White House staffers say they are relying on ‘Twitter and TV’ to tell them who has become infected

Several people who spent time with President Trump last week before he tested positive for COVID-19, including former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R), found out about his results through the news, The Wall Street Journal reports.

White House officials told the Journal a medical team is conducting contact tracing, working to notify individuals who were exposed to infected staffers. On Friday, Christie, who helped Trump prepare for last Tuesday’s debate against Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, said that he had yet to hear from anyone at the White House. Christie tweeted on Saturday that he had tested positive for COVID-19, and later shared that as a precaution, he checked into a New Jersey hospital.

Christie was at the White House on the morning of Sept. 26 for debate prep, and was in close proximity with multiple people who later tested positive for COVID-19, including Trump’s close adviser Hope Hicks, former White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien, and Trump himself. Later that day, Christie and Conway gathered in the Rose Garden for Trump’s announcement of Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his Supreme Court nominee. Not very many people wore masks to this event, and several guests have since tested positive, including Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah), who was spotted hugging and kissing other guests.

Other people who participated in debate practices with Trump, including his lawyer, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, and senior campaign adviser Jason Miller have said they tested negative for the virus. Giuliani said he learned about Hicks’ positive test results from the news, but White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows called to notify him of Trump’s diagnosis.

Several White House staffers told the Journal no one is doing a very good job internally of conveying information on test results or Trump’s condition, with one official saying they are “glued to Twitter and TV because I have no official communication from anyone in the West Wing.”

More stories from theweek.com
7 insanely funny cartoons about the chaotic first debate
Report: GOP Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania to retire in 2022
Doctor slams Trump for leaving hospital to drive by supporters: ‘The irresponsibility is astounding’

Source Article

Read more

Fox News Reporter Tells White House, Twitter to ‘Stop Blaming the Media’ for Again Asking if Trump Will Condemn White Supremacy

Fox News White House correspondent John Roberts sent a clear message to the White House and Twitter users on Thursday to “stop blaming the media” for asking again if President Donald Trump will publicly condemn white supremacy.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Screenshot of Fox News White House correspondent John Roberts on the network on October 1, 2020. "Stop deflecting. Stop blaming the media," he said. "I'm tired of it." Roberts pushed White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany to declare that President Donald Trump denounces white supremacy at a press briefing earlier in the day.


© Fox News
Screenshot of Fox News White House correspondent John Roberts on the network on October 1, 2020. “Stop deflecting. Stop blaming the media,” he said. “I’m tired of it.” Roberts pushed White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany to declare that President Donald Trump denounces white supremacy at a press briefing earlier in the day.

Earlier in the day, Roberts asked White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany if Trump denounces such groups.

“I would like to ask you for a definitive and declarative statement without ambiguity or deflection. As the person who speaks for the president, does the president denounce white supremacy and groups that espouse it in all their forms?” he asked during a press briefing.

McEnany replied, “This has been answered. Yesterday by the president himself. The day before by the president himself on the debate stage. The president was asked this. He said, ‘sure’ three times. Yesterday, he was asked point blank, ‘Do you denounce white supremacy,’ and he said ‘I have always denounced any form of that.'”

While McEnany read previous quotes that she said indicated that Trump “has condemned white supremacy more than any other president in modern history,” Roberts pushed for her to make an explicit, clear statement that Trump denounces these individuals. McEnany argued she “just did.”

“For all of you on Twitter, who are hammering me for asking that question, I don’t care because it’s a question that needs to be asked and clearly, the president’s Republican colleagues a mile away from here are looking for an answer for it too,” Roberts said on Fox News. “Stop deflecting. Stop blaming the media. I’m tired of it.”

Trump Struggles To Condemn White Supremacy During 2020 First Presidential Debate

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Trump’s response during Tuesday’s presidential debate has stirred confusion and controversy after the president was asked to condemn white supremacy on the national stage.

“Proud Boys—stand back and stand by. But I’ll tell you what, somebody’s got to do something about antifa and the left,” Trump replied.

His decision to not explicitly answer moderator Chris Wallace’s question has come under fire by a number of prominent Republicans.

Some GOP senators, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senator Lindsey Graham, have commented on the president’s remarks, calling on Trump to correct his statement while stating they personally denounce white supremacy.

When given the opportunity to do so, Trump said he did not know who the Proud Boys are.

“I don’t know who the Proud Boys are. You’ll have to give me a definition because I really don’t know who they are. I can only say they have to stand down and let law enforcement do their work,” he told reporters at the White House on Wednesday.

Roberts said the Trump’s additional

Read more

Hillicon Valley: Murky TikTok deal raises questions about China’s role | Twitter investigating automated image previews over apparent algorithmic bias

Welcome to Hillicon Valley, The Hill’s newsletter detailing all you need to know about the tech and cyber news from Capitol Hill to Silicon Valley. If you don’t already, be sure to sign up for our newsletter with this LINK.



a sign on the side of a building: Hillicon Valley: Murky TikTok deal raises questions about China's role | Twitter investigating automated image previews over apparent algorithmic bias | House approves bill making hacking federal voting systems a crime


© Getty Images
Hillicon Valley: Murky TikTok deal raises questions about China’s role | Twitter investigating automated image previews over apparent algorithmic bias | House approves bill making hacking federal voting systems a crime

Welcome! Follow our cyber reporter, Maggie Miller (@magmill95), and tech reporter, Chris Mills Rodrigo (@chrisismills), for more coverage.

TIKTOK TUSSLE: A deal to avert a U.S. ban on TikTok appears to have been reached over the weekend, but several questions remain about the contours of the pending agreement.

The most pressing is what role the short-form video app’s China-based parent company, ByteDance, will have in the newly formed entity TikTok Global.

President Trump suggested Monday that the deal could be in jeopardy if Oracle and Walmart – the two American companies involved in the proposal – do not have full control of the new TikTok.

“And if we find that they don’t have total control, then we’re not going to approve the deal,” he said during an appearance on “Fox & Friends.”

One of the next steps in the approval process includes a review by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS).

Without a term sheet being public, it is difficult to know the exact breakdown of the agreement, which was tentatively approved just before a Commerce Department order would have barred TikTok from appearing in U.S. app stores.

But from what is known, it appears that the deal falls far short of the full-on sale of TikTok to an American company that Trump originally called for in August.

Together, Oracle and Walmart will take only a 20 percent stake in the new company, TikTok said in a statement over the weekend.

According to ByteDance, other U.S.-based TikTok investors like Sequoia Capital and General Atlantic will stay on in the newly formed company, which has an estimated value of between $50 billion and $60 billion.

Even with the financial stakes of four U.S. companies, it is difficult to envision a scenario where ByteDance entirely removes itself from involvement in such a successful video app.

In a statement Monday, ByteDance emphasized it will remain in control of the new TikTok business and, crucially, the recommendation algorithm that makes the platform so popular.

That position was directly contradicted by Oracle executive vice president Ken Glueck, who said Monday that “Americans will be the majority and ByteDance will have no ownership in TikTok Global.”

The discrepancy may be explained by ByteDance’s ownership of TikTok Ltd., a business incorporated in the Cayman Islands that currently owns TikTok’s American operations.

Read more here.

ALGORITHMIC BIAS TEST CASE: Twitter is investigating the algorithm it uses to crop pictures for its mobile platform after several users pointed out a tendency to zero in on white faces.

Controversy over

Read more