Thumbs: ‘Used Mexicans,’ Willie lit at White House, Big Tex’s face-diaper

[Thumbs up] Big Tex is 55 feet tall and made of steel and silicone, but even he’s not a big enough dummy to spurn a mask during the pandemic. The iconic animatronic statue that greets visitors at Dallas’ Fair Park is sporting the protective gear this year — emblazoned with his “howdy folks!” catchphrase, of course — to spread the word on the importance of face coverings. “All Texans are being asked to do the same and he is standing in solidarity with all of us,” State Fair of Texas spokeswoman Karissa Condoianis said in a statement. Unsurprisingly, some conservative activists are decrying the move as “virtue signaling,” “stupid” and they’re shaming Big Texas for his “face diaper,” according to the Dallas Morning News. This vocal minority, which equates life-saving face masks with communist tyranny, is precisely why we need a wiser, more evolved Texan to step in.

[Thumbs up] Speaking of 55-feet high Texas icons, Willie Nelson did indeed smoke weed on the White House roof, according to President Jimmy Carter, who recently confirmed the singer’s claims from his 1998 autobiography. Speaking in the new documentary “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President,” the former POTUS did Willie one better and revealed the identity of the red-headed stranger’s pot-smoking compadre as Chip Carter, one of the president’s sons. With all the D.C. malfeasance, even back in 1980, Willie and Chip’s stoner adventure seems quaint. It’s sad, though, that we’ve gone from a world where the president’s son hangs out with a gifted American songwriter and music legend to one where Don Jr. pals around with, well, Kid Rock. Ain’t it funny how time slips away?

[Thumbs twiddled] Willie was years ahead in his weedy ways, but the Texas Legislature may soon be catching up. Several Democratic candidates we spoke with recently mentioned legalizing pot as a possible revenue generator to shore up the state’s budget shortfall, a big jump from Texas’ restrictive existing medical marijuana program. But it’s not just Democrats who are rethinking pot. After touring an Austin-area grow facility, Republican Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller said he was all for expanded medicinal use. “If it’ll help somebody, I’m for it. Whatever it is. I mean, a toothache, I don’t care,” he said. Granted, Democrats could do better than the scandal-prone commissioner who once inspired the Chronicle editorial “How long will Texans have to tolerate Sid Miller?” but you have to start your bipartisan support rolling somewhere. Meet you at the top of the Capitol dome, Sid. We’ll leave the lantern on.

[Thumbs up] On to a different kind of smoking, as Texas Monthly reports that an Austin-based company is working on a lab-grown brisket. Hold on, before we grab the pitchforks let’s hear them out. Apparently, BioBQ founders Katie Kam and Janet Zoldan respect the complexity of a good brisket and set a high bar on purpose. “It seemed like a great, challenging meat to demonstrate this technology working,” Kam said, adding that if you can design brisket

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Jimmy Carter says his son smoked pot with Willie Nelson on White House roof



Willie Nelson looking at the camera: Jimmy Carter says his son smoked pot with Willie Nelson on White House roof


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Jimmy Carter says his son smoked pot with Willie Nelson on White House roof

Former President Jimmy Carter reveals in a new documentary that his son James Earl “Chip” Carter sat on the roof of the White House and smoked marijuana with country music legend Willie Nelson.

People magazine reports that Carter made the admission in a new documentary, “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President.” Carter confirmed the anecdote described in Nelson’s autobiography, though Nelson had hid the identity of Carter’s son in the book in which he referred to his companion as a “servant” in the White House.

“When Willie Nelson wrote his autobiography, he confessed that he smoked pot in the White House one night when he was spending the night with me,” Carter says, according to People. “And he says that his companion that shared the pot with him was one of the servants in the White House. That is not exactly true – it actually was one of my sons, which he didn’t want to categorize as a pot-smoker like him.”

Carter famously made political alliances with many well-known musicians during his White House tenure, including Nelson and the Allman Brothers. In the documentary, he reportedly also dismissed criticism of his meetings with musical groups, pointing to the influence such groups had over their fans.

“I was doing what I really believed, and the response I think from the followers of those musicians was much more influential than the people who thought [of] that being inappropriate for a president,” Carter says, according to People.

Nelson is an outspoken advocate for left-leaning causes and in 2018 supported former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D) in his Senate bid against Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas).

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Jimmy Carter reveals Willie Nelson’s White House pot-smoking pal: ‘One of my sons’

Jimmy Carter has set the record straight about who joined Willie Nelson in smoking pot on the roof of the White House during Carter’s presidency.

It wasn’t a White House staffer member, it was one of Carter’s sons.

“When Willie Nelson wrote his autobiography, he confessed that he smoked pot in the White House one night when he was spending the night with me,” Carter, 95, says in the new documentary, “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President” released Friday, according to the Los Angeles Times.

“And he says that his companion that shared the pot with him was one of the servants in the White House. That is not exactly true — it actually was one of my sons, which he didn’t want to categorize as a pot-smoker like him.”

The documentary explores the Democrat’s relationships with several musicians, including Bob Dylan and the Allman Brothers, during his time in the White House, 1977-1981.

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Former President Jimmy Carter and country singer Willie Nelson. (Carter Presidential Library)

Former President Jimmy Carter and country singer Willie Nelson. (Carter Presidential Library)

“I was doing what I really believed, and the response I think from the followers of those musicians was much more influential than the people who thought [of] that being inappropriate for a president,” he said, according to the Times.

‘Big fat Austin torpedo’

In 2015, Carter’s son, James Earl “Chip” Carter III — now 70 years old — admitted to GQ that Nelson “told me not to ever tell anybody” about the incident involving what the “On the Road Again” singer has called a “big fat Austin torpedo.”

For the documentary, Carter III said he and Nelson headed upstairs during a break while the singer had been jamming at the White House in the summer of 1980, according to the New York Post.

“I said, ‘Let’s go upstairs.’ We just kept going up ’til we got to the roof, where we leaned against the flagpole at the top of the place and lit one up,” he said. “If you know Washington, the White House is the hub of the spokes, the way it was designed. Most of the avenues run into the White House. You could sit up and could see all the traffic coming right at you. It’s a nice place up there.”

“We leaned against the flagpole at the top of the place and lit one up.”

— James Earl “Chip” Carter III, son of Jimmy Carter

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The other children of Carter and former first lady Rosalynn Carter are Jack Carter, 73; Donnel Carter, 68; and Amy Carter, 52.

The former president’s health has been ailing recently but he managed to make a virtual appearance to endorse Joe Biden for president last month.

Carter is the oldest living ex-president.

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Jimmy Carter is fully aware his son smoked with Willie Nelson on the White House roof


The top of many a Texan’s bucket list: Sharing a smoke with country icon (and profound marijuana fan) Willie Nelson.

Make it happen on the White House roof, and that’s the stuff of legend.

Former president Jimmy Carter talks about the time one of his sons had that exact experience in the new documentary about his presidency, “Jimmy Carter: Rock & Roll President.”

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According to the Los Angeles Time, Carter says in the film that Nelson “says that his companion that shared the pot with him was one of the servants at the White House. That is not exactly true. It actually was one of my sons.”

The documentary explores President Carter’s love of music and his friendship with several musicians during his term.



Country singers Willie Nelson and Charley Pride present a gold record to President Jimmy Carter at the Oval Office. (Photo by Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images) Photo: Wally McNamee/Corbis Via Getty Images

Photo: Wally McNamee/Corbis Via Getty Images


Country singers Willie Nelson and Charley Pride present a gold record to President Jimmy Carter at the Oval Office. (Photo by Wally McNamee/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images)


This isn’t the first time it’s been confirmed that James “Chip” Earl Carter III and Nelson shared “a big fat Austin torpedo” during Nelson’s visit to the White House in 1980. In a 2015 interview with GQ, when asked if it was Chip Carter that Nelson shared that legendary joint with, Nelson says; “Looked a lot like. Could have been, yeah.”




“Well, he told me not to ever tell anybody,” Chip Carter said in the same article.

Thankfully, President Carter doesn’t seem too upset about it, and Chip Carter remembers the episode well. During a break in Nelson’s performance, Chip Carter asked Nelson if he wanted to come upstairs.

“We just kept going up till we got to the roof, where we leaned against the flagpole at the top of the place and lit one up,” Chip Carter told the Los Angeles Times. “If you know Washington, the White House is the hub of the spokes — the way it was designed. Most of the avenues run into the White House. You could sit up and could see all the

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