Erie County Tribute Garden honors domestic violence victims, survivors

On Saturday a celebration of the Tribute Garden’s fifth anniversary will be held. A poem will be unveiled on the stone steps of the berm.

TONAWANDA, N.Y. — Erie County’s Tribute Garden in Isle View Park is believed to be the first of its kind on public land. II’s designed to raise awareness around domestic violence while honoring victims and survivors.

Karen King of the Erie County Status of Women Commission there garden is “also a space where you can gather information through our kiosk and information about resources that are available in our community, if you or someone you know is in an abusive relationship and needs help.”  

According to the the National Coalition against Domestic Violence “domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive behavior as part of a systematic pattern of power and control perpetrated by one intimate partner against another. It includes physical violence, sexual violence, psychological violence, and emotional abuse.”

On Saturday a celebration of the Tribute Garden’s fifth anniversary will be held. A poem will be unveiled on the stone steps of the berm.

It’s a true community project from beginning to end.

Cornell cooperative extension master gardeners offer service learning opportunities for for middle and high school  students.

“We believe it’s been instrumental in exposing the problem and also teaching young people what they can do if they know someone who is impacted by domestic violence and the resources that are available. it also helps d to support a program called teen relationship violence awareness program,” King said.

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Kamala Harris visits Supreme Court to pay tribute to ‘titan’ Ruth Bader Ginsburg; calls on Dems to win Senate and White House

Kamala Harris stopped by the U.S. Supreme Court Saturday to pay tribute to “titan” Ruth Bader Ginsburg — and show she’s ready to fight for the iconic liberal justice’s legacy.



a group of people walking down the street: Democratic vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris (L) and her husband, Douglas Emhoff, stop in front of a memorial outside the US Supreme Court as the US mourns the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on September 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. Ginsburg died September 18, opening a crucial vacancy on the high court expected to set off a pitched political battle at the peak of the presidential campaign.


© Brian Stukes
Democratic vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris (L) and her husband, Douglas Emhoff, stop in front of a memorial outside the US Supreme Court as the US mourns the passing of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on September 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. Ginsburg died September 18, opening a crucial vacancy on the high court expected to set off a pitched political battle at the peak of the presidential campaign.

The Democratic vice presidential candidate joined throngs of mourners outside the court building in Washington D.C. as she quickly moved to shape the looming, titanic partisan battle over replacing Ginsburg.

“The stakes of this election couldn’t be higher,” Harris tweeted after offering prayers for Ginsburg and her grieving family. “Millions of Americans are counting on us to win and protect the Supreme Court—for their health, for their families, and for their rights.”

With early voting underway in five states and Election Day just over six weeks away, Democrats and Republicans were largely unified late Friday in praising Ginsburg as a leading legal thinker and advocate for women’s rights. But strategists in both parties also seized on the moment to find an advantage.

According to the Associated Press, multiple Republicans close to the White House believe that Trump will likely nominate a woman, who could serve as a counterweight of sorts to Biden’s choice of running mate Kamala Harris, who would be the first woman to serve as vice president.

Trump himself did not immediately comment on replacing Ginsburg.

Republicans hold a 53-47 edge in the Senate and Vice President Mike Pence could cast a tie-breaking vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. But several GOP senators have expressed various degrees of uneasiness with the idea of jamming a replacement through so close to a presidential election.

“We cannot let them win this fight,” said Harris in a statement to supporters on Saturday. “Millions of Americans are counting on us to stand up, right now, and fight like hell to protect the Supreme Court — not just for today, but for generations to come.“

“The work of holding Senate Republicans accountable to the standard they set in 2016 starts now. To Joe and me, it is clear: The voters should pick a President, and that President should select a successor to Justice Ginsburg.”

With News Wire Services

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EastEnders star Natalie Cassidy shares moving garden tribute to late mum, who died when she was 19

EASTENDERS star Natalie Cassidy has shared a moving tribute she has in her garden for her late mum, who died when she was 19.

The 37-year-old star was left devastated when her mother Evelyn lost her battle with bowel cancer in 2002 at the age of 63.

Natalie opened up about her late mum in a moving post

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Natalie opened up about her late mum in a moving post Credit: Getty Images

Taking to her Instagram page early this morning, the actress revealed that her brother had bought her a touching gift to remember their mum by for her 30th birthday.

The photo showed stunning flowers and green leaves growing over a block with Evelyn’s name written on it.

Natalie explained in the post’s caption: “This is our Evelyn Rose.

“My brother bought it for me for my 30th birthday. It’s 7 and a bit years old and has never looked better. My dad loves it and cares for it.

She shared a photo of the tribute she has to Evelyn in her garden

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She shared a photo of the tribute she has to Evelyn in her gardenCredit: Instagram
She was just 19 years old when her mum passed away

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She was just 19 years old when her mum passed away Credit: PA:Press Association

“I lost my mum when I was 19 – her name was Evelyn.”

She added how much she appreciated having something close by to remember her mum as her busy schedule sometimes stops her from getting to the cemetery.

The star wrote: “It’s nice to have something in your own space as well as a cemetery. Life is busy and you feel guilty for not going up there.”

Natalie previously admitted that she broke down over an EastEnders’ storyline about her onscreen mum Carol Jackson fighting cancer.

She admitted to struggling with the 'rawness' of onscreen mum Carol's cancer storyline

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She admitted to struggling with the ‘rawness’ of onscreen mum Carol’s cancer storylineCredit: BBC
EastEnders’ Natalie Cassidy reveals co-star Steve McFadden refused to talk to her after she quit the soap

She plays Carol’s daughter Sonia in the BBC One soap, and the heartbreaking scenes brought back difficult memories for the star.

Natalie said at the time: “It’s all quite raw, there have been tears.”

She confessed that she “lost herself” after her mother’s death, but she didn’t seek help from a bereavement counsellor until she was hit by a second wave of grief when her “second mum” Wendy Richard, who played Pauline Fowler, died in 2009.

Natalie explained: “I hit rock bottom. I had to see someone about my mum, mistakes and regrets.”

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Tribute to hope: Atlantic Canada’s first garden for cancer survivors almost finished

The finish line is in sight for a Nova Scotia couple who have spent the last two and a half years working to create Atlantic Canada’s first garden for cancer survivors.

Judie and Jim Edgar are both cancer survivors.

Judie was diagnosed with breast cancer twice, in 2003 and in 2013, and Jim was diagnosed with liver cancer in 2017. Both have recovered.

Judie said the Daffodil Garden for Cancer Survivors is meant to show people that a cancer diagnosis isn’t necessarily a death sentence.

“When you hear the word ‘cancer’, you think of people who didn’t survive,” she said. “You read it in newspapers, you hear from family and friends. Even the park benches have plaques.

“But there’s so many survivors out there like Jim and I who are surviving and thriving that we just thought it would be a very wonderful message.”

The entry points to the ribbon-shaped paths will have names. (Alex Cooke/CBC)

Jim said the term “survivor” also extends to the friends and family of people who have had cancer.

“They were there to comfort, to talk to, to go to treatments with them. They’re survivors in their own right as well,” he said.

“Although they haven’t experienced cancer firsthand, they’ve experienced it secondhand from the person they’ve been doing the journey with.”

Judie said doctors and health-care workers are included as well, because they’ve worked with people who have both survived and didn’t survive cancer. “It’s got to be tough on them,” she said.

She said she was inspired by similar gardens in Ontario while she was living in Mississauga during her first round with breast cancer.

‘Everybody has their own story’

The garden is in downtown Dartmouth, along the harbour walk near the Alderney ferry terminal, and offers a scenic view of the Halifax harbour.

Judie said she didn’t want it to be near a hospital or treatment centre, since survivors and people with cancer already spend a lot of time at hospitals.

The concrete path winding through the garden is in the shape of a cancer awareness ribbon. At the centre of the ribbon stands a statue depicting a boy, a middle-aged woman and an elderly man, showing that cancer doesn’t discriminate. 

The people in the statue, sculpted by artist Ivan Higgins of Concrete Creations, are from different generations to show that cancer doesn’t discriminate. (Alex Cooke/CBC)

The three figures are all connected in some way: the woman at the centre has her arms around the other two, and the old man and the boy are holding hands.

“One of the things that we’ve found in this journey is that cancer’s become such a connector,” Jim said, explaining why the figures are connected. 

“Everybody has their own story, either personal, or a family member, or whatever.”

The project was supported by all three levels of government, and funding came in the form of a grant from the provincial department of Communities, Culture and Heritage, money from municipal district capital funds, and a grant

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