‘A place to get away’: Huge water feature coming to Tulsa Botanic Garden | News

The water garden’s name comes from John and Mary Ann Bumgarner of the Bumgarner Family Charitable Foundation, which made the “major gift” to make the project possible.

At Wednesday’s announcement, John Bumgarner said he is excited to see the garden develop further and thrilled to forever be a part of it.

“This garden’s special to Tulsa,” Bumgarner said. “It’s growing, as most gardens do, and it’s expanding and it’s future is going to be very bright.

“It’s a good effort, a good project, and we’re most happy to support it.”

A spokeswoman for the Botanic Garden said that while the Bumgarners declined to announce the exact amount of their donation, the entire project cost is about $1.25 million.

To make the water garden, crews will raise the pool at the seven-acre lake’s north end 18 inches to create a waterfall at the southern end. Opposite this feature at the Sunrise Bridge, water will flow into the garden over natural rock with a view to the floating gardens on both sides of the pool.

Those floating gardens will include water-loving plants like iris and hibiscus while the lilies take up the standing water in between on the southern end. The walking path will take visitors past the overlooks on the pool’s eastern side, with each platform offering a closer view at the lilies and floating gardens below beneath the cypress trees’ shade.

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‘A place to get away’: Huge water feature coming to Tulsa Botanic Garden | Local News

The water garden’s name comes from John and Mary Ann Bumgarner of the Bumgarner Family Charitable Foundation, which made the “major gift” to make the project possible.

At Wednesday’s announcement, John Bumgarner said he is excited to see the garden develop further and thrilled to forever be a part of it.

“This garden’s special to Tulsa,” Bumgarner said. “It’s growing, as most gardens do, and it’s expanding and it’s future is going to be very bright.

“It’s a good effort, a good project, and we’re most happy to support it.”

A spokeswoman for the Botanic Garden said that while the Bumgarners declined to announce the exact amount of their donation, the entire project cost is about $1.25 million.

To make the water garden, crews will raise the pool at the seven-acre lake’s north end 18 inches to create a waterfall at the southern end. Opposite this feature at the Sunrise Bridge, water will flow into the garden over natural rock with a view to the floating gardens on both sides of the pool.

Those floating gardens will include water-loving plants like iris and hibiscus while the lilies take up the standing water in between on the southern end. The walking path will take visitors past the overlooks on the pool’s eastern side, with each platform offering a closer view at the lilies and floating gardens below beneath the cypress trees’ shade.

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Tulsa Botanic Garden announces new water garden construction to begin in January | Local News

The water garden’s name comes from John and Mary Ann Bumgarner of the Bumgarner Family Charitable Foundation, which made the “major gift” to make the project possible.

At Wednesday’s announcement, John Bumgarner said he is excited to see the garden develop further and thrilled to forever be a part of it.

“This garden’s special to Tulsa,” Bumgarner said. “It’s growing, as most gardens do, and it’s expanding and it’s future is going to be very bright.

“It’s a good effort, a good project, and we’re most happy to support it.”

A spokeswoman for the Botanic Garden said that while the Bumgarners declined to announce the exact amount of their donation, the entire project cost is about $1.25 million.

To make the water garden, crews will raise the pool at the seven-acre lake’s north end 18” to create a waterfall at the southern end. Opposite this feature at the Sunrise Bridge, water will flow into the garden over natural rock with a view to the floating gardens on both sides of the pool.

Those floating gardens will include water-loving plants like iris and hibiscus while the lilies take up the standing water in between on the southern end. The walking path will take visitors past the overlooks on the pool’s eastern side, with each platform offering a closer view at the lilies and floating gardens below beneath the cypress trees’ shade.

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New Tulsa Community Garden Intended As Safe Place To Grow

Tuesday, September 22nd 2020, 5:40 pm

By: Sawyer Buccy

TULSA, Okla. –

The pastor of a Tulsa church hopes a community garden will be a safe place for people to learn to grow.

The garden that Wesley Chapel has adopted doesn’t look like much yet, but it’s just the beginning.

The boxes full of seeds haven’t sprouted just yet and the plants are just barely budding right now but one day, hopefully not too far in the future, this space will flourish.

“We have built over 700 square feet of space to have a community garden in a food desert,” said Life’s Food Corporation founder Angela Landrum.

This garden is on Wesley Chapel property in Tulsa. It is being built entirely from community partnerships and the generosity of organizations and non-profits like Life’s Food Corporation and The Rotary Club of Bixby.

“We wanted to create a space that would last for years and years and years,” said Angela. “It is sustainability and empowerment. It is reducing the food insecurity that is currently running rampant.”

Wesley Chapel is adopting the garden and some of the people who go to the church will take over, helping the plants thrive. The community is also welcome to join.  

“The morning service is 100-150 folks who are mostly homeless,” said Wesley Chapel Pastor Chris Beach. “Most of the people we work with are on food stamps.”

Volunteers said they are hoping people can learn how to grow their own gardens at home from the skills they learn here.

Beach said they hope the work that happens in this garden, becomes one small piece of a much bigger puzzle.

“Honestly the more we serve and the more we keep open, the more we keep helping people, the more we keep empowering people to lead themselves, more keep coming in,” said Beach

The garden is in need of more plants and seeds. If you would like to help, you can drop them off at the church, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Monday through Friday.

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