Coronavirus live news: one million deaths worldwide; warning that Germany faces 19,200 cases a day | World news

Global deaths from Covid-19 have reached 1 million, but experts are still struggling to figure out a crucial metric in the pandemic: the fatality rate – the percentage of people infected with the pathogen who die.

Here is a look at issues surrounding better understanding the COVID-19 death rate.

How is a death rate calculated?

A true mortality rate would compare deaths against the total number of infections, a denominator that remains unknown because the full scope of asymptomatic cases is difficult to measure. Many people who become infected simply do not experience symptoms.

Scientists have said the total number of infections is exponentially higher than the current number of confirmed cases, now at 33 million globally. Many experts believe the coronavirus likely kills 0.5% to 1% of people infected, making it a very dangerous virus globally until a vaccine is identified.

Researchers have begun to break down that risk by age group, as evidence mounts that younger people and children are far less likely to experience severe disease.

“The death rate for people below age 20 is probably one in 10,000. Over the age of 85 it is around one in 6,” said Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Gravediggers in Indonesia have struggled to cope with demand from Covid-19 deaths.

Gravediggers in Indonesia have struggled to cope with demand from Covid-19 deaths. Photograph: Ed Wray/Getty Images

What is a “case fatality rate”?

There has been an apparent decline in death rates when measured against the number of new infections confirmed by coronavirus testing. In places like the United States, that “case fatality rate” has fallen dramatically from 6.6% in April to just over 2% in August, according to Reuters statistics.

But experts said that the decline has largely been driven by more widespread testing compared with the early days of the pandemic, detecting more people who have mild illness or no symptoms. Improvements in treating the severely ill and protecting some of the highest-risk groups, are also credited with improving survival.

“We are much more aware of potential complications and how to recognize and treat them,” said Dr. Amesh Adalja of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security in Baltimore. “If you are a patient who gets COVID-19 in 2020, you would much rather get it now than in March.”

A Covid-19 test being conducted in Guwahati, in northeastern India.

A Covid-19 test being conducted in Guwahati, in northeastern India. Photograph: Xinhua/REX/Shutterstock

What does that mean for individuals, and governments?

That highlights the need for continued vigilance, as some countries begin to experience a second wave of infections.

For example, researchers in France estimate that country’s case fatality rate fell by 46% by the end of July compared with the end of May, driven by an increase in testing, improved medical care and a greater proportion of infections occurring in younger people, who are less likely to experience severe disease.

“Now, we are seeing a fresh rise in hospitalisations and ICU (intensive care unit) registrations, which means this discrepancy is about to end,” said Mircea Sofonea,

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Bodycam footage of a police officer showing up at a home near Miami University’s campus, and finding a number of men gathered on the porch without masks on.

USA TODAY

Drug developers are racing to create a COVID-19 vaccine, but a post-pandemic world won’t suddenly arrive when one is successfully developed. 

A return to “normal living” won’t come until “several months” after a vaccine first arrives, Dr. Anthony Fauci said on CNN. That’s likely to be about a year away, as a successful vaccine still needs to be manufactured and distributed at a massive scale.

In the meantime, Americans are learning more about risks associated with several parts of normal life that remain. Recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention studies documented health challenges in dining and daycare. One study found dining out was linked with higher infection rates in adults. Another study documented children who were infected in daycare and spread the virus at home. 

Meanwhile colleges continue to be hotspots for the virus: Of the 25 hottest outbreaks in the U.S., communities heavy with college students represent 19 of them.

Some significant developments:

📈 Today’s numbers: Montana, North Dakota, Guam and Puerto Rico set records for deatsh this week, according to a USA TODAY analysis of Johns Hopkins data through late Friday. No state records for new cases were set. The U.S. has more than 6.4 million confirmed cases and more than 193,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. Globally, there are more than 28 million cases and more than 916,000 fatalities.

📰 What we’re reading:  Not everyone wants to rush to reopened restaurants and beaches during the pandemic, but they may be at odds with opinions from friends and family. Here’s how to say no to weddings, holiday dinners and more.

🗺️ Mapping coronavirus: Track the U.S. outbreak, state by state

This file will be updated throughout the day. For updates in your inbox, subscribe to The Daily Briefing newsletter.

Bodycam footage: Ohio police bust party at house filled with infected college students

A college student house held a party over the Labor Day weekend that included people who had recently tested positive for the coronavirus, according to police body camera footage.

Police in Oxford, Ohio, cited six men who attended a house party near Miami University  last Saturday for violating the state’s mass gathering and quarantine ordinance. Bodycam footage shows an officer arriving at a home near the campus and finding men without masks on the porch.

In the footage, one of the residents tells the officer he tested positive a week before. The officer asks how many other people in the house have COVID-19, and the resident responds, “They all do.”

“Oh, God. This is what we’re trying to prevent,” the officer says. “We want to keep this town open.”

Dr. Robert Glatter, an emergency physician at Lenox Hill Hospital, in New York City reacted to the situation in an emailed statement: “If students could witness the death and devastation inside ERs

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Interior Health warning of possible COVID-19 exposure at hotel in downtown Kelowna



a train crossing a street in front of a building: Interior Health says a number of people attended a private party at Hotel Zed in Kelowna during the early hours of Monday, Sept. 7.


© Global News
Interior Health says a number of people attended a private party at Hotel Zed in Kelowna during the early hours of Monday, Sept. 7.

Interior Health is warning of a potential coronavirus exposure following a private party at a hotel in downtown Kelowna during the Labour Day weekend.

According to the health agency, a number of people gathered in a common area or on a balcony at Hotel Zed on Abbott Street during the early hours of Monday, Sept. 7.

Interior Health says the people may have been exposed to COVID-19, adding the party is reported to have taken place between midnight and 3:30 a.m.

Read more: B.C. sets another single-day record with 139 new COVID-19 cases

“Interior Health is working closely with the Hotel Zed, but individuals who attended this party may not have been registered guests,” said the health agency.

“Public health officials are asking people who attended this party to self-monitor closely for symptoms of COVID-19 and to get tested if they begin to exhibit symptoms.”

In an interview with Global News, IH medical health officer Dr. Silvina Mema said two people at the party tested positive after the party.

“There was a gathering in the early morning of Sept. 7, and a number of people attended that gathering,” said Mema.

“We are not clear how many people were at that gathering, but after that gathering, we know that two individuals tested positive and were infectious during the gathering.”

Interior Health said contact tracing is underway and, where possible, it is reaching out directly to individuals who have been exposed.

“This potential exposure is a reminder of how important it is to keep gatherings small and to people you know as we head into the fall,” said Interior Health.

It added that people seeking a test should call their primary care provider or the closest Interior Health community testing and assessment centre.

Interior Health says testing is recommended for anyone experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, including:

Fever

Cough

Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing

Loss of sense of taste or smell

It also said other milder symptoms may include runny nose, fatigue, body aches, diarrhea, headache, sore throat, vomiting and red eyes.

Information on public exposures to COVID-19 within the Interior Health region is available here.

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Coronavirus: Interior Health warning of possible COIVD-19 exposure at hotel in downtown Kelowna

Interior Health is warning of a potential coronavirus exposure following a private party at a hotel in downtown Kelowna during the Labour Day weekend.

According to the health agency, a number of people gathered in a common area or on a balcony at Hotel Zed on Abbott Street during the early hours of Monday, Sept. 7.

Interior Health says the people may have been exposed to COVID-19, adding the party is reported to have taken place between midnight and 3:30 a.m.

Read more:
B.C. sets another single-day record with 139 new COVID-19 cases

“Interior Health is working closely with the Hotel Zed, but individuals who attended this party may not have been registered guests,” said the health agency.

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“Public health officials are asking people who attended this party to self-monitor closely for symptoms of COVID-19 and to get tested if they begin to exhibit symptoms.”

Interior Health said contact tracing is underway and, where possible, it is reaching out directly to individuals who have been exposed.






Coronavirus: COVID-19 case numbers, speed of acceleration should both be monitored, Tam says


Coronavirus: COVID-19 case numbers, speed of acceleration should both be monitored, Tam says

“This potential exposure is a reminder of how important it is to keep gatherings small and to people you know as we head into the fall,” said Interior Health.

It added that people seeking a test should call their primary care provider or the closest Interior Health community testing and assessment centre.

Interior Health says testing is recommended for anyone experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, including:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Loss of sense of taste or smell

It also said other milder symptoms may include runny nose, fatigue, body aches, diarrhea, headache, sore throat, vomiting and red eyes.

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Information on public exposures to COVID-19 within the Interior Health region is available here.






Healthcare workers face growing stigma over coronavirus fears


Healthcare workers face growing stigma over coronavirus fears



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Six other Colorado River states send warning to Interior over Utah’s Lake Powell Pipeline

Six states with claim to water in the Colorado River have fired a warning shot at Utah over the controversial Lake Powell Pipeline.



a stone building that has a rocky cliff: The Colorado River flowing from the foot of the Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona.


© Sam Gross/The St. George Spectrum & Daily News
The Colorado River flowing from the foot of the Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona.

Don’t allow Utah to bum-rush approval for the 150-mile pipeline, the six states warned in a letter to Secretary of Interior David Bernhardt, or there could be far-reaching consequences.

The letter, signed by top water officials from Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada and Wyoming, says there are “substantive legal and operational issues” around the pipeline that remain unresolved, despite the proposed project nearing a stage where federal approval could be issued.



a boat sitting on the side of a building: The Glen Canyon Dam on the Utah/Arizona border on Aug. 21, 2020.


© Sam Gross/The St. George Spectrum & Daily News
The Glen Canyon Dam on the Utah/Arizona border on Aug. 21, 2020.

While the federal government — in this case, the Bureau of Reclamation — may normally have full authority to issue approval for an infrastructure project like this, Colorado River water is governed by a complicated and oftentimes litigious collection of inter-state compacts and Supreme Court cases known as The Law of the River.

The six states — all of the water rights holders aside from the Beehive State — are alleging Utah is attempting to circumvent this 100-year-old body of laws and compacts, potentially jeopardizing cooperation between the seven states with rights to Colorado River water — one of the west’s most finite and sought-after resources relied on by approximately 40 million people. 

“Moreover, we believe the probability of multi-year litigation over a Lake Powell Pipeline (final environmental impact statement) or (record of decision) is high, and that certain Law of the River questions properly left to discussions and resolution between the states are likely to be raised in such suits,” the letter reads.”

In a written statement, the Washington County Water Conservation District said it will work diligently with the other basin states to resolve concerns while the environmental review process is underway. 

“The district will join Utah and the basin states in finding mutually agreeable solutions that allow each state to develop its water as has traditionally been the case,” the conservation district wrote. 

The six states are looking for ‘consensus’

The Lake Powell Pipeline is Utah’s answer to expected water shortages as more and more people are projected to move to the arid desert of Washington County over the next several decades.

Projections from Utah expect population in the greater St. George area to balloon from about 180,000 people today to nearly a half-million by 2065, creating a need for water that exceeds what’s currently available, according to proponents of the project.

At peak production, the pipeline is proposed to transport about 86,000 acre-feet of water a year from Lake Powell to Sand Hollow Reservoir 140 miles away, not only increasing the amount of water available but adding another source of water to southwestern Utah’s portfolio, which currently relies solely on sources in the Virgin River Basin.

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Six states send letter of warning over Utah’s Lake Powell Pipeline

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The Colorado River flowing from the foot of the Glen Canyon Dam in Arizona.  (Photo: Sam Gross/The St. George Spectrum & Daily News)

Six states with claim to water in the Colorado River have fired a warning shot at Utah over the controversial Lake Powell Pipeline.

Don’t allow Utah to bum-rush approval for the 150-mile pipeline, the six states warned in a letter to Secretary of Interior David Bernhardt, or there could be far-reaching consequences.

The letter, signed by top water officials from Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada and Wyoming, says there are “substantive legal and operational issues” around the pipeline that remain unresolved, despite the proposed project nearing a stage where federal approval could be issued.

While the federal government — in this case, the Bureau of Reclamation — may normally have full authority to issue approval for an infrastructure project like this, Colorado River water is governed by a complicated and oftentimes litigious collection of inter-state compacts and Supreme Court cases known as The Law of the River.

The six states — all of the water rights holders aside from the Beehive State — are alleging Utah is attempting to circumvent this 100-year-old body of laws and compacts, potentially jeopardizing cooperation between the seven states with rights to Colorado River water — one of the west’s most finite and sought-after resources relied on by approximately 40 million people. 

“Moreover, we believe the probability of multi-year litigation over a Lake Powell Pipeline (final environmental impact statement) or (record of decision) is high, and that certain Law of the River questions properly left to discussions and resolution between the states are likely to be raised in such suits,” the letter reads.”

COMMENT FROM WCWCD

The six states are looking for ‘consensus’

The Lake Powell Pipeline is Utah’s answer to expected water shortages as more and more people are projected to move to the arid desert of Washington County over the next several decades.

Projections from Utah expect population in the greater St. George area to balloon from about 180,000 people today to nearly a half-million by 2065, creating a need for water that exceeds what’s currently available, according to proponents of the project.

At peak production, the pipeline is proposed to transport about 86,000 acre-feet of water a year from Lake Powell to Sand Hollow Reservoir 140 miles away, not only increasing the amount of water available but adding another source of water to southwestern Utah’s portfolio, which currently relies solely on sources in the Virgin River Basin.

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The Colorado River flowing the Glen Canyon Dam just south of Lake Powell.  (Photo: Sam Gross/The St. George Spectrum & Daily News)

Aside from the contentious issues surrounding the actual construction of the pipeline across vast expanses of environmentally sensitive and culturally significant lands, this proposal raises a host of issues ranging from

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