The 2021 Acura MDX’s Luxed-Up Interior Teased Before the Full Unveil

Despite the fact that its exterior design likely leaked earlier this year, we recently got our first teaser for the upcoming Acura MDX Prototype. It looks longer, leaner, and sharper than ever before. Now we’re being treated to a look at the MDX Prototype’s new interior, and the striking new design is clearly a shot at the big luxury brands.



a close up of a car: 2022 Acura MDX Interior 3


© Manufacturer
2022 Acura MDX Interior 3

The most obvious changes are the brand new driver’s area, the addition of a fully digital driver’s display that the brand is calling the Acura Precision Cockpit, and a brand new central tunnel that contains a drive mode selector much like the one found in the NSX supercar. Another massive screen sits atop the dashboard, revealing a reworked infotainment system that’s more elegant than before.

Other photos reveal the new look to the seats. There’s now more detailing in the way of contrasting stitching and piping, as well as intricate quilting. It also looks like there are tiny holes for seat ventilation, too. The leather with the contrasting piping continues into the second (and perhaps even the third) row of the new MDX.

Lastly there’s a look at a brand new, 25-speaker ELS Studio 3D audio system. It features LED lights behind the speaker grilles, similar to the high-end systems from Mercedes-Benz and BMW. All in all, it looks like the MDX is going seriously upmarket, signaling Acura’s ambition to double down on both luxury and performance. The new MDX Prototype will be fully unveiled on October 14th, so stay tuned for everything you need to know about the next big SUV from Acura.

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House Democrats to unveil bill to create commission on ‘presidential capacity’

Trump responded to Pelosi’s initial comments on Thursday by tweeting that “Crazy Nancy is the one who should be under observation. They don’t call her Crazy for nothing!”

Pelosi has repeatedly questioned Trump’s mental health and suggested that he needs an “intervention” from family members and White House advisers.

Pelosi suggested again on Thursday that the medications that Trump is taking for COVID-19 are causing mental impairment and erratic behavior.

Two days ago, Trump tweeted that he had instructed his aides to stop negotiating with Pelosi on a pandemic aid package. But then hours later, Trump called on Congress to pass piecemeal measures like aid for the airline industry, an additional round of stimulus checks and additional funding for the Paycheck Protection Program to help small businesses.

When asked during a Bloomberg TV interview on Thursday if she believed Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinOn The Money: Trump gambles with new stimulus strategy | Trump cannot block grand jury subpoena for his tax returns, court rules | Long-term jobless figures rise, underscoring economic pain Trump works from Oval Office six days after COVID-19 diagnosis Trump gambles with new stimulus strategy MORE had the authority to negotiate a coronavirus relief package on Trump’s behalf, Pelosi said, “The president is, shall we say, in an altered state right now.”

“There are those who say when you are on steroids and, or if you have COVID-19 or both, that there may be some impairment of judgment. But, again, that is for the doctors and the scientists to determine,” Pelosi added.

Trump was hospitalized at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center from Friday to Monday and received numerous therapeutics to treat COVID-19. He was also, at times, placed on supplemental oxygen.

Trump has released numerous videos recently stating that he is feeling better. He said Thursday morning in an interview on Fox Business that “I feel perfect. There’s nothing wrong.”

At least 34 White House staffers and other contacts have been infected with COVID-19 in recent days, including several who attended a White House ceremony announcing Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett, on Sept. 26.

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House Democrats unveil new $2.2T proposal for virus aid

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WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats unveiled a scaled-back $2.2 trillion aid measure Monday in an attempt to boost long-stalled talks on COVID-19 relief, though there was no sign of progress in continuing negotiations between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

The latest Democratic measure would revive a $600-per-week pandemic jobless benefit and send a second round of $1,200 direct payments to most individuals. It would scale back an aid package to state and local governments to a still-huge $436 billion, send a whopping $225 billion to colleges and universities, and deliver another round of subsidies to businesses under the Paycheck Protection Program.


The proposal represents a cutback from a $3.4 billion bill that passed the House in May, but remains well above what Senate Republicans are willing to accept. Republicans have endorsed staying in the $650 billion to $1 trillion range.



Pelosi said Monday that she remains in contact with Mnuchin, with whom she negotiated several earlier relief packages. The two spoke briefly on Sunday and Monday evening and are slated to talk again Tuesday morning, according to Pelosi spokesperson Drew Hammill.


“We’ve come down $1 trillion, and they need to come up because we have to crush this virus,” Pelosi said Monday on MSNBC. “It takes money to crush the virus. It takes money to make the schools safe. It takes money to put money in people’s pockets.”

Talks over the summer broke down in acrimony and name-calling, and conversations this month haven’t produced visible progress. Even if the rival sides could agree on a “top line” figure from which to negotiate details, dozens of difficult issues would remain to be sorted out.


For instance, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., is insisting that a liability shield against potential lawsuits brought against businesses, schools and universities that reopen during the pandemic be part of the legislation. Pelosi opposes the idea and didn’t include it in Monday’s legislation.

Democrats say the purpose of the new draft legislation is to show good faith and spark a more meaningful round of talks. But it also comes after party moderates and “front line” lawmakers in swing districts protested that Democratic leaders were being too inflexible.


Pelosi’s office has said she’s considering putting the new measure up for a floor vote

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House Democrats Unveil New $2.2T Proposal for Virus Aid | Business News

By ANDREW TAYLOR, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats unveiled a scaled-back $2.2 trillion aid measure Monday in an attempt to boost long-stalled talks on COVID-19 relief, though there was no sign of progress in continuing negotiations between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

The latest Democratic measure would revive a $600-per-week pandemic jobless benefit and send a second round of $1,200 direct payments to most individuals. It would scale back an aid package to state and local governments to a still-huge $436 billion, send a whopping $225 billion to colleges and universities, and deliver another round of subsidies to businesses under the Paycheck Protection Program.

The proposal represents a cutback from a $3.4 billion bill that passed the House in May, but remains well above what Senate Republicans are willing to accept. Republicans have endorsed staying in the $650 billion to $1 trillion range.

Pelosi said Monday that she remains in contact with Mnuchin, with whom she negotiated several earlier relief packages. The two spoke briefly on Sunday and Monday evening and are slated to talk again Tuesday morning, according to Pelosi spokesperson Drew Hammill.

“We’ve come down $1 trillion, and they need to come up because we have to crush this virus,” Pelosi said Monday on MSNBC. “It takes money to crush the virus. It takes money to make the schools safe. It takes money to put money in people’s pockets.”

Talks over the summer broke down in acrimony and name-calling, and conversations this month haven’t produced visible progress. Even if the rival sides could agree on a “top line” figure from which to negotiate details, dozens of difficult issues would remain to be sorted out.

For instance, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., is insisting that a liability shield against potential lawsuits brought against businesses, schools and universities that reopen during the pandemic be part of the legislation. Pelosi opposes the idea and didn’t include it in Monday’s legislation.

Democrats say the purpose of the new draft legislation is to show good faith and spark a more meaningful round of talks. But it also comes after party moderates and “front line” lawmakers in swing districts protested that Democratic leaders were being too inflexible.

Pelosi’s office has said she’s considering putting the new measure up for a floor vote if talks this week with the Trump administration prove fruitless.

“Democrats are making good on our promise to compromise with this updated bill, which is necessary to address the immediate health and economic crisis facing America’s working families right now,” Pelosi said in a letter to her colleagues. “We have been able to make critical additions and reduce the cost of the bill by shortening the time covered for now.”

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Hyundai Motor partners LG to unveil interior concept for future vehicles

SEOUL, Sept. 24 (Yonhap) — Hyundai Motor Co. and LG Electronics Inc. on Thursday unveiled an interior concept for future vehicles as the two South Korean firms join hands to showcase enhanced in-car experiences.

The IONIQ Concept Cabin is designed to show that future Hyundai vehicles can be a mobility solution that reflects people’s lifestyles by integrating the large interior space and vast power supply capacity of electric vehicles (EVs) with home electronics technologies, according to the companies.



This photo provided by Hyundai Motor Co. shows the IONIQ Concept Cabin, an interior concept for future vehicles, which the automaker developed in collaboration with LG Electronics Inc. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)


© Provided by Yonhap News
This photo provided by Hyundai Motor Co. shows the IONIQ Concept Cabin, an interior concept for future vehicles, which the automaker developed in collaboration with LG Electronics Inc. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

The interior concept is equipped with various car electronics products, such as clothing and shoe care devices, as well as a capsule coffee machine.

The concept cabin also features the ceiling-mounted 77-inch flexible OLED screen from LG. Users can adjust the curvature of the display that also supports a split screen, allowing two people to enjoy different content simultaneously.

The concept cabin also has UV LED light for sanitization and a bar-type floor cleaning robot.

Hyundai, South Korea’s top automaker, said it plans to offer such value-added experiences starting with its IONIQ 5 EV slated for launch early next year.

LG, a major home appliance manufacturer, has been trying to expand its presence in the mobility sector in recent years with its in-vehicle infotainment solutions. The company showcased its connected car platform at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.



a coffee cup sitting on a table: This photo provided by LG Electronics Inc. shows a capsule coffee machine installed in the IONIQ Concept Cabin, an interior concept for future vehicles, which the electronics firm introduced in collaboration with South Korea's top automaker Hyundai Motor Co. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)


© Provided by Yonhap News
This photo provided by LG Electronics Inc. shows a capsule coffee machine installed in the IONIQ Concept Cabin, an interior concept for future vehicles, which the electronics firm introduced in collaboration with South Korea’s top automaker Hyundai Motor Co. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

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House Democrats unveil reform package to ‘prevent future presidential abuses’

House Democrats on Tuesday unveiled a sweeping reform package to impose new checks on presidential power and potential wrongdoing in the executive branch, while toughening enforcement of ethics rules and congressional subpoenas — proposals they believe are necessary to “prevent future presidential abuses” and “restore checks and balances” to government after nearly four years of battles with President Trump and the White House.



Nancy Pelosi wearing a blue shirt: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol, Sept. 23, 2020.


© Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol, Sept. 23, 2020.

Drafted by party leaders at the direction of Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., the 158-page proposal would add new reporting requirements to the president’s use of the pardon power, and amend federal bribery law to include offering or granting of a pardon or commutation.

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(MORE: President Trump commutes sentence of longtime friend, adviser Roger Stone) (MORE: Trump’s impeachment trial: How we got here, what happens next and what to watch)

Democrats liken the package to the series of post-Watergate reforms passed in the wake of President Richard Nixon’s resignation – which included changes to campaign finance regulations, added oversight to the intelligence community and transparency to government with the Freedom of Information Act.

“The rule of law applies to every person in this country, including the president and members of the administration,” House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., said Tuesday at a news conference with House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., and other senior Democrats to roll out the package.

“We owe it to the American people to put meaningful constraints on power, fix what is broken, and ensure that there is never again another Richard Nixon or Donald Trump from either party,” Schiff said. “Even in a dangerous world, the threat to our democracy from outside the country is less than the threat from within.”

The package would suspend the statute of limitations for any federal crime committed by a sitting president or vice president – before or during terms in office – while making it more difficult for a president to profit off of the presidency, codifying the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution and beefing up enforcement of any violations.

It would add new insulation between the Justice Department and White House to prevent political interference in law enforcement matters. It would require the attorney general to maintain a log of contacts between the White House and DOJ, and mandate reporting to the DOJ inspector general.



Donald Trump standing in front of a crowd: President Donald Trump charges up the crowd while speaking of the need to win the upcoming election during a campaign rally at the Toledo Express Airport on Sept. 21, 2020 in Swanton, Ohio.


© Matthew Hatcher/Getty Images
President Donald Trump charges up the crowd while speaking of the need to win the upcoming election during a campaign rally at the Toledo Express Airport on Sept. 21, 2020 in Swanton, Ohio.

After struggling for years with the Trump administration’s resistance to congressional oversight, House Democrats would add teeth to their subpoenas — setting up an expedited process for the House and Senate to enforce subpoenas in civil court and greater penalties for noncompliance. Their proposal would also toughen

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Pelosi, Democrats unveil bills to rein in alleged White House abuses of power

Leading House Democrats on Wednesday unveiled sweeping legislation empowering Congress with more muscular oversight and anti-corruption tools to rein in alleged presidential abuses — present and future.

Behind Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi: Trump hurrying to fill SCOTUS seat so he can repeal ObamaCare House lawmakers reach deal to avert shutdown Centrist Democrats ‘strongly considering’ discharge petition on GOP PPP bill MORE (D-Calif.), the Democrats are hoping to bolster the congressional checks on the executive branch, as outlined by the Constitution, including efforts to curb abuses of presidential pardons; prevent presidents from profiting personally from the office; and secure administrative compliance with congressional subpoenas.

The legislation has no chance of becoming law while Republicans control the Senate and President TrumpDonald John TrumpOmar fires back at Trump over rally remarks: ‘This is my country’ Pelosi: Trump hurrying to fill SCOTUS seat so he can repeal ObamaCare Trump mocks Biden appearance, mask use ahead of first debate MORE remains in the White House. But it highlights the laundry list of abuse allegations Democrats have lodged against the president over the last four years — and provides Democrats with political ammunition as Congress prepares to leave Washington for the final sprint to the Nov. 3 elections.

“During this once-in-a-generation moment, the Congress has a sacred obligation for the people to defend the rule of law and restore accountability and basic ethics to the government. And that is exactly what we’re doing [with this package],” Pelosi told reporters in the Capitol.

“It is sad that the president’s actions have made this legislation necessary,” she added. “As with other things, he gives us no choice.”

Crafted by some of the Democrats’ top committee heads, the legislative package takes aim at the some of the most controversial episodes of Trump’s tenure.

One proposal would codify the Constitution’s emoluments clause, which bars presidents and other federal officials from accepting foreign gifts. Another would expedite the judicial process surrounding congressional subpoenas, which the administration has frequently disregarded leading to lengthy court proceedings.

“Congressional subpoenas are not requests that recipients can easily brush aside,” said Rep. Richard NealRichard Edmund NealRep. Bill Pascrell named chair of House oversight panel Rep. Cedric Richmond set to join House Ways and Means Committee Coons beats back progressive Senate primary challenger in Delaware MORE (D-Mass.), head of the Ways and Means Committee. “They are indispensable as a tool that this body uses to investigate potential wrong-doing … and to prevent future abuses.”

The legislation would also lend new teeth to the Hatch Act — which bars federal officials from promoting political interests during their normal course of duties — by establishing fines of up to $50,000 for violations.

Another provision would strengthen Congress’s powers to dictate federal funding by applying penalties to executive officials who misappropriate taxpayer dollars for pet projects. Democrats have long-accused Trump of abusing that power, including an incident when he tapped Pentagon funding to help build his wall at the Mexican border, and another when he withheld federal

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House Democrats unveil reforms to ‘prevent future presidential abuses’

Taken together, the proposals represent the Democrats’ long-awaited attempt to correct what they have identified as systematic deficiencies during the course of President Trump’s tenure and impeachment, in the style of changes Congress adopted after Richard Nixon left office.

Unlike the post-Watergate reforms, however, which took years to enact, today’s House Democrats have collected their proposed changes under one bill reflecting several measures that have been percolating piecemeal through the House.

“It is time for Congress to strengthen the bedrock of our democracy and ensure our laws are strong enough to withstand a lawless president,” the chairs of the seven House committees who curated the legislation said in a joint statement. “These reforms are necessary not only because of the abuses of this president, but because the foundation of our democracy is the rule of law and that foundation is deeply at risk.”

It’s unclear precisely when lawmakers would take up the legislation, though it will almost certainly be after November’s election or sometime in the new year.

The Protecting Our Democracy Act, as it is titled, is being rolled out almost a year to the day after Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) announced the House would pursue impeachment charges against the president. It faces long odds in the current Congress, where the Republican-led Senate is all but guaranteed to eschew the legislation.

Yet its release less than six weeks before Election Day signals the changes congressional Democrats envision pursuing under a possible Joe Biden presidency, or if the party seizes a majority of Senate seats in November.

The measure includes several provisions to speed up judicial rulings on congressional subpoenas and emoluments cases, in which the House or Senate alleges that a federal official violated constitutional prohibitions on accepting gifts without congressional permission. The bill states that both types of cases should be decided by a panel of three judges, and that any appeals would go directly to the Supreme Court.

The slow process of judicial review has been a frequent stumbling block for House Democrats attempting to subpoena Trump administration officials, leading the party to decide to avoid court battles entirely during Trump’s impeachment process, for fear of getting bogged down. A suit the House filed last summer to enforce a subpoena against Trump’s former White House counsel Donald McGahn is still working through the appeals process; last month, a federal appeals court panel in Washington, D.C. ruled 2-to-1 against the House, arguing that Congress hadn’t passed a law authorizing itself to sue to enforce subpoenas. The bill unveiled Wednesday expressly gives Congress that authority.

The package mirrors several measures to better regulate the relationship between the White House and Justice Department, which Democrats believe has been too cozy under the leadership of Trump and Attorney General William P. Barr. It reflects a proposal from Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) requiring the attorney general to keep a log of certain communications with the White House and periodically share it with the DOJ inspector general and Congress, and a bill from

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House Democrats unveil bill to avert a government shutdown at end of September

  • House Democrats unveiled a stopgap spending bill to keep the government open past Oct. 1.
  • It omits both farm aid — a Republican priority — but it also excludes food assistance for children during the pandemic, a measure Democrats sought.
  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he opposed the plan, raising the risks of a government shutdown.
  • The plan aims to keep the government funded until Dec. 11, when Congress would have to pass another spending bill.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

House Democrats unveiled their stopgap plan to keep the government funded past the end of September, omitting key priorities both parties sought.

The 104-page bill aims to maintain federal spending levels until Dec. 11, when Congress would have to pass another spending plan. It leave out nearly $30 billion in farm aid the White House wanted. But it also excludes pandemic food assistance for children, a Democratic concern.

But Senate Republicans came out against the plan shortly after it was unveiled, raising the risks of a government shutdown only nine days before federal funding is depleted — and barely a month before the presidential election. 

“House Democrats’ rough draft of a government funding bill shamefully leaves out key relief and support that American farmers need,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wrote in a tweet. “This is no time to add insult to injury and defund help for farmers and rural America.”

The bill is set to receive a vote this week in the Democratic-led House and then another in the GOP-controlled Senate, Both chambers must pass similar spending measures so President Trump signs it into law. Scores of federal agencies will start shutting down if Congress fails to reach an agreement by midnight on September 30.

Democrats slammed Republicans for opposing the spending bill.

“This GOP proposal isn’t about farmers — it’s about a political slush fund for the Trump re-election campaign,” Evan Hollander, the communications director for Democrats on the House Appropriations Committee, wrote in a tweet.

Read more: 3 top investing executives lay out the biggest risks to markets heading into a volatile election season — and share their best recommendations for navigating what happens next

The GOP is pushing to include the bailout program in the short-term funding measure, otherwise known as a continuing resolution.

“We do prefer additional farm aid in the CR. Most of all we want a clean CR, keep the government open,” White House National Economic Council director Larry Kudlow told reporters on Monday.

The Trump administration and Congress approved $19 billion in federal aid for farmers as part of the CARES Act earlier this year. That’s in addition to nearly $20 billion that the White House directed to farmers as a result of Trump’s trade wars over the past two years.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi agreed earlier this month to keep the coronavirus relief bill separate from discussions to avert a government shutdown.

Talks on a stimulus bill are still bogged down with

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House GOP slated to unveil agenda ahead of election

House Republicans are expected to unveil their agenda on Tuesday, which GOP lawmakers hope will help offer a contrast to policy proposals by House Democrats ahead of Election Day. 

The one-page blueprint has three planks:  “Restore Our Way of Life,” “Rebuild the Greatest Economy in History,” and “Renew the American Dream,” according to a “Dear Colleague” letter sent by Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyHow Trump’s false attacks on mail-in voting could backfire on him Hillicon Valley: Election officials prepare for new Russian interference battle | ‘Markeyverse’ of online fans helps take down a Kennedy | GOP senators unveil bill to update tech liability protections Google, Apple, eBay to meet virtually with lawmakers for tech group’s annual fly-in MORE (R-Calif.) to members of the GOP conference on Friday. 

“From day one, our goal was to present a unified Commitment to America offered by Republicans across the country, while pointing out the very real contrasts we have with our colleagues on the left. Since late July, we received over 150 policy submissions from you and your teams,” the letter stated.

“Working with our committees, caucuses, and the Trump Administration, we have distilled those submissions into a one-page framework that encapsulates our mission and plan moving forward.”

The plan’s objectives include finding a path forward on COVID-19, restoring the economy and updating the nation’s infrastructure. 

Republicans need to pick up at least 17 seats to regain the House majority they lost in 2018. A key component to their strategy is showing a contrast from Democrats’ plans, GOP members have said.

“We’ve been working to really address the issues that our country is facing right now, renewing, restoring and rebuilding this great nation and confronting the problems that are in front of us,” House Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseHouse panel details ‘serious’ concerns around Florida, Georgia, Texas, Wisconsin elections Scalise hit with ethics complaint over doctored Barkan video Ady Barkan says edited Scalise video has ‘ominous lessons’ for election MORE (R-La.) told The Hill following a conference meeting where members were briefed on the plan. 

 “It’s what this Congress should be working on unfortunately it’s not, but it’s what we’re passionate about and what we’re going to be battling for the next few weeks and months.”

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