The return of warm, earthy browns is among fall decor trends | Home & Garden

Don’t overdo brown, she warns, but blend it with modern materials like marble for beautiful juxtapositions.

“Bringing it in with light woods, leathers and other natural materials can help make a space feel timeless,” Jimenez says.

Melissa Morgan of M Interiors in San Antonio, Texas, thinks brown’s rebirth is “a reaction to years of very light, tonal interiors. Clients are looking for warmth and sanctuary in their homes more than ever.”

Lighter, yellowish browns, like caramel, often works well in leather.

“In upholstery, we consider saddle leather to be a form of brown that’s like a trusty pair of blue jeans – it goes with everything,” said Chicago designer Brynn Olson.

Soft browns and caramels are also appearing in pillows, lamps and drapes. Caning is on trend too, said Amy Leferink of Interior Impressions in Woodbury, Minn.

As for furniture, Olson likes the effect of brown stains on walnut and white oak, and said that a beautifully stained built-in is timeless. “Natural walnut will always feel fresh, and we love to pair it with bright white decor such as plaster vases, for a sophisticated pairing of textures,” she said.

That brown-and-white combo has been a favorite of decorating icons including Billy Baldwin, said New York City designer Glenn Gissler. Baldwin’s apartment in Manhattan featured a mix of glossy brown walls, white and chartreuse furniture, and brass accents. Inspired, Gissler recently painted a New York loft in a deep, rich brown, with columns and ceilings in crisp white. A long, tuxedo-style sofa in milk-chocolatey velvet anchors the space, along with tonal modern art.

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Meet the woman who runs Dayton’s 2nd Street Market, ‘the warm and inviting kitchen for Dayton’

Lynda Suda manages one of the city’s favorite places to spend time — Five Rivers MetroPark’s 2nd Street Market.



a woman wearing a hat: Lynda Suda is manager of Five River's MetroParks 2nd Street Market. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO


© Provided by Dayton Daily News
Lynda Suda is manager of Five River’s MetroParks 2nd Street Market. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The pandemic has altered normal operations, but the venue is holding outdoor-only markets each Saturday with plans to continue through October.

“The market is an inclusive place where people can be themselves, relax and get to know the people who grow, raise and prepare their food,” Suda said.

If you haven’t visited the market, our Daytonian of the Week will tell you why this downtown Dayton gem is special.



a person standing in front of a brick building: Lynda Suda is the manager of Five Rivers MetroPark's 2nd Street Market. CONTRIBUTED


© Provided by Dayton Daily News
Lynda Suda is the manager of Five Rivers MetroPark’s 2nd Street Market. CONTRIBUTED

Tell us about your background. What has led you to this point in your career?

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I was born and raised in Spokane, Wash. After spending a few years in both Philadelphia, PA and Denver, CO, my husband Marc and I moved our family to Dayton 16 years ago this month. We enjoyed raising our two sons, Tyme and Zhen, and helping Marc’s ailing mother in the same neighborhood Marc grew up in, Five Oaks.

My work background has mostly been connected to small, family owned retail businesses. Prior to moving to Dayton, most of that experience was artisan jewelry related, but when I moved to Dayton, I was able to combine my retail experience with my interest in health and wellness. The first opportunity to do so, came when I started working at and eventually managing a local health food store. After being there ten years, as the owner put it, “it was time for a change”. I went back to school, finishing my liberal studies degree at Antioch Midwest University with a focus on integrated health and wellness.

While at Antioch, the opportunity to work for Five Rivers MetroParks (something I’d wanted to do since moving to Dayton) presented itself with the 2nd Street Market coordinator position. Gratefully, I was hired and enjoyed working and learning the ropes with my predecessor, Jimmy Harless, for two years. When Jimmy announced his retirement, I applied and took over as market manager in December of 2018.

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For those who may not be familiar, what is the 2nd Street Market?

The 2nd Street Market is a year-round public market located in a historical freight depot in downtown Dayton. It is home to a variety of farmers, specialty food, prepared food and artisan vendors providing a unique shopping experience. Normally it is a vibrant community gathering space that features local musicians and other family-friendly programming. You can purchase everything you need to prepare healthy, delicious meals, as well as unique handcrafted gifts and delicious prepared foods.



a traffic light on a city street: The 2nd Street Market, located at 600 E. Second St., before the coronavirus pandemic. LISA POWELL / STAFF


© Provided by Dayton Daily News
The 2nd Street Market, located at 600 E. Second St., before the coronavirus pandemic. LISA

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Warm fall dishes bring son to the kitchen, table

Friends warned me. People who, before me, had sons. They told me that my son would suddenly and abruptly not want to spend time with me. He would, they said, leave my camp. They said he would first leave me and then leave my husband. At the time it was hard to believe. He was so joyful, so fun, so very excited about the world and all of its gifts.

And then, of course, he did. He found his own interests, his own people, his independence. That was many years ago and I did my best to let him go. It’s good, it’s fine, it’s the way parenting is supposed to be. They grow and push you away and hopefully, if everything is right, they come back.

I’m working on Elliot coming back. He’s 16 now and a pretty laid-back guy. He does what we ask of him. Mow the lawn? Empty the dishwasher? Walk the dog? Yep, yup and did it already. Sometimes, we have to ask twice but it’s not a fight. My husband and I do ask him to hang out with us and to this he almost always says no. He’s got homework. The guys are waiting for him. He’s tired. You know, anything is better than spending time with his parents.

Recently, we’ve been asking him to go for short hikes with us or watch a movie. Heck, I even asked him to sit beside me and learn to knit. That I said knowing there was no way my 16-year-old son would knit. But in asking and showing Elliot my project, I had a few more moments with him.

I’ve also been calling him downstairs when I’m cooking dinner. I’ll place an onion and the chef’s knife on the counter and when he arrives, I point and say, “Chop.” He does it easily, without complaint. I fall in beside him and knowing that teenagers are a bit like scared animals (approach too fast and they run away), I move in slowly. I ask about school, friends, guitar. I keep it to things he likes. I don’t grill him for information; sometimes we just chop quietly.

It’s crazy but I do forget that food is the best thing to bring us together. It’s our common denominator. Elliot doesn’t want to spend an afternoon hiking with Paul and I or even watch a movie. He definitely doesn’t want to knit. But he will chop or stir or whisk, even for a few minutes. If you’ve ever waited for a child who has left your camp, you’ll understand how sweet it is to just stand with him.

What follows are a few things that have come out of my kitchen in recent weeks. Things Elliot has helped me make, and also things his only part in was the eating. I know he would rather have sausage and chicken, pasta and plain salad to vegetables. But while I’m willing to do a lot to bring him back over to

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7 Conservatory Decor Ideas To Keep Room Warm And Cosy In Winter

Conservatories, garden rooms and orangeries are often beautiful, light-filled living spaces but they can feel pretty cold and unenjoyable as soon as the temperature plummets.

In order to continue using these rooms during autumn and winter, we’ve compiled some practical conservatory decor ideas full of smart tweaks (which can also be applied to an orangery and garden room) to help create a warm and cosy space.

‘Cold weather needn’t mean these rooms should be abandoned. Instead, we update them to make them extra cosy and comfortable to relax in whatever the weather,’ says Catharina Björkman, Scandi lifestyle expert at Contura.

‘Garden rooms and conservatories are a connection between our indoor living space and the outdoors, which is so beneficial for our wellbeing, but these rooms can get chilly, dark and damp as the weather cools down.’

From using a wood burner to styling your room with decorative rugs, there are plenty of ways you can keep your space cosy throughout the colder months. Get some inspiration with these conservatory decor ideas below…

1. Hang curtains or blinds

As well as adding character, curtains and blinds will help your conservatory or garden room to retain heat in the cooler months.

If you’re not sure which style to go for, Catharina suggests: ‘It’s tempting to choose heavy, dark winter curtains, but for longevity, choose a neutral colour that will work all year round. Soft greys, warm yellows or soothing greys all work well. If possible, choose floor-to-ceiling options to retain the most heat, these can be tied back in summer as well.’

pleated blinds, house beautiful range at hillarys

2. Warm lighting

Create a warm and welcoming atmosphere with beautiful lights. Harsh lighting can be abrasive in the darker months, so opt for floor lamps, hanging fairy lights or table lamps instead.

lighting from garden trading hanging in a conservatory

‘You could add coloured lantern style lighting (red or amber look really inviting) combined with tea lights for a warm, cosy glow,’ adds Catharina. ‘Strings of fairy lights hung strategically can enhance a cosy look. Alternatively, look for lights with a dimmer option so you can adjust the light brightness to suit the required cosy factor.’

3. Decorative rugs

Most garden rooms and conservatories have wooden or tiled flooring, so warm rugs are brilliant for adding warmth underfoot. As well as helping to retain room temperature, they can also help to bring the overall room style together.

shaggy rug, £275, cox  cox

When it comes to pattern, Catharina explains: ‘A bold print rug, such as decorative Indian style, can look great combined with more laid-back interiors, but play around with shape, colour, texture and size to find the right look for the space. Rug wall hangings can also look stylish and help prevent heat loss through the walls.’

4. Cosy textures

Add an extra of layer of warmth with cosy blankets, cushions and throws — perfect for curling up with.

Catharina adds: ‘Choose warm colours and earthy tones that work well for autumn/winter, such as burnt orange, moss greens and warming terracotta. Go for textures that are soft and woolly for the

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