3 Hells Kitchen Eateries Lose Liquor License For COVID Violations

HELL’S KITCHEN, NY — Three restaurants in Hell’s Kitchen had their liquor licenses suspended by the state this week for violating rules intended to curb the spread of the coronavirus, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday.

Taqueria Diana on Ninth Avenue, Sushiva, also on Ninth, and Kochi, on 10th Avenue, all had their licenses suspended by the New York State Liquor Authority after inspectors found unsafe conditions there earlier this month, the state said. They are among 33 restaurants and bars statewide being hit with suspensions this week.

State investigators visited Taqueria Diana on Sept. 2, where they found five customers drinking indoors, violating the city’s ban on indoor dining which has being in place since March. The customers, a bartender and a kitchen employee were not wearing face coverings, the state said.

The state called the Mexican restaurant and bar a “repeat offender,” having previously been knocked for allowing indoor dining in July.

Inspectors visited Sushiva on Sept. 4, where they found six customers eating and drinking inside the Japanese restaurant. Its liquor license had only been issued three months earlier on June 1, the state said.

At Kochi, inspectors on Sept. 7 found about 30 customers and servers inside the Korean restaurant, violating the indoor dining ban. They also reported about 20 customers eating and drinking directly outside the restaurant, breaking social distancing requirements.

The state has now suspended 201 liquor licenses during the pandemic began, part of a crackdown by Gov. Andrew Cuomo in which three violations would result in a restaurant being shut down by the state.

Businesses face fines as high as $10,000 or immediate suspension of their liquor license for violating COVID-19 regulations.

“New Yorkers have worked together to stop the spread of coronavirus — but with our infection rate hovering around 1 percent and the threat of a second wave on the horizon, we must double down on the successful strategies that have helped us over the last six months,” Cuomo said in a statement.

Anna Quinn contributed to this report.

This article originally appeared on the Midtown-Hell’s Kitchen Patch

Source Article

Read more

House to investigate DeJoy possible campaign law violations

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats said Tuesday they will investigate whether Postmaster General Louis DeJoy encouraged employees at his former business to contribute to Republican candidates and then reimbursed them in the guise of bonuses, a violation of campaign finance laws.



FILE - In this Aug. 24, 2020, file photo, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy testifies during a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on the Postal Service on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trump says he's open to an investigation of  DeJoy after some of DeJoy's former employees said they felt pressured to donate to GOP candidates.(Tom Williams/Pool via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Aug. 24, 2020, file photo, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy testifies during a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on the Postal Service on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trump says he’s open to an investigation of DeJoy after some of DeJoy’s former employees said they felt pressured to donate to GOP candidates.(Tom Williams/Pool via AP)

Five people who worked for DeJoy’s former company, New Breed Logistics, say they were urged by DeJoy’s aides or by DeJoy himself to write checks and attend fundraisers at his mansion in Greensboro, North Carolina, The Washington Post reported. Two former employees told the newspaper that DeJoy would later give bigger bonuses to reimburse for the contributions.

It’s not illegal to encourage employees to contribute to candidates, but it is illegal to reimburse them as a way of avoiding federal campaign contribution limits.

Rep. Carolyn Maloney, who chairs the House Oversight Committee, said in a statement Tuesday that if the allegations are true, “DeJoy could face criminal exposure — not only for his actions in North Carolina, but also for lying to our Committee under oath.”

She was referring to DeJoy’s testimony before her committee last month, when he forcefully denied that he had repaid executives for contributing to Trump’s campaign.

Maloney, a New York Democrat, urged the Postal Service Board of Governors to immediately suspend DeJoy, whom “they never should have selected in the first place.”

Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., chairman of the oversight panel’s government operations subcommittee, said DeJoy has “repeatedly broken the trust of the American people and must resign or be fired.”

Monty Hagler, a spokesperson for DeJoy, told the Post that DeJoy was unaware that any workers felt pressure to make donations. Hagler also said DeJoy believes he has always complied with campaign fundraising laws and regulations.

President Donald Trump said Monday that DeJoy, a major donor to Trump and other Republicans, should lose his job if campaign finance irregularities are uncovered.

DeJoy already faces unrelated scrutiny from Congress for U.S. Postal Service changes that some fear will slow delivery of mail-in ballots for the Nov. 3 elections.

DeJoy was put in charge of the Postal Service in June after a career in logistics and set in motion a series of policy changes that have delayed mail and sparked concern over the agency’s ability to process a flood of mail-in ballots expected this fall due to coronavirus fears.

The oversight committee recently subpoenaed DeJoy for rec ords about widespread mail delivery delays that have pushed the Postal Service into the political spotlight.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more