Supreme Court nomination live updates

Updated September 26, 2020

Election 2020: What to know

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Midtown-Hell’s Kitchen, NY Coronavirus Updates & News For September 25



Midtown-Hell’s Kitchen, NY |
1d

For the first time in over a century, crowds won’t flock to Times Square for New Year’s Eve—but the ball will still drop, organizers said.

A general view during New Year's Eve 2017 in Times Square on December 31, 2016 in New York City.
A general view during New Year’s Eve 2017 in Times Square on December 31, 2016 in New York City. (Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images)

MIDTOWN MANHATTAN, NY — For the first time in more than a century, crowds will not flock to Times Square for New Year’s Eve this year, organizers of the annual event said Wednesday, announcing that the pandemic will force the ball drop to become a mostly virtual occasion — with some limited in-person components…. Read more



Mount Vernon, NY |
14h

Many families skipped or postponed vaccines and visits during the pandemic. Though COVID-19 is still spreading, catching up is critical.

Consumer Reports has no relationship with advertisers on this site…. Read more



New York City, NY |
11h

Mayor Bill de Blasio framed a broad vision of New York City emerging from the coronavirus crisis as a global hub of health care innovation.

NEW YORK CITY — Mayor Bill de Blasio laid out a grand vision of public health investment driving New York City’s recovery from the coronavirus crisis. … Read more



New York City, NY |
1d

Met Opera Cancels Season | 4-Year-Old’s Body Found In River | ‘RBG Way’ Could Come To UWS

Share-worthy stories from the New York City Patch network to talk about tonight.These NYC Schools Had Coronavirus Cases Reported Over The Weekend… Read more



New York City, NY |
1d

Pandemic limitations have already reshaped the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade and Times Square New Year’s Eve, but other events will change.

NEW YORK CITY — Outdoor events in New York City, including some iconic traditions, will take a different form at least through New Year’s Eve.Mayor Bill de Blasio on Wednesday extended coronavirus restrictions until Dec. 31 on events permitted by the city’s parks, police and Street Activity Permit Office.In plain English, that means don’t expect your favorite crowded holiday public events to go forward as if the pandemic isn’t… Read more



New York City, NY |
1d

Three schools were closed — but have since reopened — out of 21 with confirmed cases between Sept. 18 to 21.

NEW YORK CITY — Staff at 21 New York City schools tested positive for coronavirus in days running up to in-person learning’s return, officials said.The tests prompted the temporary closures of three city schools — P.S. 165 in Manhattan and J.H.S. 131 Albert Einstein and I.S. 219 New Ventures, both in the Bronx, according to Department of Education officials.Those schools, which each had two positive cases within a week, have since… Read more



New York City, NY |
1d

COVID-19 surges in several Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods are bigger problems than officials first realized, Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

NEW YORK CITY — New data shows coronavirus upticks in Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods are a bigger problem than officials first realized, Mayor Bill

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Election 2020 live updates: Biden makes appeal to Black voters in N.C. as Trump stages White House events

Speaking in Charlotte, on Wednesday, Biden focused on the economic vulnerability of African Americans, outlining his previous proposals for racial equity while pledging to elevate the Civil Rights Division if he is elected.

At what was billed as a “Black Economic Summit,” he addressed the growing racial unrest around the country and the potential to spur change in public policy.

“Average people have gone, ‘My lord, holy mackerel. I didn’t know it was this bad,’” Biden said.

During his remarks, a grand jury in Jefferson County, Ky., indicted a former police officer on three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor during a drug raid in March. Biden did not mention the case directly.

Biden talked about infusing more money into historically Black colleges and universities, and touted a plan that would allow anyone from a family making less than $125,000 to go to a public college for free.

At one point, he stopped and said he kept a list of his major funding proposals and how he’d pay for them, pulling a notecard out of his pocket. He argued for tax code changes that would raise taxes on corporations and the wealthy — but he also tried to make clear he wasn’t going as far, politically or rhetorically, as his former Democratic primary rival Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.).

“You think I’m making it like, you know … Bernie Sanders, ‘Billionaires are bad.’ That’s not the problem,” Biden said, casting his proposal as a more modest increase in the tax rate for the wealthiest Americans to 39.4 percent. “I’m not trying to punish anybody. It’s time everybody pay their fair share.”

At the end, Biden said he would allow one more question, saying with a laugh, “I could really do yes or no if you ask me an easy question.” The question was about how the Department of Justice would operate differently under him.

“This has been the most corrupt administration to modern American history,” Biden said. “The Justice Department’s turned into the president’s private law firm.”

On cases and prosecutions, Biden said, “the Justice Department will be totally independent of me.” But he said that the Civil Rights division would be elevated and would have “a direct office within the White House.”

“I’d make sure there’s a combination of the Civil Rights Division having more direct authority inside the Justice Department and be able to investigate, than in fact it has now,” Biden said.

“But I get asked the following question, ‘If in fact you get elected, would you prosecute Trump?’” Biden added. “The answer is I’m not going to pursue prosecuting anybody. I’m going to do what the Justice Department says should be done.”

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Garden City, NY Coronavirus Updates & News For September 23



North Fork, NY |
1h

Don’t miss a minute of the fun with Patch’s guide on where to go this fall for pumpkin picking, while still adhering to COVID-19 protocols.

Pumpkin-picking is unfolding across Long Island, with an eye toward social distancing.
Pumpkin-picking is unfolding across Long Island, with an eye toward social distancing. (Courtesy Krupski Farms.)

LONG ISLAND, NY — The fall season means foliage, outdoor activities — and pumpkins. Pumpkin picking is a tried-and-true tradition, a time for family photographs and memories. And, with Gov. Andrew Cuomo announcing in September that the pumpkin picking, mazes and haunted mansions could open with coronavirus protocols, the annual fun is unfolding across Long Island…. Read more



Farmingdale, NY |
22h

We all know someone who’s making a difference. Let’s help share their amazing stories! Presented by Ring.

FARMINGDALE, NY — When times are tough, heroes emerge. We all know someone who’s making a difference right now as we live through unprecedented and changing times…. Read more



Hicksville, NY |
22h

A staff member tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Students have shifted to remote learning.

HICKSVILLE, NY — A Hicksville school has closed and shifted to remote learning for two weeks after a staff member tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. … Read more



Deer Park-North Babylon, NY |
23h

The district will go full remote on Tuesday after a confirmed case of coronavirus was reported at the high school.

DEER PARK, NY — Deer Park High School will be closed on Tuesday after a confirmed case of coronavirus, Superintendent Jim Cummings announced in a letter to the community. … Read more



Port Washington, NY |
1d

A fourth case of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has been found in Port Washington. The building was forced to close.

PORT WASHINGTON, NY — Another Port Washington student has tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, and the school building will close Tuesday, officials said…. Read more



Great Neck, NY |
1d

Officials say a student tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. His classmates and teacher are quarantining.

GREAT NECK, NY — A Great Neck student has tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, and both teachers and classmates who shared a classroom with the student were transitioned to remote learning for two weeks, the district said…. Read more



Plainview, NY |
1d

An employee contracted the virus and tested positive last week, state records showed. The school remained open Monday.

PLAINVIEW, NY — A worker at a Plainview school tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, according to state records and district communications. … Read more

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5 bathroom updates that will stand the test of time

If, after being stuck at home for months on end, you are taking stock of your surroundings and looking for ways to spruce up the appearance or improve the functionality of your home, you are not alone. According to a report from Review Home Warranties, online searches related to home remodeling are up 84 percent this year. And small but achievable updates in bathrooms, such as tile, hardware or paint, are among the more popular projects, according to the report.

If you’re going to update a bathroom and you want your design choices to stand up over time, the first step is determining what styles will be timeless for you specifically.

“People tend to fall into one or two camps,” says interior designer Michael Winn of Winn Design and Build in Northern Virginia. “They want a very classic-looking bathroom, or they want something contemporary and spalike, like the Four Seasons.” Either way, for many people, the bathroom isn’t the place to get splashy with trends.

But what if you adore bold colors and patterns? “Sometimes, the most timeless things are the things that you love,” says Katy Harbin, a designer based in North Carolina. “There are people that redo their bathroom every 10 years,” and for them, choosing the paint color of the year and of-the-moment hardware might work.

For those who want to do it once and be done, though, Winn, Harbin and Boston-based interior designer Erin Gates, author of “Elements of Family Style,” agreed on five bathroom updates that are truly timeless.

An all-white palette

Whether you prefer a classic-looking bathroom or a spalike retreat, Winn says, “white doesn’t go out of style.” Think white paint, tile, countertops, vanities and textiles.

If you find yourself craving color, you can add it with window treatments and towels, Gates suggests, or wallpaper and art. “Just be wary of installing wallpaper in an often-used bathroom with a shower, as the steam can sometimes cause the paper to peel.”

Harbin likes white towels with a contrast trim “in a perky color.”

Choosing the right paint color can be tricky, Harbin says, so it’s important to order larger color samples from paint stores rather than relying on paint cards. “You can have an earthy bathroom, like a really pretty travertine … and if you put a stark white with it, it falls flat,” she says. A rich cream hue would work better, she recommends. If you can’t find large color samples, get a small pot and paint a poster board to see how it looks under your bathroom’s lighting. Put the paint next to tile and countertop samples to be certain they all work together.

Polished chrome is a classic finish that can be mixed with other materials. Here, it’s show on Rejuvenation’s Yaquina Cross Handle Widespread Bathroom Faucet. (Courtesy of Rejuvenation)
Polished chrome is a classic finish that can be mixed with other materials. Here, it’s show on Rejuvenation’s Yaquina Cross Handle Widespread Bathroom Faucet. (Courtesy of Rejuvenation)

Mixed metals

Blending two types of metals in the space can stand up better than going with one trendy finish throughout the room. In terms of particular metals, “polished nickel is

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Five bathroom updates that will help your space stand the test of time

If, after being stuck at home for months on end, you are taking stock of your surroundings and looking for ways to spruce up the appearance or improve the functionality of your home, you are not alone. According to a report from Review Home Warranties, online searches related to home remodeling are up 84% this year.

Small but achievable updates in bathrooms, such as tile, hardware or paint, are among the more popular projects, according to the report. If you’re going to update a bathroom and you want your design choices to stand up over time, the first step is determining what styles will be timeless for you specifically.

“People tend to fall into one or two camps,” interior designer Michael Winn of Winn Design and Build in Virginia said. “They want a very classic-looking bathroom, or they want something contemporary and spa-like, like the Four Seasons.” Translation: For many people, the bathroom might not be the place to get splashy with trends.

But what if you adore bold colors and patterns? “Sometimes, the most timeless things are the things that you love,” said Katy Harbin, a designer based in North Carolina. “There are people that redo their bathroom every 10 years,” and for them, choosing a paint color of the year and of-the-moment hardware might work.

For those who want to do it right and be done, though, Winn, Harbin and Boston-based interior designer Erin Gates, author of “Elements of Family Style,” agreed on five bathroom updates that are truly timeless.

An all-white palette

Whether you prefer a classic-looking bathroom or a spa-like retreat, Winn said, “white doesn’t go out of style.” Think white paint, tile, countertops, vanities and textiles.

If you find yourself craving color, you can add it with window treatments and towels, Gates suggests, or wallpaper and art. “Just be wary of installing wallpaper in an often-used bathroom with a shower, as the steam can sometimes cause the paper to peel.”

Harbin likes white towels with a contrast trim “in a perky color.”

Choosing the right paint color can be tricky, Harbin said, so it’s important to order larger color samples from paint stores rather than relying on paint cards. “You can have an earthy bathroom, like a really pretty travertine … and if you put a stark white with it, it falls flat, but rich creams” will work, she said.

If you can’t find larger samples, get a sample pot and paint a poster board to see how everything looks under your bathroom’s lighting. Put the paint next to tile and countertop samples to be certain they all work together.

Mixed metals

Blending two types of metals in the space can stand up better than going with one trendy finish throughout the room. In terms of particular metals, “polished nickel is timeless,” Winn said. Gates, too, prefers polished nickel; in her bathroom, she pairs it with a gold mirror.

When using two different metals (and no more than two), Harbin said to “repeat them enough,

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Live Updates: House Hearing On Homeland Threats : NPR

FBI Director Christopher Wray, pictured on Capitol Hill on Feb. 5, is briefing House members on security threats on Thursday.

Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images


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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

FBI Director Christopher Wray, pictured on Capitol Hill on Feb. 5, is briefing House members on security threats on Thursday.

Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

A House committee has convened a hearing on threats to the homeland with top intelligence and security officials — albeit with some notable absences.

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe is not appearing after recently announcing changes to how members of Congress would be briefed on election threats. In a statement on Wednesday, he reiterated that he does not intend to give broad briefings “in order to protect sources and methods,” although he said he still will talk with small groups of select lawmakers.

In August, Ratcliffe said he would not give any in-person briefings, but recently agreed to hold more limited face-to-face meetings.

The House Homeland Security Committee on Thursday is expected to hear from FBI Director Christopher Wray and the director of the National Counterterrorism Center, Christopher Miller. (Follow updates on the hearing here.)

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf was subpoenaed to appear, too. The department sought to send acting Deputy Secretary Ken Cuccinelli instead, but the committee rejected the request.

The status and duties of Wolf and Cuccinelli have been questioned by the watchdog agency Government Accountability Office, which opined last month that neither man is serving appropriately in his ostensible role with the agency because of irregularities involved with how they were named.

Cuccinelli said on Wednesday evening that the department’s position now is that Wolf, who has been performing the duties of DHS’s secretary for months and been an important deputy to President Trump, is a “pending nominee” for his job awaiting Senate confirmation. Accordingly, it would be inappropriate for him to appear before the House Homeland Security Committee on Wednesday, Cuccinelli said.

“In light of that precedent, DHS offered to accommodate [the panel’s] request to hear about threats. I had testimony prepared and had my schedule clear to show up at this morning’s hearing,” Cuccinelli said. “Instead, the committee majority decided that they would rather put on a show for the media. Instead of serving the American people and working to keep them safe, they would rather use the American people’s time and money to stage a political spectacle.”

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Covid-19 Tracker: Live Updates – The New York Times

Amid a stimulus impasse, a bipartisan group is offering a $1.5 trillion compromise.

A bipartisan group of 50 centrist lawmakers plans on Tuesday to present a $1.5 trillion plan to prop up the coronavirus-ravaged economy, making a last-ditch effort to break a stalemate on stimulus talks before November’s elections.

Members of the group — which calls itself the House Problem Solvers Caucus — concede privately that their framework stands little chance of becoming law. But the decision to offer it up publicly reflects frustration among rank-and-file lawmakers in both parties at the failure by their leaders to agree to another round of pandemic aid, and a reluctance to return home weeks before Election Day without cementing such help.

The proposal includes measures that enjoy bipartisan support, like reviving the popular Paycheck Protection Program for small businesses and direct checks of $1,200 or more for American taxpayers, as well as more contentious ones like new legal rights and protections for workers and their employers.

But the bulk of its proposed spending would fall somewhere in the middle of what Republicans and Democrats have championed. The measure would reinstate lapsed federal jobless aid at $450 per week for eight weeks, then replace up to $600 weekly in lost wages for an additional five weeks. That is more than Republicans wanted, but less than the flat, $600-a-week benefit that lapsed at the end of July, which Democrats have insisted must be extended in full. And the proposal would send $500 billion to strapped state and local governments, less than the nearly $1 trillion Democrats included in their $3.4 trillion stimulus plan that passed the House in May, but roughly double what the White House has signaled it could support.

In unveiling the plan, the group is seeking to send a signal to Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the lead White House negotiators — Mark Meadows, the chief of staff, and Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary — that there is ample common ground to be found in talks that have been dormant for weeks.

This year’s report, which Mr. Gates discussed in an interview with The New York Times, was unrelentingly grim. Not since 1870 have so many countries been in recession at once, it says.

Between 1990 and 2020, the percentage of the world’s population living in extreme poverty, which is now defined as living on less than $2 a day, shrank to less than 7 percent from 37 percent. In just the past few months, 37 million people have fallen back below the line, the report estimated.

One of the starkest conclusions in the report is that nearly twice as many deaths could be prevented if Covid-19 vaccines were distributed to all countries based on their populations rather than to the

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5 bathroom updates that will never go out of style

If you’re going to update a bathroom and you want your design choices to stand up over time, the first step is determining what styles will be timeless for you specifically.

“People tend to fall into one or two camps,” says interior designer Michael Winn of Winn Design and Build in Northern Virginia. “They want a very classic-looking bathroom, or they want something contemporary and spalike, like the Four Seasons.” Translation: For many people, the bathroom might not be the place to get splashy with trends.

But what if you adore bold colors and patterns? “Sometimes, the most timeless things are the things that you love,” says Katy Harbin, a designer based in North Carolina. “There are people that redo their bathroom every 10 years,” and for them, choosing a paint color of the year and of-the-moment hardware might work.

For those who want to do it right and be done, though, Winn, Harbin and Boston-based interior designer Erin Gates, author of “Elements of Family Style,” agreed on five bathroom updates that are truly timeless.

An all-white palette

Whether you prefer a classic-looking bathroom or a spalike retreat, Winn says, “white doesn’t go out of style.” Think white paint, tile, countertops, vanities and textiles.

If you find yourself craving color, you can add it with window treatments and towels, Gates suggests, or wallpaper and art. “Just be wary of installing wallpaper in an often-used bathroom with a shower, as the steam can sometimes cause the paper to peel.”

Harbin likes white towels with a contrast trim “in a perky color.”

Choosing the right paint color can be tricky, Harbin says, so it’s important to order larger color samples from paint stores rather than relying on paint cards. “You can have an earthy bathroom, like a really pretty travertine, . . . and if you put a stark white with it, it falls flat, but rich creams” will work, she says. If you can’t find larger samples, get a sample pot and paint a poster board to see how everything looks under your bathroom’s lighting. Put the paint next to tile and countertop samples to be certain they all work together.

Mixed metals

Blending two types of metals in the space can stand up better than going with one trendy finish throughout the room. In terms of particular metals, “polished nickel is timeless,” Winn says. Gates, too, prefers polished nickel; in her bathroom, she pairs it with a gold mirror.

When using two different metals (and no more than two), Harbin says to “repeat them enough and it will look good.” Try using gold on knobs and a mirror and nickel on faucets and hardware, and perhaps your lighting, for example.

Investing in higher-quality metal hardware will also help with longevity. A faucet with brass fittings and water-efficient technology “may be pricier in the beginning, but you’ll be grateful later,” Harbin says.

Marble countertops

“Marble, or a faux marble, like quartz with a marble appearance, will never go out of style,”

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