Will Karen Handel take back the House seat she won in 2017 and lost in 2018?

Georgia’s 6th Congressional District has seen one of the hardest turns left of any House seat during Donald Trump’s presidency.



Karen Handel et al. standing next to a knife


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Longtime GOP Rep. Tom Price easily won reelection in 2016 before being plucked as Trump’s Health and Human Services secretary in what turned out to be a short-term gig. A June 2017 special election to replace Price ended in victory for Republican Karen Handel, a businesswoman who was once the deputy chief of staff to second lady Marilyn Quayle.

But Handel’s House tenure was short. She lost 18 months later to Democratic challenger and gun control activist Lucy McBath, the mother of Jordan Davis, who at 17 was shot and killed following an argument at a gas station in Florida about loud music.

Now, Handel is seeking a rematch in a district that includes many of Atlanta’s affluent northern suburbs, once a GOP stronghold. The area was once represented by House Speaker Newt Gingrich and Rep. Johnny Isakson, who later became a senator. But like the state of Georgia, the district is now much more mixed politically, with an influx of professional-class workers, immigrants, and retirees from the Northeast and elsewhere who once flocked to Florida.

The campaign of Joe Biden, the Democratic presidential nominee, is heavily targeting the district, as are two Democratic Senate candidates in search of swing voters. That’s all likely to help McBath as she tries to prove she’s not a one-term wonder in Congress.

Officials with the House Republicans’ campaign arm aren’t particularly enthusiastic about Handel’s comeback bid, but they’re backing her as the GOP nominee. Handel’s views on social issues are deemed too conservative for the district. However, she does have name recognition, having been Georgia’s secretary of state from 2007 to 2010 before pursuing a gubernatorial bid, which she lost.

Tags: News, Campaign 2020, 2020 Elections, Campaigns, Karen Handel, Georgia, Congress, Republican Party

Original Author: David Mark

Original Location: Will Karen Handel take back the House seat she won in 2017 and lost in 2018?

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Democrats Narrow Gap in Washington District Trump Won by 7 Points Amid Push to Expand House Seats

As Democrats look to push House Republicans further into the minority, the Democratic challenger in a Washington state House race has narrowed her deficit against the Republican incumbent to make it a virtual neck-and-neck contest, according to an internal Democratic poll provided to Newsweek.

Despite President Donald Trump winning Washington state’s 3rd Congressional District in 2016 by more than seven points, Democrat Carolyn Long is trailing Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-Wa.) by just two points, within the survey’s margin of error. In 2018, Herrera Beutler bested Long by roughly 16,400 votes, or 5.4 percent, and is serving her fifth term.

Long is one of 37 candidates that House Democrats hope will help them expand their majority in the lower chamber.

The poll, conducted by the progressive firm GQR, shows Long at 47 percent and Herrera Beutler at 49 percent. Four percent of voters in the longtime Republican district, which is located in the southwest region of the state, remain undecided.

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Abby Olmstead, Long’s campaign manager, said of the race, “the stakes have never been higher.”

Olmstead said the choice between the candidates is clear.

“In 2020, we face the choice between reelecting a career politician who has spent a decade staying silent, who is never available to her constituents and who is continuously working with Trump to dismantle access to healthcare,” Olmstead said. “Or Carolyn—who will be a hard-working, present, accountable, representative that always puts the people of Southwest Washington first.”

Democrat Carolyn Long
A new internal poll by Democrats shows challenger Carolyn Long, a Democrat, trailing the Republican incumbent for Washington state’s 3rd Congressional District, Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler by two points.
Courtesy of the Carolyn Long campaign

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Long enjoys a net +11 favorability rating, compared to Herrera Beutler’s net +5 rating. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is nearly tied with Trump in the district: 47 percent to 48 percent, with 6 percent undecided. A separate poll conducted last month showed Long was four points down.

The Herrera Beutler campaign questioned the legitimacy of the poll and accused Long of being “desperate.”

“This is the time of year when desperate campaigns try to convince reporters to write about outlying polls from outlying pollsters with outlying results,” spokesperson Parker Truax told Newsweek in a statement. “Jaime is going to win.”

The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) also questioned the poll’s credibility and said Democrats’ spending habits in the district conflict with their suggestion that the race is virtually tied.

“If Carolyn Long were only down two points, the Democrats would be spending here like it’s nobody’s business,” NRCC spokesperson Torunn Sinclair told Newsweek in a statement. “They’re not, they currently have no money reserved, this is a fake poll and Carolyn Long is going to lose again.”

Herrera Beutler’s campaign did not respond to Newsweek‘s request for comment.

Though the internal polling suggests a public shift toward Long, election forecasters aren’t buying it.

Cook Political Report still rates the contest as likely Republican,

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Democrats Close to Flipping Virginia House District Trump Won by 11 Points, Internal Poll Shows

One point.

That is how much Democrat Dr. Cameron Webb, is trailing Republican Bob Good, a self-described “biblical conservative,” for Virginia’s open 5th Congressional District, according to an internal Democratic poll provided to Newsweek.

The survey suggests that the district, currently held by Republican Rep. Denver Riggleman, who was endorsed by President Donald Trump but was ousted by his party during a June nominating convention after he officiated a same-sex wedding, is becoming increasingly in play for Democrats. Despite Trump winning the district, which stretches from the North Carolina border nearly to Washington, D.C., by 11 points in 2016, Dr. Webb has continued to close his gap with Good.

Riggleman’s ouster for the more conservative Good, who is a former athletics official at Jerry Falwell Jr.’s Liberty University, weakened the chances that a Republican would maintain control of the district, according to election forecasters. However, analysts like Inside Elections, the Cook Political Report and Sabato’s Crystal Ball still rate the race as “leans Republican.”

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Dr. Webb is one of 34 candidates that House Democrats are looking to help them increase their majority in the lower chamber.

The internal poll was conducted by the Democratic firm Global Strategy Group for 314 Action, an organization that’s committed to electing scientists and STEM professionals to elected office. It showed 46 percent of likely voters backing Dr. Webb while 47 percent went for Good. The survey was conducted among 400 likely general election voters between September 10-14, and has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.9 percent.

Dr. Webb is now within one point of Good thanks to a five-point gain since August, per 314 Action’s internal polling. By comparison, Riggleman cruised to re-election in 2018, beating his Democratic opponent by seven points.

Cameron Webb
Democratic congressional candidate for Virginia’s 5th District, Dr. Cameron Webb, is seen here teaching in 2019. A new internal poll provided to Newsweek shows Dr. Webb trailing his GOP opponent, Bob Good, by a singular point.
Courtesy of the Webb Campaign

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“Cameron’s background, taken in its entirety, is very impactful to voters right now,” Mia Ehrenberg, Dr. Webb’s communications director, told Newsweek.

Dr. Webb, who practices general internal medicine in Charlottesville and teaches at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, held brief White House stints under both Barack Obama and Donald Trump, dealing with health care policy and economic development. He worked on Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Initiative during the final six months of Obama’s tenure, and on prescription drug prices for the first eight months of Trump’s presidency.

The Good campaign did not respond to Newsweek‘s request for comment as of the time of publication. This story will be updated if a response is received.

Both candidates’ familiarity among constituents has jumped in the last month. Sixty percent indicated in the poll that they’re now familiar with Dr. Webb while 63 percent are familiar with Good.

In terms of favorability, Good still trailed Dr. Webb.

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