A look at gun safety after stray bullet hits 8-year-old in Garden Valley

“Every year we have a couple of people that are hit by accidental discharges,” said Boise County Sheriff’s Cpl. David Gomez.

GARDEN VALLEY, Idaho — The man charged with accidentally discharging his gun, after an 8-year-old boy in Boise County was struck by a stray bullet, is now expected in court later this month. 

The boy, named LJ, was lying in his bed Friday night, according to his dad, when a bullet from a neighbor’s gun shot through the window, a wall, and a pillow before striking the boy in his hand, face and neck. LJ is now back home and recovering. 

Prosecutors charged 41-year-old Brandon L. Nelson with injuring another by careless handling and discharge of firearms.

The incident prompted the question, how common are accidental discharges like this? 

RELATED: 8-year-old hit by stray bullet in Garden Valley: ‘He won’t be the same’

“I think every year we have a couple of accidental discharges and every year we have a couple of people that are hit by accidental discharges,” said Boise County Sheriff’s Cpl. David Gomez. “So, you want to put in as many safety mechanisms as you can. Number one, always pretend like [the gun is] loaded. Number two, keep it pointed in a safe direction always. And number three, keep it secured so that you know who’s controlling that gun.”

He added that, just like driving, it’s not good to be under the influence when operating a car and it’s not good to be under the influence and handling a gun as well because it greatly affects decision-making.

In this particular case, the parents of the 8-year-old told KTVB, Nelson was drunk when he discharged the gun Friday night. Nelson is neighbors with LJ’s dad. However, investigators have not yet released if the 41-year-old was under the influence at the time. 

KTVB has also learned the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives or ATF are aware of what happened in Garden Valley. 

Nelson is scheduled to be in court on Oct. 19.

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8-year-old hit by stray bullet in Garden Valley: ‘He won’t be the same’

The young victim was airlifted to Boise for treatment, but is now recovering at home.

GARDEN VALLEY, Idaho — A boy is recovering after being shot by a stray bullet in Boise County Friday night.

According to the Boise County Sheriff’s Office, the shooting happened at 11 p.m. Friday at a home in Garden Valley. The bullet struck the 8-year-old in the hand and neck, the sheriff said.

The injured child, LJ, was airlifted to a hospital in Boise for treatment, and later released to recover at home. The boy’s wound is not believed to be life-threatening.

“He won’t be the same, but he’s doing alright right now,”  Jason Petrick, LJ’s father said. “His mother told me the other day that right now he’s scared of getting shot again and that really hurts.”

Deputies investigated the shooting with help from Idaho State Police, and ultimately charged 41-year-old Brandon L. Nelson with injuring another by careless handling and discharge of firearms. The misdemeanor charge is punishable by up to six months in jail.

Nelson is the neighbor of LJ’s father. Petrick told KTVB, he would like to see a more reasonable charge for Nelson and that he be held responsible.

“If you’re drunk and driving a car, no matter what the circumstances are, if you kill someone you’re going to prison for a long time, if you’re drunk and playing with a gun you’ve taken pretty much the same responsibility, you’ve taken your life and other people’s life into your hands,” Petrick said.

KTVB reached out to Boise County Sheriff’s to find out if Nelson was under the influence when this happened. In a statement, the Sheriff said, “we are not releasing anymore information pending the outcome of the investigation.” 

Further charges are being reviewed in the case, and the investigation is ongoing. 


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Hillicon Valley: House panel says Intelligence Community not equipped to address Chinese threats

Welcome to Hillicon Valley, The Hill’s newsletter detailing all you need to know about the tech and cyber news from Capitol Hill to Silicon Valley. If you don’t already, be sure to sign up for our newsletter with this LINK.



a person sitting at a table in front of a sign: Hillicon Valley: House panel says Intelligence Community not equipped to address Chinese threats | House approves bill to send cyber resources to state, local governments


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Hillicon Valley: House panel says Intelligence Community not equipped to address Chinese threats | House approves bill to send cyber resources to state, local governments

Welcome! Follow our cyber reporter, Maggie Miller (@magmill95), and tech reporter, Chris Mills Rodrigo (@chrisismills), for more coverage.

THE IC GETS A LESS THAN STELLAR REVIEW: A House committee warned Wednesday that the U.S. intelligence community is not equipped to handle evolving threats from China in the fields of technology and politics.

The House Intelligence Committee detailed its findings in an unclassified summary of a report, approved for release by the panel by voice vote, that delves into the intelligence community’s (IC) capabilities to respond to Chinese threats.

“The United States’ intelligence community has not sufficiently adapted to a changing geopolitical and technological environment increasingly shaped by a rising China and the growing importance of interlocking non-military transnational threats, such as global health, economic security, and climate change,” the committee wrote in its summary.

“Absent a significant realignment of resources, the U.S. government and intelligence community will fail to achieve the outcomes required to enable continued U.S. competition with China on the global stage for decades to come, and to protect the U.S. health and security,” the committee added.

The report said the IC places “insufficient emphasis and focus” on “soft threats,” such as viral pandemics and climate change, and that if the IC did not modernize systems to increase focus on machine learning and artificial intelligence, national security could be undermined.

On the technological front, “China’s continued advancements in cyber and space-based systems also introduce the likelihood of entirely new domains of conflict in the event of a contingency,” which could serve to “extend the battlefield to our political discourse, mobile devices, and the very infrastructure that modern digital communication and communities rely upon,” the lawmakers wrote.

Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) acknowledged the shortcomings laid bare by the report, saying in a statement that “our nation’s intelligence agencies have a lot of work to do to fully address the challenge posed by China.”

Read more here.

MORE CHINA CONCERNS: The House GOP’s China task force unveiled its full report laying out hundreds of recommendations and legislative suggestions to combat threats posed by the Chinese Communist Party on Wednesday.

The report includes more than 400 policy recommendations to address issues ranging from national security concerns, human rights violations, problems with the supply chain, Beijing’s missteps in its handling of the pandemic and China’s overall expanding influence on the world stage.

The task force – which is made up of 15 GOP lawmakers who sit on 11 different committees – was initially slated to be bipartisan before Democrats ultimately opted out before its launch in May.

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DRIVERS TO

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Medical examiner identifies body of man shot in Cleveland’s Garden Valley neighborhood

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Officials released the identity of the 37-year-old man who was shot and killed Thursday in the city’s Garden Valley neighborhood.



a car parked on the side of a building: Cleveland police arrested a man in connection with a shooting that killed one man and injured another.


© Adam Ferrise, cleveland.com/cleveland.com/TNS
Cleveland police arrested a man in connection with a shooting that killed one man and injured another.

Keith Mitchell of Cleveland .

Died in the shooting that happened about 10 p.m. On Colfax Road near the Minnie Street intersection, a Cleveland police spokeswoman Sgt. Jennifer Ciaccia said. He suffered several gunshot wounds to the head, torso and extremities, the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner’s office said in a statement

Police responded to a call of a loud party and a man being shot. Police arrived and found the man lying on the sidewalk with several gunshot wounds, Ciaccia said.

The officers provided first aid to Mitchell before paramedics took him to MetroHealth where he was later pronounced dead.

No arrests have been made in the shooting.

———

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Yarra Valley Garden Party | Your Place

Springtime is usually the time to hit the road, but this year we will have to delay travelling to places like the Yarra Valley until later in the season. That doesn’t mean we can’t celebrate the warmer weather among the vines, as the Yarra Valley is hosting a virtual garden party, and everyone is invited.

The free garden party will be held between October 2-4, and it will include things like virtual cooking classes, live yoga, virtual tours, garden workshops, wedding suggestions, cocktail classes, wine tastings, gardening tips and more. The events will all be virtual, but they’re brought to you from the makers, innovators and creators of the Yarra Valley, who will showcase their businesses and their knowhow. 

Virtual is great and all, but how do you get your mitts on real-life Yarra Valley wine, perfect for spring? You can buy a Garden Party Pack, filled with six Yarra Valley wines, recipes, seeds for planting, flowers for decorating and other goodies. You can enjoy the virtual garden party without buying the pack, but everything’s better with wine, isn’t it?

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Man shot dead in Cleveland’s Garden Valley neighborhood, police say

CLEVELAND, Ohio — A 37-year-old man is dead after a shooting Thursday in the city’s Garden Valley neighborhood.

The man has not yet been identified in the shooting that happened about 10 p.m. in the area of Colfax Road and Minnie Street, Cleveland police spokeswoman Sgt. Jennifer Ciaccia said.

Police received a call about a loud party and a man being shot. Police found the man lying on the sidewalk with several gunshot wounds, Ciaccia said.

Police rendered aid to the man before he was taken to MetroHealth. He was later pronounced dead at the hospital, Ciaccia said.

Investigators tried to interview witnesses but all of them said they only heard the shots, police said.

Police have made no arrests in the shooting.

Anyone with information is asked to call detectives at 216-623-5464.

Read more crime stories on cleveland.com:

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Ohio Investigative Unit: Euclid bar cited in violating coronavirus-related health orders

City of Cleveland expresses condolences for Daniel Ripepi, killed in Interstate 480 accident

University Heights investigating string of car thefts over two-week period, police say

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Go Now evacuation ordered for Garden Valley Road area

Register-Guard

A prompt response from the Goshen Fire District and a timely assist from Mother Nature in the form of torrential rain helped stop a fast-moving grass fire that prompted a Level 3 evacuation order Wednesday.

The fire, which started around 5 p.m. Wednesday, was fully contained and evacuations cleared by 9 p.m., according to information provided by Pleasant Hill Goshen Fire & Rescue Fire Chief Andrew Smith.

Estimated to be between 6 and 8 acres in size, the fire only damaged one small outbuilding, Smith said. No homes were lost.

The responding fire fighters did receive air support from the nearby Holiday Farm Fire, which Smith said was instrumental in stopping the forward progress of the fire. Multiple ground resources also contributed to the swift response, he said.

Rain will continue to help with any lingering hot spots Wednesday, however there is a very firm perimeter, Smith said in the release.

The fire call came in at at 5:15 p.m. for the 34900 block of Seavey Loop Road, according to the computer assisted dispatch (CAD).

The fire appeared to have started along Seavey Loop Road, with westerly winds spreading fire in dry grass. People in the area reported seeing flames as high as 40 feet.

The Level 3 “go now” evacuation  notice was issued a little after 6 p.m. for Garden Valley Road area from Garden Valley Road to Drummond Drive near Mt. Pisgah. Lane County canceled the evacuation order at about 6:45 p.m., telling residents they could return home.

The scene was cleared a little after 8 p.m. Wednesday, according to dispatch records.

The cause of the fire is under investigation, Smith said.

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Hillicon Valley: Murky TikTok deal raises questions about China’s role | Twitter investigating automated image previews over apparent algorithmic bias

Welcome to Hillicon Valley, The Hill’s newsletter detailing all you need to know about the tech and cyber news from Capitol Hill to Silicon Valley. If you don’t already, be sure to sign up for our newsletter with this LINK.



a sign on the side of a building: Hillicon Valley: Murky TikTok deal raises questions about China's role | Twitter investigating automated image previews over apparent algorithmic bias | House approves bill making hacking federal voting systems a crime


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Hillicon Valley: Murky TikTok deal raises questions about China’s role | Twitter investigating automated image previews over apparent algorithmic bias | House approves bill making hacking federal voting systems a crime

Welcome! Follow our cyber reporter, Maggie Miller (@magmill95), and tech reporter, Chris Mills Rodrigo (@chrisismills), for more coverage.

TIKTOK TUSSLE: A deal to avert a U.S. ban on TikTok appears to have been reached over the weekend, but several questions remain about the contours of the pending agreement.

The most pressing is what role the short-form video app’s China-based parent company, ByteDance, will have in the newly formed entity TikTok Global.

President Trump suggested Monday that the deal could be in jeopardy if Oracle and Walmart – the two American companies involved in the proposal – do not have full control of the new TikTok.

“And if we find that they don’t have total control, then we’re not going to approve the deal,” he said during an appearance on “Fox & Friends.”

One of the next steps in the approval process includes a review by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS).

Without a term sheet being public, it is difficult to know the exact breakdown of the agreement, which was tentatively approved just before a Commerce Department order would have barred TikTok from appearing in U.S. app stores.

But from what is known, it appears that the deal falls far short of the full-on sale of TikTok to an American company that Trump originally called for in August.

Together, Oracle and Walmart will take only a 20 percent stake in the new company, TikTok said in a statement over the weekend.

According to ByteDance, other U.S.-based TikTok investors like Sequoia Capital and General Atlantic will stay on in the newly formed company, which has an estimated value of between $50 billion and $60 billion.

Even with the financial stakes of four U.S. companies, it is difficult to envision a scenario where ByteDance entirely removes itself from involvement in such a successful video app.

In a statement Monday, ByteDance emphasized it will remain in control of the new TikTok business and, crucially, the recommendation algorithm that makes the platform so popular.

That position was directly contradicted by Oracle executive vice president Ken Glueck, who said Monday that “Americans will be the majority and ByteDance will have no ownership in TikTok Global.”

The discrepancy may be explained by ByteDance’s ownership of TikTok Ltd., a business incorporated in the Cayman Islands that currently owns TikTok’s American operations.

Read more here.

ALGORITHMIC BIAS TEST CASE: Twitter is investigating the algorithm it uses to crop pictures for its mobile platform after several users pointed out a tendency to zero in on white faces.

Controversy over

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Club spotlight: Poway Valley Garden Club finding ways to blossom amid pandemic

The Poway Valley Garden Club presidents said the club is finding ways to meet up and share members’ love of gardening despite COVID-19 restrictions.

Carolyn Larsen and Stephanie Persson took over as co-presidents in June.

The club was founded in 1961 and works to promote gardening within the community, as well as to improve and beautify the community, Larsen said. It also is “majorly into education,” she added.

“It’s probably one of the most active garden clubs in the community,” Larsen said.

Health restrictions have changed club meetings, but the members are making the effort to stay social and involved. The club’s monthly meetings have transitioned to Zoom, including classes and guest speakers, Larsen said.

She said an example is the club holding an online gardening class for members via Zoom with a PowerPoint presentation. The following day, a club member opened her home garden to small groups of four to six people at a time, so club members could visit and see the garden. She did this for a week, Larsen said. The club members received clippings from the member’s garden and were able to have a hands-on mini-class, Persson added.

“We’re trying to navigate this pandemic the best we can,” Persson said.

While the club’s monthly, in-person meetings are typically three hours long, Larsen and Persson said people cannot sit in front of a computer screen for that long, so the Zoom meetings are about 1 ½ hours, with 30 minutes of club business and an hour for the guest speaker.

The club has 127 members, something Larsen and Persson said they find encouraging.

“We’re encouraged by the club being alive, and thriving, and having new members join during a pandemic,” Persson said.

It has grown in membership over the past 10 years, Larsen said. She attributes the growth to how active the club is and people wanting to be involved with that activity.

Larsen and Persson said their motto for the club this year is “Preservation, Persistence and Possibility.” This reflects their desire to preserve the club’s beautification and community service projects, persist with providing interesting and educational topics and outings, and create endless possibilities for the club and the local community, they said.

The club is involved with many projects around the community, including maintaining several gardens at Old Poway Park. These are the gardens outside Templars Hall, the orchard, the butterfly garden, the Nelson House flower garden and volunteer appreciation garden. It also maintains the Lake Poway Rose Garden.

Members also work hands-on with residents of Cadence at Poway Gardens, a memory care community in Poway. On the fourth Friday of each month, members engage in horticultural activities with residents with Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia.

Some club members are also involved with the Poway Valley Youth Garden Club, which supports several local school gardens and works with students.

The club holds several fundraisers every year, in order to raise money for scholarships and donate to Penny for Pines, which replants trees in

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