Degrease your cabinets thoroughly with a degreasing soap. If you leave just a tiny spot it will show through the paint. “Approach your kitchen remodel with realistic expectations. When you get really, really close and examine the cabinets, they do have some imperfections, but whoever gets that close? We love our kitchen now. It’s bright and colourful and full of light. “If you’re considering using Chalk Paint, but you’re afraid of the results, just do it! It’s the most affordable way to dramatically change the look and feel of your kitchen.” With DIY at the top of many people’s recipe list, these steps show how simple it is to whip up a masterpiece. “With a partner and no interruptions, you could do your kitchen cabinets in a weekend,” suggests Annie. “Or if the thought of a big job is overwhelming, break it down. Do your top cupboards one week and your bottom cupboards the next.” Without the need to sand or prep, Chalk Paint can not only elevate cabinetry, but also turn everyday tiles into a showstopping feature in your kitchen. “Rectangular subway tiles can be bought anywhere, for next to nothing,” says Annie. “Turn them on their side, paint each half in a complementary shade and you’ve got a gorgeously matte checkerboard tile that looks like you paid ten times the price. Pick a palette of four shades – two per tile – for a seriously chic look.” Just remember, patience is a tile painter’s best friend. For a polished look, use thin coats and leave plenty of drying time. If you’re a fan of the rustic aesthetic, leave a little more paint on the brush. Layer up the texture of the surrounding wall by applying Annie Sloan’s Chalk Paint onto a base of Wall Paint, using thick strips of cardboard. Drag, wipe and scrape the paint along the wall, building up layers of colour and tone, until blended to your liking. Once dry, Annie suggests finishing the tiles with a thin layer of

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‘Getting home does wonders for your creative brain’ – meet the Irish interior stars designing homes and hotels across the globe

It’s not paradise, we definitely have our moments,” laughs Bryan O’Sullivan, referring to his marriage and working relationship to husband James O’Neill who is also commercial director at his studio BOS Studio, in London.

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