This Interior Designer Turned Her Cookie-Cutter Town House Into a Personal Art Gallery

“The biggest challenge was using what was already here but making it better,” says Tiffany (left). “This isn’t our forever home, so I had to be really smart about what I decided to spend money on and what just needed a small facelift. It’s way easier to bring your full vision to life without any restrictions, but the fun part is figuring it out with those limitations.”

“The biggest challenge was using what was already here but making it better,” says Tiffany (left). “This isn’t our forever home, so I had to be really smart about what I decided to spend money on and what just needed a small facelift. It’s way easier to bring your full vision to life without any restrictions, but the fun part is figuring it out with those limitations.”

When interior designer Tiffany Thompson bought this two-bedroom Portland, Oregon, town house in 2016, she was working at Nike and viewed its close proximity to the company’s headquarters as a major benefit. It also didn’t hurt that she had access to a community pool and tennis court, or that the drive toward her street was lined with towering trees. But the deciding factor, Tiffany remembers, is that it had a certain Pacific Northwest luxury. “What initially drew me to this place was the amount of natural light it received. It’s pretty bright all of the time,” Tiffany says. “Coming from Miami where it’s usually sunny, the thing that scared me most about purchasing a home in Portland was that it was going to be dark and rainy seven months out of the year.”

The challenge would be turning this cookie-cutter town house into a personalized haven. Tiffany was surrounded by a blank canvas. Luckily, her boyfriend, Julian Gaines, is a fine artist. “With all of the art, we want to evoke emotion and really let them be the highlight of our home,” she says. “Being with an artist is amazing because I have endless items to choose from.”

“For the dining room art, Julian imagined himself being next in line on his way to heaven and seeing the person in front of him receiving his halo,” she says. The table is from Lillian August, and the surrounding chairs are from Design Within Reach. The Studio Eero Aarnio Mini Pony Chair in the corner was found at Finnish Design Shop.
“For the dining room art, Julian imagined himself being next in line on his way to heaven and seeing the person in front of him receiving his halo,” she says. The table is from Lillian August, and the surrounding chairs are from Design Within Reach. The Studio Eero Aarnio Mini Pony Chair in the corner was found at Finnish Design Shop.

Tiffany couldn’t touch the exterior or overhaul its interior, thanks to a homeowners’ association and a limited budget, but she could reimagine its white walls. She pictured a theme of timeless and cozy beauty, punctuated by details that were functional yet exciting upon a closer glance. Tiffany considered her canvas for a year, figuring that it was best to take her time on “making this home feel like me.” And when she was ready, she landed primarily on a black-and-white palette. “It’s amazing how these two colors bring a sense of balance to a space,” Tiffany says. “There’s also so much greenery outside that the black-and-white palette grounded my home and makes the backdrop of the outdoors feel and look even more intense.”

“These types of homes have exteriors that all look alike, so it was important for me to have some features that were our own and fun,” Tiffany says. The accent wall is made of one-and-three-fourths inch oak slats that were nailed to the wall in one-inch gaps. The entire project was painted in Tricorn Black by Sherwin-Williams. The coffee table and floor lamp are from CB2, and the chrome Wassily side chairs were found on Chairish. The framed artwork was created by Julian and the masks are vintage.
“These types of homes have exteriors that all look alike, so it was important for me to have some features that were our own and fun,” Tiffany says. The accent wall is made of one-and-three-fourths inch oak slats that were nailed to the wall in one-inch gaps. The entire project was
Read more

This Tiffany Thompson Turned Her Cookie-Cutter Town House Into a Personal Art Gallery

“The biggest challenge was using what was already here but making it better,” says Tiffany (left). “This isn’t our forever home, so I had to be really smart about what I decided to spend money on and what just needed a small facelift. It’s way easier to bring your full vision to life without any restrictions, but the fun part is figuring it out with those limitations.”

When interior designer Tiffany Thompson bought this two-bedroom Portland, Oregon, town house in 2016, she was working at Nike and viewed its close proximity to the company’s headquarters as a major benefit. It also didn’t hurt that she had access to a community pool and tennis court, or that the drive toward her street was lined with towering trees. But the deciding factor, Tiffany remembers, is that it had a certain Pacific Northwest luxury. “What initially drew me to this place was the amount of natural light it received. It’s pretty bright all of the time,” Tiffany says. “Coming from Miami where it’s usually sunny, the thing that scared me most about purchasing a home in Portland was that it was going to be dark and rainy seven months out of the year.”

The challenge would be turning this cookie-cutter town house into a personalized haven. Tiffany was surrounded by a blank canvas. Luckily, her boyfriend, Julian Gaines, is a fine artist. “With all of the art, we want to evoke emotion and really let them be the highlight of our home,” she says. “Being with an artist is amazing because I have endless items to choose from.”

“For the dining room art, Julian imagined himself being next in line on his way to heaven and seeing the person in front of him receiving his halo,” she says. The table is from Lillian August, and the surrounding chairs are from Design Within Reach. The Studio Eero Aarnio Mini Pony Chair in the corner was found at Finnish Design Shop.

Tiffany couldn’t touch the exterior or overhaul its interior, thanks to a homeowners’ association and a limited budget, but she could reimagine its white walls. She pictured a theme of timeless and cozy beauty, punctuated by details that were functional yet exciting upon a closer glance. Tiffany considered her canvas for a year, figuring that it was best to take her time on “making this home feel like me.” And when she was ready, she landed primarily on a black-and-white palette. “It’s amazing how these two colors bring a sense of balance to a space,” Tiffany says. “There’s also so much greenery outside that the black-and-white palette grounded my home and makes the backdrop of the outdoors feel and look even more intense.”

“These types of homes have exteriors that all look alike, so it was important for me to have some features that were our own and fun,” Tiffany says. The accent wall is made of one-and-three-fourths inch oak slats that were nailed to the wall in one-inch gaps. The entire project was

Read more

Popular West Palm eatery Kitchen set to open second location at Alton Town Center



a man and a woman standing in a room: Aliza Byrne and Chef Matthew Byrne own and operate Kitchen restaurant in West Palm Beach. [Photo by LILA PHOTO]


© [LILA PHOTO]
Aliza Byrne and Chef Matthew Byrne own and operate Kitchen restaurant in West Palm Beach. [Photo by LILA PHOTO]

PALM BEACH GARDENS — Seven years after opening their popular American brasserie Kitchen in West Palm Beach, Chef Matthew Byrne and his wife, Aliza, are preparing to debut the sequel. 

The West Palm Beach residents will unveil their second Kitchen restaurant early next month at Alton Town Center in Palm Beach Gardens.

The eatery, which will seat 150 with ample outdoor space and a private room, joins a growing list of new restaurants at the 360,203-square-foot retail complex on Donald Ross Road.

More: Gardens McDonald’s reopens dining room after $450,000 contemporary renovation

More: Miller’s Ale House to open next year at Alton Town Center in Gardens

The location was a perfect one for the Byrnes, who were eager to expand into an area where many of their regular customers live, including nearby Jupiter.

“It’s such an amazing community there,” said Aliza Byrne, who has grown familiar with the area since her teenage sons began attending The Benjamin School. “A lot of our clients live nearby. There was such a huge demand from people who said they wished we were closer. We feel really good about it.”

Byrne said she expects to draw more year-round diners to the new Alton Town Center location, whereas the original Kitchen, at 319 Belvedere Rd., is more seasonal.

That restaurant, which has drawn a steady stream of locals and visiting VIPs since it first opened in October 2013, seated just 36 people initially and served only beer, wine and champagne for the first three years.

The Alton Town Center restaurant will have a ‘proper’ bar, Byrne said, which will allow for a bar menu and happy hour.

“We were never able to have a happy hour,” she said. “We’re really excited about that.”



a chicken sandwich and salad on a plate: Kitchen's chicken schnitzel is one of Chef Matthew Byrne's favorites.


© [Contributed by LibbyVision.com]
Kitchen’s chicken schnitzel is one of Chef Matthew Byrne’s favorites.

The restaurant also will have valet parking, an outdoor patio, and private event space that can accommodate up to 20 people.

The menu will feature most of the same, modernized comfort classics created by chef Byrne — a former personal chef for golf great Tiger Woods — that are found at the original Kitchen, such as fettuccine bolognese, seared strip steak and chicken schnitzel.

“Our philosophy is to keep it simple, buy the freshest and do as little as possible,” Aliza Byrne said. “With everything from a foie gras burger to a grilled fish, to somebody who has celiac (disease) or is a vegetarian or a vegan, we want everyone to enjoy. There’s something for everybody.”

Kitchen will open for dinner initially, but plans are to add a Saturday and Sunday brunch.

Byrne said she is excited to finally open the Kitchen doors after months of planning and a four-month delay brought on by the novel coronavirus pandemic.

“It’s been so fun to create a space from scratch,” she said. “With our space in West Palm,

Read more

A Garden Center’s Worth of Trees and Bushes Has Transformed the Street Outside Old Town Brewing Into a Green Escape

In most instances when you run up against one of those white- and safety-orange-striped “Road Closed” barricades, heavy equipment is on the other side ripping into the pavement, frustrating drivers now in need of another route along with neighbors who must put up with the sustained din of construction.

At Old Town Brewing’s Northeast Portland location, these blockades actually seal off a tranquil urban thicket right in the middle of the street.

This past summer saw every bar, brewery and restaurant in town expand into lanes of traffic if they had the means and ability. While many of these makeshift pandemic patios are nothing much to look at, Old Town’s is different: It immerses you in nature.

“I think one of the things that made such a drastic improvement were all of the trees,” says owner Adam Milne. “It made Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard look like a park. It’s beautiful.”

The temporary woodland—just off the major thoroughfare on Northeast Sumner Street—took more to create than just a run to the closest big-box store’s garden department. The trees are actually loaners from the city of Portland’s Bureau of Environmental Services as part of its effort to partner with the Portland Bureau of Transportation’s Healthy Business program. And the agency didn’t just pick whatever extra available shrubs happened to be in storage, either—careful planning went into the selection of each flower and frond for Old Town and the newly launched Dream Street Plaza it’s a part of.

“They sent out an arborist who walked through the place to develop a ‘tree site plan’ to help support the goals of the plaza,” says PBOT spokesperson Hannah Schafer.

The plaza, which had its grand opening Oct. 2, is the result of a $25,000 National Association of City Transportation Officials grant that PBOT won to aid with pandemic response and recovery. Through Nov. 1, 15 vendors will be posted along Sumner. Spearheaded by the Soul District Business Association, Old Town’s side-street picnic table seating was also born of that group’s suggestion.

Right now, there’s no better place than the little forest sprouting from cement to enjoy a pizza and a Pillowfist, Old Town’s take on a New England IPA that is appropriately soft in mouthfeel and cloudy in appearance. While the temperature still allows, the oversized garage door at the front entrance will be rolled up, providing more airflow for anyone dining indoors.

But you owe it to yourself to find some solace among the trees—some squat and bushy, others taller than the red umbrellas shading the patch with blooming flowers in a complementary shade of crimson.

When not looking up at the flora, you’ll notice the landscaping and shaping extends to the ground. On one half of the road is a mural that looks like a postmodern game of hopscotch; the brightly colored squares and rectangles were designed by the owner of the neighboring boutique. Then, next to the curb is a wide strip of green artificial lawn, a purchase inspired by an

Read more

Speaker Pelosi, House Democrats leave town, fail the American people

Wheels up, off to California after adjourning the House until after Election Day. It’s a shameful display of partisanship in the wake of our recovery from the coronavirus. Rather than help small businesses continue to access unused funds from the Paycheck Protection Program, Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiGOP lawmaker calls on Pelosi to apologize for response to Trump contracting coronavirus Pelosi: ‘We’re making progress’ on coronavirus relief bill What President Trump’s positive COVID test could mean for the markets MORE (D-Calif.) is willing to block reasonable relief efforts, all in the name of politics. She doesn’t want to risk President TrumpDonald John TrumpQuestions remain unanswered as White House casts upbeat outlook on Trump’s COVID-19 fight White House staffers get email saying to stay home if they experience coronavirus symptoms White House says ‘appropriate precautions’ were taken for Trump’s outing to see supporters MORE and congressional Republicans getting an ounce of credit in the final weeks of this election.

Some things are simply more important than political posturing, like ensuring American small businesses can weather the storm of the coronavirus pandemic. We have unspent funds from the Paycheck Protection Program, a COVID relief program that saved 51 million jobs in the United States, 2 million in Ohio alone. Its authorization is expiring, meaning the program is closing up shop, despite $138 billion left in the coffers. My Ohio colleague, Rep Steve ChabotSteven (Steve) Joseph ChabotKate Schroder in Ohio among Democratic challengers squelching GOP hopes for the House Centrist Democrats ‘strongly considering’ discharge petition on GOP PPP bill Lawmakers call for expanded AI role in education, business to remain competitive MORE, has a simple, straightforward bill that reauthorizes the unspent funds through the end of the year, expands the eligible entities and expenses, and further protects the program so that businesses with fewer than 300 employees can get to the front of the line.

We are on the right path toward economic recovery, with more than 10 million jobs created or brought back after the worst of the pandemic. But as states re-open at different paces, we still have businesses struggling to adjust and keep their doors open. Mom and pop stores, those with just a handful of employees are bearing the brunt of the economic damage. That’s why this PPP extension bill earmarks $25 billion for businesses with 10 or fewer employees and, if a business receives a second PPP loan, this bill ensures the total of those two loans cannot exceed $10 million.

Those businesses with just a few employees can make up a large number of loans in the program, but those loans will often be some of the smallest approved by the Small Business Administration. They are businesses that would struggle with the compliance and paperwork costs associated with byzantine processes mandated by federal regulators. This bill eliminates this problem: a simple form attesting that the business complied with the loan requirements is all that will be needed. It also requires them to keep records

Read more

House near graveyard in UK won’t sell, so town adds in bonus burial plot

Well, at least the neighbors will be quiet.

Realtors are reportedly struggling to sell a reasonably priced lodge in the United Kingdom due to its proximity to the local cemetery. So now, town officials have thrown in an added bonus for potential home buyers: a free grave.

The house is located next to the local cemetery and local officials are reportedly hoping to use the profits from the sale to fund repairs to the graveyard.

The house is located next to the local cemetery and local officials are reportedly hoping to use the profits from the sale to fund repairs to the graveyard.
(iStock)

The three-bedroom lodge is owned by the local council in the town of Malton, The Sun reports. The house is located next to the cemetery, and local officials are reportedly hoping to use the profits from the sale to fund repairs to the graveyard.

In order to sweeten the deal for the house, local officials have decided to throw in a free plot at the cemetery to go along with the house, the news outlet reported.

5 THINGS TO KNOW BEFORE BUYING A TINY HOME

Malton Mayor Paul Emberley explained: “An opportunity arose earlier this year to sell the property when our tenant decided to move to another part of the town. Members subsequently made a decision to sell the asset as part of a wider investment program.”

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

Aside from the free grave, the property also boasts a courtyard and an enclosed garden. It’s located on a gated avenue, too.

Money from the sale will reportedly be used to pay for improvements to the graveyard’s two chapels, along with the restoration of the cemetery gates and the widening of the access roads.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

While bonus gravesite are important, there are several other things potential home buyers should also consider. Family Handyman previously reported that prospective buyers often forget to consider storage, cell phone signal and noise into their buying decisions.

Source Article

Read more

After canceling two events, Old Prairie Town prepares for its new Garden Glow event – Entertainment – The Topeka Capital-Journal

For the past several months, Ward-Meade Garden at Old Prairie Town has been quiet as guests have meandered through the garden, taking in the green foliage and blooming flowers.

But what has been missing are the twinkling lights and large luminaries that many associate with Tulips at Twilight and the Tulip Festival — two annual events that were canceled this year because of COVID-19.

Park officials also canceled the annual Apple Festival, which draws a large crowd of people each year eager to watch demonstrations and eat apples.

“Apple Festival is the biggest event that we have here, and we see on a good year between 6,000 and 8,000 visitors throughout the park at that time,” Old Prairie Town recreation program supervisor John Bell said. “We hated to cancel the 41st annual Apple Festival. It is a fall tradition in many people’s schedules and it’s something that they come out here year after year with their friends and family.”

As a way to make up for those losses, Ward-Meade officials have created a new event that will allow for guests to once again experience an illuminating garden with less interaction and more social distancing in mind.

Garden Glow, which takes place from 7-10 p.m. Oct. 2-11, will feature luminaries, lighted displays and seasonal plants.

Admission is $5, and guests are strongly encouraged to abide by Shawnee County’s face mask requirement.

Because of restrictions on mass gatherings, Ward-Meade has limited the number of people allowed inside at any given time to 400, Bell said.

“We will have volunteers at the gate counting, and then once we get to that 400 number, it will be a one in, one out restriction,” Bell said. “In the garden area, the paths are a little smaller and things can get congested, so we are going to have a directional path flow so that everybody will hopefully enter one path and exit another path.”

Garden Glow will feature several large displays similar to what visitors see during Tulips at Twilight.

“This year we had new displays we were unable to put out because of COVID, so nobody has seen a lot of those,” Bell said. “So this will be an opportunity to not only see some of the past favorites but we have some new displays as well.”

Some of the new displays will include butterflies, ladybugs and frogs.

Those visiting during Garden Glow will also be able to see the hundreds of annuals and trees in bloom.

“It’s different in fall because everything is blooming,” Bell said. “In April, it’s pretty much just the tulips.”

Given COVID-19 restrictions, Garden Glow will be the only large event that Old Prairie Town hosts this year, Bell said.

“The community has seen so many big events get canceled due to COVID,” Bell said. “We wanted to give the community something because at this point, I think the citizens need something to see and experience. We’ve had so many subtractions regarding activities and events. We wanted to give them

Read more

Kandy Garden Club helps to promote sports in the town

The Kandy Garden Club which counts over 100 years of existence was established in 1878. It was started by the British especially for planters to play tennis over the weekends. It continued to be so till about 1945, when a special class of Ceylonese were permitted to join the Club.By 1950, it was open to the Ceylonese and the first President was Col.S.D.Ratwatte, who was elected in 1950 while Chandra.Wijenayake was elected as the Secretary. The original Club House built in 1878 is still intact, with a few renovations.

The Club now provides several facilities to members,which include Tennis, billiards ,Snooker, Table Tennis and card games like Bridge. In Billiards too they have promoted the game by inviting the World Billiard Champions, Paul Mifsud, Norman Dagley,Michael Ferreira,M.J.M.Lafir and others to play exhibition matches at the Club table. In 1989 they staged the second Snooker test between Sri Lanka and Pakistan at the Club. .Traditionally over the years, they have awarded distinguished personalities honorary membership in the Club as it has a well equipped Bar and a Restaurant.

There are four well maintained Tennis Courts for adult and Student Members and a special feature is that flood lit tennis is available for those who wish to play tennis in the night . The Club also conducts Tennis coaching camps for beginners and organizes Tennis tournaments for children of International and National Schools in the Central province. They organise ranking tennis tournaments and have produced several national level players in the recent past. Over the years Kandy Garden Club has maintained a very high standard in both Billiards and Snooker and World class players like M.J.M.Lafir and Leslie Driffield were seen in action at these tournaments.Facilities are also provided to school children to play Table Tennis at the Club.Another popular game the members engage in is Bridge, a card game ,Bridge tournaments are conducted at the club for over 50 years.

Source Article

Read more

Bay Area political events: Peter Strzok, House members town hall

TUESDAY

Racism’s physical, psychological effects: Diversity and inclusion expert Mary-Frances Winters discusses her new book, “Black Fatigue, How Racism Erodes Mind, Body and Spirit.” Hosted by the Commonwealth Club. 9 a.m. More information is here.

Peter Strzok: Former FBI agent and author of “Compromised: Counterintelligence and the Threat of Donald J. Trump,” in a conversation hosted by the Commonwealth Club. 12:30 p.m. More information is here.

Reps. Barbara Lee, Mark DeSaulnier, Jackie Speier: Bay Area Democrats host a town hall meeting on racial justice in America. 6 p.m. Join meeting here.

WEDNESDAY

Worker cooperatives: A roundtable event to discuss how worker cooperatives can provide a viable alternative for people approaching retirement. Panelists include Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Fremont; Democratic Assemblyman Ash Kalra; Santa Clara Mayor Lisa Gillmor; Zen Trenholm of the Democracy at Work Institute; Hilary Abell of Project Equity; and Kirk Vartan, worker owner at ASONY. Noon. More information is here.

Sen. Sherrod Brown: Ohio Democrat in conversation on progressive power in the Senate. Hosted by the Commonwealth Club. 3:30 p.m. More information is here.

THURSDAY

Libby Schaaf, Kevin Faulconer: Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf and San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer discuss fiscal realities for local governments during the coronavirus pandemic. Hosted by the Public Policy Institute of California. 11 a.m. More information is here.

“Suppressed 2020”: A screening of “Suppressed 2020: The Fight to Vote,” followed by a talk with voting rights advocate Valerie Morishige. Hosted by the Piedmont Diversity Film Series. 4:30 p.m. More information is here.

S.F. D1 candidates: Candidates for District One supervisor take part in a forum hosted by the League of Women Voters. 7 p.m. Register here.

FRIDAY

Conservation history: An exploration of conservation history of the 19th and early 20th centuries, and how it fits into the larger context of American history of injustices toward indigenous communities and people of color. Hosted by the Peninsula Open Space Trust. Noon. More information is here.

SEPT. 22

Rep. Ro Khanna: Fremont Democrat holds a town hall meeting. Noon. Submit question in advance here; join meeting here.

SEPT. 23

S.F. D7 candidates: Candidates for District Seven supervisor take part in a forum hosted by the League of Women Voters. 7 p.m. Register here.

Art and abolishing the police: Pendarvis Harshaw interviews art curator Ashara Ekundayo about an upcoming show and auction, “Imagine Freedom: Art Works for Abolition,” and the role art plays in the movement to dismantle the policing and prison systems in the U.S. Hosted by KQED. 8 p.m. More information is here.

SEPT. 24

H.R. McMaster: President Trump’s former national security adviser in a discussion hosted by the Commonwealth Club. Noon. More information is here.

SEPT. 28

Election meetup: A Zoom meetup for supporting green candidates and issues in the November elections. Hosted by GreenChange.net. 6 p.m. More information is here.

SEPT. 29

Juan Felipe Herrera, Naomi Shihab Nye: Former U.S. poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera, author of the new book “Every Day We Get More Illegal,” and poet, songwriter and novelist Naomi

Read more

Inside a Light-Filled Town House in New York’s Historic Greenwich Village

From the street, this elegant 19th-century brick house looks like many of its neighbors in New York’s historic Greenwich Village. But when you open the front door, you realize that the soaring, light-filled space you’ve entered is very much of the present. That was precisely what the house’s owners sought when they hired New York architect Lee Skolnick and the San Francisco–based AD100 designer Steven Volpe to transform what had been a traditional interior into something much more modern.

<div class="caption"> A table and chairs from <a href="https://munder-skiles.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Munder Skiles" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Munder Skiles</a> sit on the garden terrace. </div> <cite class="credit">Thomas Loof</cite>
Thomas Loof

The owners told both Skolnick and Volpe that they wanted “an urban oasis, a place of quiet and repose.” Moreover, they, like Skolnick (whose monograph Skolnick Architecture + Design Partnership: Public/Private will be published next month), wanted the house to open to views of neighboring gardens, a particularly pleasant feature of the area. Having designed houses for both artists and collectors, the architect responded with a design that he calls “a vertical loft” and “a light machine.” 

<div class="caption"> The rear garden features limestone retaining walls and flooring. Table and chairs by <a href="https://munder-skiles.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Munder Skiles" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Munder Skiles</a>. </div> <cite class="credit">Thomas Loof</cite>
The rear garden features limestone retaining walls and flooring. Table and chairs by Munder Skiles.

Thomas Loof

<div class="caption"> A pair of chaise longues by <a href="https://www.knoll.com/shop/by-designer/richard-schultz" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Richard Schultz" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Richard Schultz</a> for <a href="https://www.knoll.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Knoll" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Knoll</a> on the penthouse terrace. </div> <cite class="credit">Thomas Loof</cite>
Thomas Loof

Skolnick, whose team included Paul Alter, a partner in the firm, and Joern Truemper, the project architect, likens the individual floors—two of which end in mezzanines—to “trays” that are surrounded by light, which comes down from the top of the stairway of the five-story house to the first floor. The all-glass rear façade also illuminates the lower level, with its open kitchen and formal dining area looking directly into a tree-lined courtyard.

<div class="caption"> In the main bedroom, a <a href="https://www.hollandandsherry.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Holland & Sherry" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Holland & Sherry</a> fabric covers the upholstered bed. Custom cover of a <a href="https://www.scalamandre.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Scalamandré" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Scalamandré</a> wool and silk damask; bench by Bruno Romeda; cyanotype by <a href="http://meghannriepenhoff.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Meghann Riepenhoff" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Meghann Riepenhoff</a>. </div> <cite class="credit">Thomas Loof</cite>
Thomas Loof

Volpe is known for sophisticated interiors that mix cutting-edge 20th-century and antique pieces with understated chic. Fittingly, he and Ralph Dennis, his firm’s design director, orchestrated a deft blend of furnishings by icons like Jean-Michel Frank, Eyre de Lanux, and Madeleine Castaing, pieces by noted contemporary designers like Pierre Charpin, Martin Szekely, and Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, and custom upholstery and cabinetry. Responding to the owners’ wish for “open spaces, lots of light, and an emphasis on tones of white and sumptuous textures,” Volpe explains, “We tried to create rooms that are modern, but not cold.”

<div class="caption"> In the dining room of the Greenwich Village town house, a custom light fixture by <a href="http://www.bouroullec.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec</a> hangs above a table designed by <a href="https://www.stevenvolpe.com/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Studio Volpe" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Studio Volpe</a> and vintage chairs by Tobia and Afra Scarpa. </div> <cite class="credit">Thomas Loof </cite>
In the dining room of the Greenwich Village town house, a custom light fixture by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec hangs above a table designed by Studio Volpe and vintage chairs by Tobia and Afra Scarpa.

Thomas Loof

The two-story living room is the house’s centerpiece; extending from front to back, it ends in a mezzanine that overlooks the kitchen-dining area and out to the rear garden. In this space, with its oak floors and walls of white hand-­troweled plaster, Volpe and Dennis used pale, neutral, and luxurious fabrics, some of them custom-made by the Brooklyn-based weaver Tara Chapas. Since the front door opens directly into the space, it is partly obscured by a screen, of Murano glass and metal, which Volpe commissioned from the artist Ritsue Mishima. On the wall opposite the screen, a mirror by Line Vautrin hangs above a marble console by Charpin. A corner of the room with

Read more