Trump admin warned veterans group of COVID-19 exposure: report

  • The White House reached out to a veterans organization to warn of potential COVID-19 exposure from a September 27 event honoring the families of fallen US service members, The Daily Beast reported. 
  • The warning was sent on October 2, the same day President Donald Trump announced he tested positive for COVID-19. 
  • The event was held the day after an event formally announcing Trump’s Supreme Court pick on September 26.
  • At least a dozen people who attended the Saturday event later tested positive for COVID-19. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump’s administration told a veterans group about potential COVID-19 exposure from a September 27 event honoring the families of fallen US service members on October 2, the day that Trump announced his positive coronavirus diagnoses, The Daily Beast reported. 

Timothy Davis, the CEO and President of The Greatest Generations Foundation, told the outlet that he got the notice from the White House’s Office of Public Liaison and that he’s wasn’t sure which person who attended the event’s positive diagnoses prompted the letter. 

“The White House has been in daily contact with TGGF for contact-tracing purposes after alerting us on 10/2 of a possible COVID-positive person at the event so we could know there was a potential our attendees were exposed,” Davis told The Daily Beast. 

The Washington Post reported that Trump and Vice President Mike Pence attended the event. Trump along with at least a dozen officials and staff in the White House have tested positive for COVID-19. 

On Monday, Adm. Charles W. Ray, the vice commandant of the Coast Guard, also tested positive for the virus. Ray attended the event. 

Photos from the event also showed most attendees not wearing masks or socially distancing, The Post reported. 

The event honoring Gold Star families was held a day after more than 150 people gathered in the Rose Garden of the White House for an event where President Donald Trump officially announced his nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

At least a dozen people who attended the event, including first lady Melania Trump, White House press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, Rev. John Jenkins, the president of Notre Dame University, and two Republican senators, have since tested positive. 

It’s probable that the event was a super-spreading event that might have caused the cluster of cases in the White House.

The Daily Beast reported that attendees at the Sunday event were tested prior to the event, but one source told the outlet that an office in the White House had reached out to other attendees encouraging them to get a test. 

“The communication breakdown during this is even worse than usual,” this source said. “Different departments and offices are not talking or communicating appropriately, people are doing different things, and officials are having trouble getting on the same page. The East Wing and the West Wing are dealing with this totally differently. It’s just a mess.”

TGGF and the White House did not reply to Business Insider’s

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Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Pride And Brotherhood Wall Decor

Limited-edition! Cold-cast bronze wall decor inspired by artist F. Hart’s memorial sculpture. Inscription and 18K gold-plated Vietnam Vet medallion.


Measures 11″ W x 9-3/4″ H x 1-1/2″ D




Pride And Brotherhood Wall Decor

Limited-edition! Cold-cast bronze wall decor inspired by artist F. Hart’s memorial sculpture. Inscription and 18K gold-plated Vietnam Vet medallion.

Measures 11″ W x 9-3/4″ H x 1-1/2″ D



Item no:
133050001

Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Buy This Item Now:

Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Inspirational gift is a tribute that honors Vietnam veterans! Pride and Brotherhood Wall Decor: patriotic military memorial!

Sculptural Brotherhood Wall Decor Honors Vietnam Veterans

Pride And Brotherhood Wall Decor

Limited-edition! Cold-cast bronze wall decor inspired by artist F. Hart’s memorial sculpture. Inscription and 18K gold-plated Vietnam Vet medallion.

Measures 11″ W x 9-3/4″ H x 1-1/2″ D

Item no: 133050001


Product subject to change

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Paraplegic US House candidate skydives for veterans

MILLINOCKET, Maine (AP) — A paraplegic man from Maine who is making a bid for the U.S. House brought the concept of campaign stunts to new heights Friday when he jumped out of an airplane in support of veterans.

Republican Dale Crafts, a former state representative, made the jump from 11000 feet (3,350 meters) in the early afternoon at Millinocket Regional Airport in the northern part of the state. He is running against Democratic Rep. Jared Golden, himself a Marine veteran.

Crafts landed safely after the plunge and said he can now “cross it off the bucket list.”

The candidate for Maine’s 2nd Congressional District said he took the leap to raise money for the Pine Grove Program, a Maine organization that provides free outdoor experiences for veterans, military members and disaster victims. Crafts has been paraplegic since a motorcycle accident in 1983.

Crafts and Golden are in a closely watched race in a swing district. Golden won the seat in 2018. A spokesman for Golden said the congressman “fully appreciates all efforts to raise funds to benefit his fellow veterans,” and pointed to Golden’s efforts, such as bringing a 24-bed U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs substance abuse and mental health treatment facility to Maine.

Organizers of Friday’s event said Crafts was assisted by Chris Tyll, a former Navy SEAL; and Brad Farrin, the former command chief master sergeant for the Maine Air National Guard. Farrin took the jump along with Dale. Both men were accompanied by a jumpmaster — an expert skydiver — who was strapped to their backs.

Maine Republicans have some recent history with daredevil jumps. Former President George H.W. Bush celebrated his 90th birthday by making a tandem parachute jump near his summer home in Maine in 2014. Bush made the jump despite having lost the use of his legs.

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Disabled veteran’s only bathroom in disrepair, Builders Care raising money for renovations

A Vietnam veteran and his wife who live on Jacksonville’s northside could use your help. Their only bathroom is in disrepair. They’ve been bathing out of their sink.

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A Vietnam veteran and his wife who live on Jacksonville’s northside could really use your help. Their only bathroom is in disrepair and they have had to bathe out of their sink.

“This is our shower that’s just falling down,” Brenda Tuten said.

For two years she and her husband Frank Tuten, a disabled veteran, haven’t been able to use the only shower in their house.

“It’s been hard because I’ve been having to wash with a pan at the bathroom sink,” Frank Tuten said. “It’s been a very big struggle washing up.”

“It’s hard for him to get over the tub because he had a stroke on his right side,” Brenda Tuten explained. “If I wash my hair I have to go in the kitchen sink and try to stick my head under the kitchen faucet, and if I lean my head too far I get really dizzy like I’m going to pass out.”

When the nonprofit Builders Care found out about the condition of their bathroom, Executive Director Justin Brown said they felt compelled to help.

“The Fraternal Order of Police ended up contacting us to help with their roof. The police were putting on a new roof, and we built a wheelchair ramp,” Brown said. “I hadn’t even gone in the house. Last month people said you need to go see their bathroom, so I went in and it’s their only bathroom and I said ‘Oh my gosh! We have to rectify this immediately.’ It is so heartbreaking and devastating.”

A large hole above the shower exposes the attic. 

“The ceiling pretty well fell down in the tub and right now the shower is not working. It’s not really safe because you don’t know what’s falling out of that ceiling,” Brenda Tuten explained. “We put this pan into the sink and then use a liquid soap and pour soap in there and stir it and take a wash rag and we wipe with it.”

Builders Care is now trying to raise $10,000 to remodel the Tuten’s bathroom and pay for them to stay in a hotel during the renovations, which the nonprofit plans to start next week.

“I basically said if we get $3,000 we are starting it. It’s probably about a $10,000 job, but we are going to be able to get volunteers to come help us out,” Brown said. “We started an online fundraiser on Facebook and immediately we had $800 within a few hours.”

The Tutens are grateful for the support.

“We really appreciate what they do for us, and it would be a miracle to have a walk-in shower,” Brenda Tuten said.

“It’s the nicest thing we’ve ever had done,” Frank Tuten said.

If you would like to donate to help renovate the Tuten’s bathroom visit Builders Care Facebook page. The nonprofit

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Removal of flag honoring veterans from White House sparks anger

By Alexandra Alper and Idrees Ali



a large building: FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Trump meets with Turkish President Erdogan in Washington


© Reuters/Tom Brenner
FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Trump meets with Turkish President Erdogan in Washington

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A decision by the Trump administration earlier this year to move the flag honoring missing war veterans from a prominent position atop the White House to a less visible spot on the South Lawn has angered some veterans and lawmakers, who see it as disrespectful and potentially illegal.

The flag is dedicated to prisoners of war and service members who are missing in action. According to a White House video posted in June, it was relocated in a private ceremony with full military honors, months after President Donald Trump signed into law a bill requiring the flag to be flown at certain federal sites including the White House every day.

The revelations come amid growing questions over Trump’s respect for the military, after a report last week by the Atlantic magazine alleging that Trump had called fallen American soldiers “losers” and “suckers” sparked outrage and controversy.

Trump denied the assertions, but has publicly disparaged the service of the late Senator John McCain, a war veteran, and was accused of criticizing his own generals in excerpts of a forthcoming book titled “Rage,” by Bob Woodward.

“It’s bad enough that President Trump publicly ridicules American heroes like Senator McCain and others who were captured on the battlefield. He inexplicably promotes the Confederate flag but fails to fly the POW/MIA flag,” said Democratic Senator Jack Reed, a co-sponsor of the bill. “It’s part of a pattern of disrespect by President Trump toward those who honorably served our nation.”

Reed, and fellow Democratic Senators Elizabeth Warren and Margaret Hassan, who also co-sponsored the bill, sent a letter to the White House on Thursday requesting that it reconsider the flag’s relocation.

“This decision to abruptly move the POW/MIA Flag from atop the White House to an area that is apparently not visible to the public may violate federal law and does not appropriately honor the service and sacrifices of American prisoners of war, missing servicemembers, and their families,” the letter reads.

The White House defended the change of venue but did not offer a reason for it.

“President Trump dedicated a POW/MIA memorial site earlier this year on the White House grounds to forever remember our heroic service members who were prisoners of war or missing in action,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said. “The President selected a site on the Southwest corner of the South Lawn for this prominent and sacred memorial, which is visible to all those who visit the White House, that features the POW/MIA flag,” he added.

The black and white flag, which reads “you are not forgotten,” depicts a man beneath a guard tower gazing down at a barbed wire fence. Roughly 82,000 American servicemembers are still missing since World War Two.

U.S. law requires the flag to be displayed in a “manner designed to ensure visibility to the public.” In its current position, it

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