Election 2020: Garden City Voter Guide

GARDEN CITY, NY — Voters in Garden City will head to the polls Tuesday, Nov. 3, for the 2020 general election.

In addition to the presidential and congressional races, there are several key races at the state and local level. Voting will be different this year thanks to rules approved to expand early and mail-in voting in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

The deadline to register to vote is Oct. 24. You can check your voting status on the Secretary of State’s website, where you can also find your polling place.

There are several ways residents can vote:

Mail-In Voting

Vote-by-mail applications must be received by the Nassau County clerk by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 27.

The ballot itself must either be personally delivered to the board of elections no later than the close of polls on Election Day, or postmarked by a governmental postal service not later than the day of the election and received no later than the 7th day after the election.

Early Voting

Early voting starts on Oct. 24 and runs until Nov. 1.

There are 15 early voting locations in Nassau County:

  • Elmont Public Library, 700 Hempstead Turnpike, Elmont

  • Floral Park Recreation Center, 124 Stewart St., Floral Park

  • Freeport Recreation Center, 130 E. Merrick Road, Freeport

  • Recreation Complex at St. Paul’s Field House, 295 Stewart Ave., Garden City

  • Brierley Park, 65 Dartmouth St., Hempstead

  • Levittown Hall, 201 Levittown Parkway, Hicksville

  • Lawrence Country Club, 101 Causeway, Lawrence

  • Oyster Bay Town Hall South, 977 Hicksville Road, Massapequa

  • North Merrick Public Library, 1691 Meadowbrook Road, North Merrick

  • Mid-Island Y JCC, 45 Manetto Hill Road, Plainview

  • Gayle Community Center, 53 Orchard St., Roslyn Heights

  • St. Markella Greek Orthodox Church, 1960 Jones Ave., Wantagh

  • West Hempstead Public Library, 500 Hempstead Ave., West Hempstead

  • Yes We Can Center-New Cassel, 141 Garden St., Westbury

  • Nassau County Board of Elections, 240 Old Country Road, Mineola

Any voter can vote at any of the early voting locations. The times the locations are open vary by date.

  • Oct. 24, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

  • Oct. 25, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

  • Oct. 26, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Oct. 27, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Oct. 28, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Oct. 29, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Oct. 30, 6 a.m. to 7 p.m.

  • Oct. 31, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

  • Nov. 1, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

All polling locations are open at all times, except for the Board of Elections office, which is open for voting until 8 p.m. on Oct. 26 and 28.

Voting on Election Day

Polls in New York are open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Election Day.

You can find your assigned polling place by visiting the New York State Board of Elections website. For questions about voting in Garden City, contact the Nassau County Board of Elections at 516-571-VOTE (8683).

Key Races

The following are the key contested races that will be on the ballot for Garden City voters:

President/Vice President

Joe Biden/Kamala Harris

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Top House Republicans light into DC elections board for ‘failure to take responsibility’ for voter rolls

Top House Republicans on Thursday are sending a letter to the Washington, D.C., Board of Elections (DCBOE) expressing concern over reports that many ballots are being sent to people who have moved or died and lighting into the board for “its failure to take responsibility” for its voter rolls.

The letter comes after D.C. began mailing ballots to residents late last month in an effort to allow people to avoid polling places on Election Day and prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus. But soon after there were widespread complaints from voters that they were getting ballots that were addressed to people who had in some cases not lived at a particular residence for years. Some voters reported that they still were sent ballots for voters who no longer lived in their residence even after they had returned DCBOE postcards confirming that certain voters no longer lived at their address.

“Notwithstanding its failure to take responsibility for creating this avoidable situation, the Board places a large onus squarely on individual citizens to clean up a mess solely of the Board’s making,” said the Republicans, led by Oversight Committee Ranking Member James Comer of Kentucky. “This appears to be the only ‘safeguard’ in place, with no other procedures to avoid, detect, and/or divert misaddressed ballots.”

RETURN TO SENDER: DC VOTERS ARE BEING SENT MAIL-IN BALLOTS FOR EX-RESIDENTS

Outdated voter rolls are a common problem in many jurisdictions around the country. But the issue has been brought to the forefront ahead of the 2020 presidential election as many states and jurisdictions like D.C. are quickly moving to universal mail-in voting systems — where all voters are sent mail ballots without needing to request them — amid the pandemic.

The elections board asked the voters repeatedly on social media to mark any such ballots “return to sender” and mail them back so the DCBOE could update its voter rolls. A  spokesperson for the DCBOE told Fox News last week that it is asking voters to “do your part” and “don’t take advantage” of ballots that were sent to them in error. When voters return such ballots to sender, the DCBOE will update its records, the spokesperson said.

TEXAS GOVERNOR FACES THIRD LAWSUIT OVER LIMIT ON MAIL BALLOT DROP-OFF SITES

“In fact, it is unclear whether the DC Board of Elections took any steps to prevent misaddressed ballots from being sent out in the first place,” the House Republicans continued in their letter. “It is unclear when the Board last updated its voter rolls or whether it is currently taking any steps to rectify the current situation. It is also unclear what safeguards the DC Board of Elections has in place to detect fraudulent ballots or preventing an individual from casting multiple ballots.”

The DCBOE told Fox News last week that it verifies signatures of all mail-in ballots so that any ballots sent fraudulently will be detected. When asked last week whether it was taking any proactive steps to prevent more misaddressed ballots from

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White House slams FBI chief Wray over voter fraud testimony

By Doina Chiacu



a man wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on "Threats to the Homeland", on Capitol Hill in Washington


© Reuters/POOL
FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on “Threats to the Homeland”, on Capitol Hill in Washington

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – FBI Director Christopher Wray faced criticism from the White House for the second time in a week on Friday when President Donald Trump’s chief of staff questioned his ability to detect voter fraud as the November election draws near.

Wray told lawmakers on Thursday he has not seen evidence of a “coordinated national voter fraud effort,” undercutting the Republican president’s unfounded assault on mail-in balloting before his Nov. 3 contest against Democrat Joe Biden.

Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, denigrated Wray during an interview with CBS “This Morning.”

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there’s any kind of voter fraud,” he said without elaborating.

A top federal prosecutor in the battleground state of Pennsylvania on Thursday said his office and the FBI were investigating whether nine military ballots cast for Trump had been handled improperly.

Meadows suggested to CBS that Wray “drill down on the investigation that just started … Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and then he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill.”

The FBI had no comment on Meadows’ remarks.

Trump appointed Wray as FBI director after he fired James Comey in 2017 during a federal probe into ties between the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and Russia.

Last week, Wray testified before a House of Representatives committee that his biggest concern in the 2020 election was the “steady drumbeat of misinformation” coming from Russian interference.

That prompted Trump to retort, “I did not like his answers yesterday.”

Wray’s statements run contrary to the Republican president’s stances as he seeks re-election on Nov. 3 in the race against Democrat Joe Biden. Trump continues to downplay the threat from Moscow and argues that mail-in voting, which many states are relying on during the coronavirus pandemic, poses a threat to election security.



a man wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on "Threats to the Homeland", on Capitol Hill in Washington


© Reuters/POOL
FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on “Threats to the Homeland”, on Capitol Hill in Washington

Asked if Trump had confidence in Wray, Meadows told reporters on Friday he has not spoken to the president about it.

Trump himself has repeatedly and without evidence questioned the increased use of mail-in ballots, an established method of voting in the United States.

He also continues to bristle at U.S. intelligence agencies’ finding that Russia acted to boost Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and undermine his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Additional reporting by Susan Heavey; Editing by Nick Zieminski and Cynthia Osterman)

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White House chief of staff Mark Meadows contradicts FBI Director Christopher Wray on voter fraud

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows disputed FBI Director Christopher Wray’s testimony to Congress on Thursday that there’s no evidence of voter fraud by mail or otherwise, and he suggested that Wray “needs to get involved on the ground.”

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there is any kind of voter fraud,” Meadows said in an interview with “CBS This Morning” on Friday. Wray had told the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee that there was no evidence of a “coordinated national voter fraud effort.”

Meadows also made reference to a Washington Post report about 500 “problematic” ballots that had been sent to some voters in North Carolina, although this was the result of a clerical error, and not voter fraud. Moreover, people can still only vote once, meaning that even if they sent in two ballots, their vote would only be counted once. Earlier this month, President Trump urged North Carolinians to vote twice, which is a felony.

“Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill,” Meadows said of Wray.

In a separate gaggle with reporters on Friday morning, Meadows also sidestepped a question from CBS News’ Ben Tracy about whether the president still had confidence in Wray.

“It’s time for Director Wray to quit, in my mind, playing footsie with transparency and delivery those documents,” Meadows said, which may have been a reference to material sought by Congress about Crossfire Hurricane, the FBI’s counterintelligence investigation into any links between 2016 Trump campaign associates and Russian meddling in the election. On Thursday, newly released records from the Justice Department first reported by CBS News showed that the primary sub-source for the Steele dossier had been the subject of an earlier counterintelligence investigation by the FBI.

Mr. Trump has repeatedly tried to sow doubts about the legitimacy of mail-in ballots, baselessly claiming that it leads to widespread voter fraud. However, the president has encouraged mail-in voting in Florida, a key swing state that is considered to be critical to his reelection.

The president has also refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power should Joe Biden win the presidential election, saying only that “we’re going to have to see what happens.” On Thursday, he told reporters, “We want to make sure the election is honest and I’m not sure that it can be.” 

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White House Slams FBI Chief Wray Over Voter Fraud Testimony | Top News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows on Friday denigrated FBI Director Christopher Wray’s ability to detect voter fraud in the U.S. election and suggested that if he “drill down” more he would change his congressional testimony on the issue.

Wray told lawmakers on Thursday he has not seen evidence of a coordinated national voter fraud effort, undercutting President Donald Trump’s unfounded assault on mail-in balloting as a threat to election security.

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there’s any kind of voter fraud,” Meadows said on CBS “This Morning.” It was not clear what missing emails he was referring to.

A top federal prosecutor in the battleground state of Pennsylvania on Thursday said his office and the FBI was investigating whether nine military ballots cast for Trump had been handled improperly.

Earlier in the day, Wray told the Senate Homeland Security Committee that, “We have not seen, historically, any kind of coordinated national voter fraud effort in a major election, whether it’s by mail or otherwise. We have seen voter fraud at the local level from time to time.”

Meadows suggested on CBS that Wray “drill down on the investigation that just started … Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and then he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill.”

The FBI did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Meadows’ remarks.

Trump appointed Wray as FBI director after he fired James Comey in 2017 during a federal probe into ties between the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and Russia.

Earlier this month, Wray testified before a House of Representatives committee that his biggest concern in the 2020 election was the “steady drumbeat of misinformation” coming from Russian interference.

Both statements run contrary to the Republican president’s stances as he seeks re-election on Nov. 3 in the race against Democrat Joe Biden. Trump continues to downplay the threat from Moscow and argues that mail-in voting, which many states are relying on during the coronavirus pandemic, poses a threat to election security.

Asked if Trump had confidence in Wray, Meadows told reporters on Friday he has not spoken to the president about it.

Trump himself has repeatedly and without evidence questioned the increased use of mail-in ballots, a long established method of voting in the United States.

The Republican president has long bristled at that U.S. intelligence agencies’ finding that Russia acted to boost now-Trump’s 2016 campaign and undermine his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

Trump repeatedly referenced Clinton’s “missing emails” during that campaign, mockingly asking Russia to help find them. A State Department investigation of Clinton’s use of a private email server while she was secretary of state has found no evidence of deliberate mishandling of classified information.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Additional reporting by Susan Heavey; Editing by Nick Zieminski)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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