10 Bathroom Waterproofing Mistakes To Avoid

I have seen countless cases of bad bathroom waterproofing, causing very costly waterproofing repairs and disruption to home owners. This problem is more common than people think, even in relatively new buildings as well as in existing homes when bathroom remodeling is being carried out. Bathroom waterproofing repair can mean major work because tiles, fixtures, floor tile bedding and so on need to come out for the waterproofing to be redone, not to mention restoring everything to its original state. Based on my personal experience, I’ve compiled a list of 10 important mistakes and reasons why bathroom waterproofing fails that you should take seriously.

The following general and specific mistakes come to mind, when looking back at so many of my bathroom waterproofing jobs, carried out over the years. Many home owners give little importance to bathroom waterproofing, especially shower cubicles during a bathroom remodeling process.

1. Attempting to do the waterproofing job yourself, yet having no experience and not following the waterproofing material data sheet and application instructions.

2. Giving the job to an unlicensed and unqualified person and not requesting warranties for the job in writing.

3. Floor and wall surfaces which can be concrete, wood chipboard paneling or cement fibre boards, not prepared and primed adequately before applying the waterproofing membrane material.

4. Not leaving the waterproofing membrane material enough time to dry before applying cement and sand bedding or gluing tiles to it.

5. Inadequate sealing of floor to wall and wall to wall corner details, where there is a lot of movement due to temperature changes which is particularly a problem with cement fibre sheeted walls on timber framing.

6. Not having the membrane turned up under the bathroom door area with an aluminum or brass angle fixed into the floor first.. This is a very common mistake and easily avoidable.

7. Inadequate sealing around pipe and tap wall penetrations in shower cubicles and bathtubs, usually because the plumber had no attention to detail or used the wrong sealant, resulting in water leaking into the wall.. In some instances the repair is not so extensive or difficult, but will still cost money.

8. Although not directly related to waterproofing, the tiler using the wrong type of glue for wall tiles, because the walls were waterproofed with a polyurethane based waterproof membrane for example while the glue used is acrylic based.

9. The plumber should conduct a water pressure test on the water pipes, by leaving the pipes under water pressure for 24 hours and do a visual inspection for any water leaks before the walls are sheeted to ensure that that are no pinholes in the system where water can slowly drip and find its way under the bathroom floor and surrounding areas. In some of the waterproofing rectification jobs I had a contract to do, the culprit for the water leaks from under the bathroom floor turned out to be a small leak in the water pipe in the wall which kept dripping ever …

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Home Improvement Tips – Waterproofing Your Basement!

Basements, sadly, are subject to a number of negative stereotypes ie they are dark, dreary, damp and humid. Well, you can take care of the dark, dreariness with a few well thought out design flourishes, but the damp and humid part is a little more challenging. Waterproofing is imperative if you are going to use your basement as any type of occupied space.

The process of waterproofing involves a combination of sealing and finding drainage solutions. If you start too late, you will also have to include water damage restoration in this process. When properly protected from water, your basement can function just like any other part of your house.

Understanding Water Leakage
The first step towards any recovery is admitting you have a problem, and a water leakage problem is no different. Usually leakage is caused by a number of different factors. As your home ages, your basement begins to settle and form tiny cracks and fissures in the walls and floors. These tiny openings can let water into the space. Basement walls and floors are made out of concrete, which is a porous material. Also, most basements are built below the water table so the ground water causes hydrostatic pressure, which pushes on the basement walls and can soak through the pores and cracks in the concrete. Other leakage may also occur at the footers where the walls and floors meet. This is usually because the hydrostatic pressure is pushing on the basement walls with more force than it is pushing on the floors. This causes the walls to start cracking slightly at the footer, and it allows water in to the basement.

Devising a Plan
In order to devise a game plan for fixing your leaky basement, it is helpful to understand the basics of water seepage. Cracks in the floors, walls, and joints must be sealed as soon as they are visible. You can also seal the entire interior of your basement (walls and floors) to prevent water from being wicked to the inside space. Slightly more drastic measures can also be taken. You can install French drains, sump pumps, and drainage systems that are on the exterior, interior, or below the slab. All of these systems help reduce the hydrostatic pressure on the basement walls, which cause the majority of basement leakage.

Call in a Basement Waterproofing Contractor
When it comes to waterproofing your basement, you are better off letting the pros handle the job. You might be tempted to tackle the project yourself, but note that fewer then 20% of homeowners are successful at waterproofing their own basements. With odds like these, it is wise to call in a professional basement waterproofing contractor. This professional will have the skills necessary to identify the source of the seepage, and determine the best way for addressing the problem. Hiring a professional before trying it yourself will end up saving you time and money in the long run. A dry basement is a pleasant basement, so save …

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