vintage home love: Farmhouse Bathroom

It’s been a long time since I’ve given our master bathroom a facelift and since I was so happy with the Simply White paint I chose for the kitchen, I wanted to extend that color to our master bathroom, as well.  A cool find from hubby also played a part in giving this room a redo. 

I know there are lots of folks that don’t like radiators or that want to cover them up but not me.  I love the cast iron and view them as a piece of art.  There weren’t any old radiators in our 100 year old home when we moved in and I never really cared that much until I started seeing really cool versions of them. 

And as luck would have it, hubby was given several radiators a few weeks ago.  A couple of them were huge and so heavy that they maybe would have put a hole through our floor so I chose this small one. 

I cleaned it up, primed it and then painted it Simply White as well.  I really love it and actually wish it was a working radiator.  That inspired a redo, so I pulled things from around the house, picked up a few things and repainted Benjamin Moore’s Simply White to give it a new look.

As you can see, our master bath is small.  But that’s okay, I love it anyway. 

For the counter top, I wanted to add a few things to give it a masculine touch as well since my hubby also shares this bathroom.  So, I picked up a vintage shaving mug and brush, as well as a vintage wood leather straight edge sharpener.  It reminded me of a bread board so of course I had to use it.  🙂  For fun, I found an old photo of a barber shop price list online, printed it off and framed it.

I love the patina on the wood handle of the old shaving brush.

For the other side of the vanity, I attached an old photo I came across in a flea market to the inside of an old apothecary jar that I filled with soaps. 

I was drawn to the old photo because, if you look closely, and I did with a magnifying glass, it is a woman working in her garden, tending to her tomato plants.  And this was written on the back…..it makes me smile.

I pulled this very fragile vintage fruit basket from the dining room and filled it with white fluffy towels for beside the tub. 

I mentioned before in our previous master bath redo that we don’t have a shower in here.  Our only shower is upstairs. 

We use this bathroom for taking long soaks in the tub so I try to make it as peaceful and comfy in there as I can so that whoever takes a soak in there, will feel relaxed and special.

I also moved our Gray Farms sign from the kitchen to right above the

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Vintage Plumbing Bathroom Antiques – Home

Focus On Bathrooms

PLEASE NOTE: After 40 years collecting, buying and selling in Los Angeles, we have moved to Virginia. We are still offering large fixtures for sale until what you see in these pages is gone. After that we will focus on small pieces such as unique handles and accessories. If you are looking for something special, drop a note.


THANK YOU FOR VISITING OUR WEBSITE. IF YOU LOVE VICTORIAN ERA CLAWFOOT BATHTUBS, NEEDLE BATH RIBCAGE SHOWERS, SITZ BATH TUBS, FOOT BATH TUBS, PEDESTAL SINKS, ORNAMENTAL EMBOSSED TOILET BOWLS, FARMHOUSE KITCHEN SINKS, 3 X 6 SUBWAY TILE, ANTIQUE SHOWER DOORS, UNUSUAL NICKEL PLATED BRASS BATHROOM ACCESSORIES, HALL- MACK, VICTORIAN BATHROOM AND KITCHEN DESIGNS AND ARCHITECTURAL SALVAGE YOU HAVE FOUND ANTIQUE BATHROOM (AND KITCHEN) HEAVEN! 

PLEASE VISIT THE FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS PAGE RIGHT NEXT TO THIS ONE TO GET THE ANSWER TO COMMON QUESTIONS.

SCROLL DOWN NEAR THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE TO SEE OUR CONTACT INFORMATION. TO CONTACT US, CLICK THIS LINK: E-MAIL VINTAGE PLUMBING

CLICK ON ANY OF THE HEADINGS DOWN THE LEDT SIDE OF ANY PAGE TO VISIT THE VARIOUS SECTIONS OF OUR VIRTUAL WAREHOUSE.


Beautiful Neuvogue by Crane sink For Sale.
Beautiful Standard Shower on 42″ claw leg pan. Contact Joe Melamed near Raleigh NC at [email protected]
Priced around $12,000. Tell Joe you saw on vintageplumbing.com
Standard Mfg. Co ribcage shower on clawfoot base.
Wonderful oversized bathtub, on stunnng feet!
Nearly perfect condition with outstanding original porcelain enamel finish!
Plumbers Trade Journals. These large format magazines are trade periodicals for the plumbing and heating trades from the turn of the 2oth Century. They are a fascinating look back at plumbing in the Victorian age with page after page of advertizing illustrations of all kinds of fixtures, appliances and parts. You may have heard of these periodicals but never seen any of them. Here are many that I collected in the 1980s. And I will sell them, one at a time or the whole collection that spans from 1895 to 1907. Around $30 each or less for the newer ones. Write me for a price for all. I also have a few dozen billheads from NYCity plumbing companies. Write for details.
Always seeking to buy this set in the wall magazine rack by Hall Mack. If you have one or more for sale, please drop a note to [email protected]
 
Rare ca1905 Standard Mfg Co. Sitz tub with Wave back spray.
Three full cage Toilet Paper holders. These are created from original J.L Mott wagon wheel sides, and replicated cross bars, acorn cap nuts, tear bar, and lid all precisely as original. Very Nice!
Cage type Toilet Paper holders. Extremely hard to find.
The most incredible Victorian marble sink! ca.1893 and all carved!
Brass shield plaque on backsplash of sink. Columbus Plumbing Co. Columbus O.
Dirty Towel Basket, nickel plated brass, marked Art Brass Co.
Dirty Towel Basket, brass finish. SOLD
Neat and Rare Brasscrafters Shelf, Cups, Soap Combo holder, in Brass.
Rare and Neat
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Vintage photos of celebs in bathroom wear



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Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article



Microsoft may earn an Affiliate Commission if you purchase something through recommended links in this article

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The Soothing Pleasures of “The Victorian Kitchen Garden,” a Vintage BBC Docuseries

Some time this past spring, I had my annual realization that if I wanted to plant a garden this year I should have got started weeks, maybe months, earlier. Then I set about my annual task of Googling how to make a garden happen. A few days later, clearing out my hundreds of open browser tabs of horticultural-advice forums, I paused over an open Web page that I hadn’t noticed: a grainy upload on the mysterious and vaguely European video-hosting Web site Dailymotion. “The Victorian Kitchen Garden – S01 – E01 – The Beginning,” it said. Curious, I pressed play, and a gentle wave of clarinet arpeggios sounded from my laptop speakers, and a mist-veiled greenhouse appeared on the screen. My breathing slowed, my jaw unclenched.

After watching several episodes in a row, sinking deeper into relaxation with each passing half hour, I paused to confirm that the show was real and not a coping mechanism conjured by my subconscious to soothe my then-acute anxieties about the then-new coronavirus pandemic. “The Victorian Kitchen Garden,” it turned out, was not only real—a documentary miniseries produced, in 1987, for BBC2—but had been something of a sensation at the time of its release. It follows a master gardener, Harry Dodson, through his yearlong attempt to revive the long-fallow walled garden of Chilton Lodge, a country estate in Berkshire, using entirely Victorian-era plants, tools, and methods. Each of the series’ thirteen parts (an introductory episode, and then one for each calendar month, January through December) is narrated, on- and offscreen, by Peter Thoday, a mustachioed horticulturist whose elbow-patched tweeds and air of perpetual wonderment harmonize wonderfully with Dodson, a plainspoken sixty-something man with cheeks as pink as rhubarb, who drops his “H”s and works the soil in a shirt and tie.

The two men unhurriedly introduce viewers to the particularities of Victorian horticulture—much of it drawn from “The Beeton Book of Garden Management,” a companion to the enduringly popular “Mrs. Beeton’s Book of Household Management,” the author of which Thoday persistently, and endearingly, miscalls “Mr. Beeton.” The grand experiment begins on a frigid January morning, as Dodson and his hardy assistant, Allison (“recently qualified in fruit culture,” Thoday informs us), dive into resurfacing the garden’s original gravel paths, pruning apple trees, and planting boxwood to line the rows. As the months unfold, from one episode to the next, Thoday and Dodson wander and converse, marvelling at peaches and tut-tutting at wilted, overwintered broccoli. As he narrates the progress of the garden, Thoday offers historical asides and rambling side journeys to illustrate the exquisite ecosystem of flora, weather, manmade structure, and labor that went into Victorian horticulture: warmth-giving garden walls containing hidden furnaces, seed catalogues spanning hundreds of pages, and the game-changing “patent India-rubber hose,” which liberated gardeners from the literal burden of the watering can.

Dodson’s role isn’t just to run the throwback garden—he also provides a human portal to the heyday of such an operation. Born into a family of manor-house gardeners, Dodson

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