manual garden tools to trim, snip, lop, saw, hoe, dig and rake through autumn and winter

There are some manual garden tools you just can’t live without, like this varied tranche of horticultural essentials.



best garden tools 2020: Burgon & Ball leaf rake


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best garden tools 2020: Burgon & Ball leaf rake

During the course of spring and summer we’ll be adding new products to this ever-expanding list of our favourite garden management tools, from secateurs, loppers, snippers and branch saws to spades, trowels, rakes, edgers, weeders and a variety of excellent hand tools.

To make this extraordinarily comprehensive guide easier to digest, we’ve sorted all the products on the page into four main categories: Pruning Tools, Digging Tools, Ground Care Tools and Hand Tools.

Although admittedly quite boring, these are all essential garden accoutrements that you need to know about because – oh yeah, baby – that’s how we get down

No matter how thorny the garden task, and no matter how weedy you are, these are the garden tools to get the job done.

Help, the product I want is out of stock

As you may discover, some of our favourite gardening products not surprisingly keep selling out. Hence, if you find a product we’ve reviewed that isn’t available via the provided retail link, then try these retailers who usually stock some very good alternatives.

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In the UK:

Amazon

B&Q

Waitrose Garden

Thompson Morgan

Crocus

Van Meuwen

Suttons

Dobies

Harrod Horticultural

Tooled UP

 In the US:

Walmart

Sears

Home Depot

Lowe’s

BEST PRUNING & CUTTING TOOLS

Before we start, we should address at least one particular piece of garden jargon that applies to both loppers and secateurs: bypass and anvil. 

Bypass secateurs and loppers have blades that are designed to pass each other smoothly as they cut, like scissors. They are perfect for green wood and delicate stems, as they give precise, clean cuts and avoid damaging or bruising the branch. 

Anvil loppers and secateurs, on the other hand, have one sharpened blade that cuts down on a flat hard plastic or rubber block, rather like a small chopping board. Anvil-equipped pruners are great for dead wood and dry, hard, old growth that needs cutting back. Mind, most amateur gardeners will happily make do with either mechanism since they both essentially perform much the same task. 

Now you know your bypass from your anvil, read on for the lowdown on the best quality manual snippers and cutters currently on the market.

Although they’re heavier, a little larger and more expensive than the majority of secateurs, this premium model screams quality all the way from the high-grade aluminium body and ultra-sharp TruEdge bypass blades to the tactile, ergonomically designed cork-covered handle.

The Quantum’s weighty feel and larger size makes them more suitable for gardeners with bigger hands but you’ll never rue the day you stumped up the readies to buy a pair. The cork handles provide maximum grip – especially when your hands are a bit sweaty – and they work really well with gloves, too. The blade slices through green stalks and stems

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House Democrats Poised to Trim Big Tech’s Sails

WASHINGTON—Democratic lawmakers are expected to call on Congress to blunt the power of big technology companies, possibly through forced separation of online platforms, as a House panel concludes its Big Tech probe.

The House Antitrust Subcommittee is nearing completion of a report wrapping up its 15-month investigation of

Alphabet Inc.’s

Google,

Apple Inc.,

Amazon.com Inc.,

and Facebook Inc. The report follows the committee’s collection of more than one million documents from the companies and competitors, as well as a July hearing with CEOs of the four tech giants.

Rep. David Cicilline (D., R.I.), who chairs the subcommittee, has indicated the panel is poised to recommend significant measures targeting Big Tech’s power, including requiring owners of huge technology platforms to separate those platforms from other businesses.

Mr. Cicilline hasn’t released details, but such a law could potentially ban Amazon from competing with sellers on Amazon.com, or Google from offering services that consumers look for on its search engine.

“You can’t set all the rules, control the marketplace and also sell on it, in the way that Amazon does, for example,” Mr. Cicilline said in a recent podcast for the Brookings Institution think tank.

The committee’s final report could include the platform-separation idea among a series of policy options, Mr. Cicilline has said. Others include boosting the budgets of U.S. antitrust enforcement agencies, amending U.S. antitrust laws with an eye toward making them less permissive and mandating “interoperability” so that consumers and businesses can more easily move from one tech platform to another.

Republicans say the inquiry left them concerned about the companies’ power in digital markets, but differ on how to address the problem.

“I don’t think there’s any doubt that both sides think there is a problem,” said Rep. Kelly Armstrong (R., N.D.), a member of the committee. But broad measures requiring Big Tech to separate lines of business could affect other industries that also operate online, an issue Congress would have to study, he said.

The CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google faced tough questions and, at times, hostile criticism about their business practices during a House antitrust hearing. The session highlighted how four of America’s five most valuable companies are under scrutiny from both sides of the aisle. Photo: U.S. House Judiciary Committee/Reuters

“We would be better served by attacking very narrow problem sets and seeing if we could come up with a solution,” he said, pointing to bipartisan concern about Amazon’s treatment of third-party sellers on its marketplace, among other issues.

Republicans also say existing antitrust laws are sufficient to bring enforcement actions against large tech companies.

Any proposal to separate big tech platforms’ businesses would face stiff opposition from the industry. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, at the committee hearing July 29, said he doesn’t believe it is a conflict of interest for Amazon to sell products on the e-marketplace it controls.

“The consumer is the one ultimately making the decisions. They’re making the decisions about what to buy, what price to buy it at, who

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