Kick-start your veggie garden with Simply Green digital magazine



a bowl of fruit and vegetable salad


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The much-loved Simply Green digital magazine has been relaunched with its first edition – which looks at food gardening – going live Friday.

Editor Vivian Warby says she and her team are excited to bring the eco-conscious magazine back at a time when there is a growing number of people becoming more aware of the importance of living a sustainable life.

The team chose “growing your own food” as the theme for the first edition because “the appetite for urban food gardening has outlasted lockdown level 5 and today there are avid urban gardeners eating from their bounty planted in hard lockdown and new gardeners planting for the future”.

“We, at Simply Green, are thrilled about this positive sustainable element – an offshoot of the pandemic and we wanted to offer a simple guide to those wanting to start out on the journey,” says Warby.

“I hope you will find the magazine inspirational and empowering, as we start this journey together to make this a better, kinder and more sustainable world.”

In this edition – launched to coincide with the country’s celebration of Garden Day on Sunday – you will learn the basics of growing your own veggies in your backyard or on your balcony with topics ranging from composting to raised beds to vermiculture and permaculture to what to plant now.

“We have also included some delicious recipes to show you how simple it is to go from garden to plate.”

The magazine features The African Cookbook author Portia Mbau and her daughter Lumai de Smidt of the famous Instagram account @food.of.africa – on their garden-to-plate journey; and also delicious garden-to-plate recipes from well-known author/chef Sophia Lindop – author of the Lebanese cookbook Going Home. Amateur gardener Lieneke Dennis also takes us through a personal account of her entire lockdown kitchen garden journey from start to finish.

Elaborating on the Simply Green magazine Warby says it is a digital magazine, with a newsletter, a Simply Green members club and Facebook and Instagram accounts.

“It is aimed at the eco-conscious and green-minded consumer and industry as well as those wanting to live more sustainably and kindly on the planet and looking for ways to do this.”

Read the Simply Green magazine here.

Going forward, readers can expect the magazine to delve into topics such as green living; green homes; eco-friendly clothing; solar and wind energy; hemp and cannabis’ s future; living off the grid; dealing with water scarcity and climate change, among others. They also call on readers and eco-warriors to join them on the journey.

“We are really wanting to form partnerships and affiliations with our fellow eco-warriors and those leading the way in creating a sustainable planet.”

Please contact [email protected] or Features Editor [email protected] to see how we can work together.

“We hope to cover important discussions with industry leaders in bumper issues and we hope to show you how to live

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Make it a tasty fall by planting your own veggie garden with root crops, garlic and greens | Home/Garden

Now that we are moving into the cooler weather of October, it’s time to start seriously thinking about your fall vegetable garden.

If you don’t keep your vegetable garden productive through the winter, you are missing out on some of the most delicious vegetables we can grow. There is an amazing selection that can only be grown here during the cool season from October to May.

Another reason for putting in a fall vegetable garden now is the mild weather. No matter how much you love gardening, you have to admit that it’s more enjoyable when the daytime highs are in the 70s rather than the 90s. And during the cool season, we generally have fewer insect, disease and weed problems to deal with compared to summer gardens.

Make your bed

Whether you are planting into an existing vegetable garden or starting a new one, you must pay careful attention to bed preparation to ensure success. Before planting, do a thorough job of removing any weeds that may have grown in the bed, or remove existing turf if this is a new bed. Spray existing weeds or turf with glyphosate herbicide to kill the weeds before removing them. Check the label for waiting periods between treating and planting.

Turn the soil to a depth of 8 inches and spread a 2- to 4-inch layer of organic matter over the bed (compost, composted or processed manure, soil conditioner, grass clippings). Sprinkle a general purpose fertilizer over the organic matter following package directions. For more specific information on what fertilizer to use, have your soil tested through your local LSU AgCenter Extension office. Finally, thoroughly incorporate everything into the soil of bed.

If you prefer to garden in raised beds, which are generally less labor-intensive and easier to manage, kill and remove any weeds or lawn grass growing (use glyphosate) where the beds will be built. Build the raised beds about 8 to 12 inches deep and 3- to 4-feet wide (your choice of materials, pressure treated lumber, brick, cinder blocks, etc.). The length is up to you.

Fill them with a blended topsoil or garden soil mix you purchase in bags from local nurseries or in bulk from local soil companies. Incorporate fertilizer into the soil, but you generally will not need to add organic matter to a typical topsoil or garden soil mix.



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It’s time to plant broccoli into the fall vegetable garden. Related vegetables include cauliflower, kale, romanesco, kohlrabi and collards.




Cole crops

Cole is the old term for cabbage (as in coleslaw — cabbage salad). Cole crops include cabbage and several other related vegetables.

Broccoli is an easy-to-grow and productive fall vegetable. Transplants available at area nurseries may be planted now through late-October, spacing plants 12 to 18 inches apart in rows or beds. The 12-inch spacing will produce smaller heads but total production is greater.

Broccoli heads are harvested when the largest flower buds in the head are about the size of the head

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In the Garden: New veggie gardeners share triumphs and tribulations

Did you grow your first vegetable garden this year? Well done! Even if you experienced some problems or frustrations, I hope there were enough positive aspects to make you want to do it again next year.

I recently asked new gardeners on Facebook how they fared and received a lot of interesting replies. Before I proceed with those, I want to emphasize that no gardener has ever had a “perfect” garden on their first try. Come to think of it, I’ve been growing veggies for ages, and I don’t think I’ve ever had everything go according to plan. Do I still love it? You bet.

Vegetable gardening is a learning experience: You build on that experience by repeating your successes, talking to others about the challenges you’ve encountered and making adjustments each year. It should feel satisfying to grow vegetables. If you ate a homegrown tomato for the first time, you know it was worth the effort right there.

Here are some of the comments I’ve heard:

One new gardener realized he hadn’t spaced his plants properly, which impacted their growth. It’s always a good idea to follow the spacing recommendations on seed packets or plant tags. When plants are crowded, they have to fight for sunlight, moisture and nutrients. Stressed plants are often targeted by bugs.

A lot of folks were frustrated that our cold, wet spring affected their plants’ production. That’s one of those things we can’t control, but you might feel better knowing you weren’t alone. I should have waited a bit longer to plant my warm-season crops; others mentioned they probably planted theirs a bit too soon, as well. We should all wait until the danger of frost has passed and remember to harden off the seedlings before planting day by slowly acclimating them to outdoor temperatures and the intensity of the sunlight.

New and experienced gardeners alike commented on how difficult it was to find basic gardening supplies such as seeds and tools. While I know that was frustrating, it’s fantastic to have so many new gardeners. I’ve long maintained everyone should know how to grow their own food, and a lot of folks began that journey this year. Most garden centers and online sources are back on track now.

I heard positive comments, too. One couple said their crops produced so well, they’re already sketching out next year’s garden and looking through seed catalogs. Now that is organized, and I’m very impressed. Another person has appreciated the distraction that gardening has provided: “It has kept me centered and sane during these difficult times.”

Many people dealt with insect problems on their plants, which is always discouraging. The first step is to get them identified, then learn about organic solutions for controlling them. Experienced gardeners are great resources, as are our local Master Gardener programs; refer to the information box for ways to contact them.

A frequent frustration of new gardeners was that their gardens got out of control, making it difficult for them to

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Five tips on starting a fall veggie garden, including how to get transplants, soil delivered – Food and Dining – Austin American-Statesman

We seem to have an earlier introduction to fall than usual, with slightly cooler temperatures and rain in the first half of September rather than the second. Sometimes, we don’t get those hints of fall until October.

With so many fall events canceled, many of us are looking for ways to stay active at home, which might mean starting a fall vegetable garden for the first time. Whether you’re a true novice or returning to gardening after a break, here are five Austin-centric tips for getting started.

1. You’re gonna need good soil. Don’t rely on the dirt that’s already in your backyard. Pick up several bags of gardening soil and at least one bag of compost. Add a few scoopfuls of compost to each raised bed and then do that again in a few months, around the base of the plants.

2. Start some plants with seeds but use transplants for others. Carrots, cilantro, lettuce and radishes are best started from seed, but I like using already established transplants for brassicas, including broccoli and cauliflower. Beets, kale, chard and other greens you can start from seeds or transplants. (You can start some of those transplants yourself inside in those black seedling trays.) It’s not too late to throw late-season peppers and tomatoes in the ground, but those should be already established plants. Here’s a Central Texas guide for when to plant what.

3. You can get many garden supplies delivered, including transplants. In Austin, Lone Star Nursery used to be a wholesale nursery, but now they are focusing exclusively on delivering to home gardeners, and they are also already selling fall transplants that aren’t yet for sale at other gardening stores. There are more garden supply stores than you might think in the Austin area, but not all of them have fall vegetable transplants this early in the season.

4. Keep those seedlings moist. We still have temperatures in the upper 80s and low 90s, which is tough on these cool weather-loving plants, so make sure you water every day in the morning. Many plants also wouldn’t mind a spritz again in the evening. The upside about starting a fall garden early is that you can start to harvest some of these greens and veggies in October and November, but the downside is they need a little extra TLC to get started. The extra fragile ones, like lettuce and carrots, might need a little shade if we get some extra hot afternoons later this month.

5. Ask for help. Gardeners love to give advice, and farmers do, too, especially if you’re buying produce from them at the farmers market. Some farmers markets, including Barton Creek Farmers Market on Saturdays where Rasmey’s Garden sells veggie transplants, have booths were you can buy transplants and chat with a grower to get more tips specific to what you want to grow. As a result of the coronavirus, many gardening groups and experts are hosting virtual classes this fall to help get you

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Five tips on starting a fall veggie garden, including how to get transplants, soil delivered – Food and Dining – Austin 360

We seem to have an earlier introduction to fall than usual, with slightly cooler temperatures and rain in the first half of September rather than the second. Sometimes, we don’t get those hints of fall until October.

With so many fall events canceled, many of us are looking for ways to stay active at home, which might mean starting a fall vegetable garden for the first time. Whether you’re a true novice or returning to gardening after a break, here are five Austin-centric tips for getting started.

1. You’re gonna need good soil. Don’t rely on the dirt that’s already in your backyard. Pick up several bags of gardening soil and at least one bag of compost. Add a few scoopfuls of compost to each raised bed and then do that again in a few months, around the base of the plants.

2. Start some plants with seeds but use transplants for others. Carrots, cilantro, lettuce and radishes are best started from seed, but I like using already established transplants for brassicas, including broccoli and cauliflower. Beets, kale, chard and other greens you can start from seeds or transplants. (You can start some of those transplants yourself inside in those black seedling trays.) It’s not too late to throw late-season peppers and tomatoes in the ground, but those should be already established plants. Here’s a Central Texas guide for when to plant what.

3. You can get many garden supplies delivered, including transplants. In Austin, Lone Star Nursery used to be a wholesale nursery, but now they are focusing exclusively on delivering to home gardeners, and they are also already selling fall transplants that aren’t yet for sale at other gardening stores. There are more garden supply stores than you might think in the Austin area, but not all of them have fall vegetable transplants this early in the season.

4. Keep those seedlings moist. We still have temperatures in the upper 80s and low 90s, which is tough on these cool weather-loving plants, so make sure you water every day in the morning. Many plants also wouldn’t mind a spritz again in the evening. The upside about starting a fall garden early is that you can start to harvest some of these greens and veggies in October and November, but the downside is they need a little extra TLC to get started. The extra fragile ones, like lettuce and carrots, might need a little shade if we get some extra hot afternoons later this month.

5. Ask for help. Gardeners love to give advice, and farmers do, too, especially if you’re buying produce from them at the farmers market. Some farmers markets, including Barton Creek Farmers Market on Saturdays where Rasmey’s Garden sells veggie transplants, have booths were you can buy transplants and chat with a grower to get more tips specific to what you want to grow. As a result of the coronavirus, many gardening groups and experts are hosting virtual classes this fall to help get you

Read more

Fall is coming: Prep now for the veggie garden with a mix of transitional and cool-season plants | Home/Garden

When it comes to vegetable gardening, understanding the seasons and the proper time to plant various crops is so important to success. Although it certainly doesn’t feel like it, we are gradually transitioning into fall — and that affects what we can plant.

Cool fronts may begin to make their way into our area this month, bringing welcome relief from the heat. Still, daytime highs regularly reach the 80s and 90s well into October. During this transition period, warm- and cool-season vegetables rub elbows in the garden.

September is almost like a second spring when it comes to the vegetables we can plant now. Familiar crops planted back in March and April, like summer squash, winter squash, cucumber, tomato, pepper and bush snap beans, can be planted again now. While bush snap beans can be planted through September, the rest of the crops need to be planted immediately to give them time to produce before freezes hit. This applies to south shore gardeners — for north shore gardeners, planting this late is riskier.



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Plant now to grow a fall crop of peppers and tomatoes.

Cindy Camp, left, who co-owns Clinton’s Happy Hills Farm with husband Roger Camp, makes a sale to Baton Rouge’s Anne Maverick, right, as they do business amidst a colorful display of the farm’s vegetables early Saturday morning at Big River Economic and Agricultural Development Alliance’s (BREADA) weekly Red Stick Farmers Market, August 24, 2019 on Main Street. The farm grows all-organic produce– ‘in the dirt,’ laughed Cindy, ‘people ask.’ ‘ Their crops include yellow squash, tomatoes, zuchinni, a plethora of peppers, some sweet, some spicy, and eggplants including a tiny ‘Fairytale’ variety picked when just several inches long. In the coming weeks, broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower will begin to show up on their table, she said.




While we generally plant squash and cucumbers seeds directly in the garden, at this point, it would be best to plant transplants if you can find them at local nurseries, garden centers and feed and seed stores. Definitely use transplants to plant your tomatoes and peppers.

We also begin to plant cool-season vegetables this time of the year, like broccoli, Swiss chard, mustard greens and bunching onions. But this is still quite early in their growing season, and there is no hurry to get them planted right away.

STARTING THE GARDEN

If you don’t have a vegetable garden, now is a great time to start one. Site selection is critical. All vegetables produce best with full sun, so the site should receive a minimum of six hours of direct sunlight. All-day sun is preferable,

Be sure to prepare new or existing beds properly before planting. Clear the site of all weeds or old, finished vegetable plants. Turn the soil with a shovel or tiller to a depth of at least eight inches, and spread a two- to four-inch layer of organic matter over the tilled soil — chopped leaves, grass clippings, composted manure or compost

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