Fashion designer dies, Cleveland Browns attendance upped, White House cases, more – coronavirus timeline Oct. 3-9

CLEVELAND, Ohio – Here is our regular roundup of coronavirus facts, figures and numbers regarding Cleveland, Ohio, the United States and the world Oct. 3-9:

Oct. 3: CNN says only three states – Texas, Missouri and South Carolina – are reporting a decline in new cases compared to last week, as the country hit its highest daily rate in almost two months. Twenty-one states report an increase in cases. Chris Christie, former New Jersey governor and aide to President Trump, announces he tested positive. He joins several other prominent figures who tested positive, including Kellyanne Conway and Ronna McDaniel, chairwoman of the Republican National Committee. CBS News reports that the California governor’s office, in a Tweet, suggests restaurant-goers keep their masks on “in between bites.”

Oct. 4: Trump leaves the hospital and takes a ride with Secret Service members, drawing criticism for leaving a quarantined and controlled health environment. The Ohio Investigative Unit cites Barley House in Cleveland for violations regarding sales for on-premises alcoholic consumption. Club Paradis in Cleveland receives an administrative citation for improper conduct and limitation on hours for on-premises consumption. Kenzo Takada, founder of the French luxury fashion house Kenzo, dies of coronavirus. He was 81.

Oct. 5: After seeing high infection rates, officials in Paris say bars will be shut down again today. The Ohio health department allows the Cleveland Browns to double spectators to 12,000 at FirstEnergy Stadium. For the first two home games, the Browns received an exemption on the coronavirus gathering limit and were allowed 6,000 fans in the stadium. Ohio reports 1,057 new coronavirus cases, with the total approaching 160,000. Deaths are at 4,931. Cleveland has 36 new cases. So far, 1 in 73 Ohioans are known to have contracted Covid. Dr. Mike Ryan, director of the World Health Organization’s Health Emergencies Program, says about 10% of the world’s population has had the virus. That translates to about 760 million people. President Trump, upon his release from the hospital, says: “Don’t let it (coronavirus) dominate you.” White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany (photo above, bottom right) says she has tested positive.

Oct. 6: Trump policy adviser Stephen Miller announces he has tested positive. Dr. Anthony Fauci says if health precautions are not followed, the United States could hit 400,000 deaths by winter. Kent State University will ask 450 random students to be tested weekly and partner with CVS. Kent campus reported 40 new cases for the week of Sept. 27.

Oct. 7: Half the U.S. states are reporting increases in Covid cases. Iranian state television reports 239 fatalities, a record number of daily deaths for the country of more than 80 million people. Ohio has 1,424 new virus cases. In all, 162,723 people have had coronavirus. The number of deaths increase 23 to 4,970. Cleveland’s Department of Public Health says it has not identified any more coronavirus infections while conducting contact tracing on 11 positive cases linked to the presidential debate in Cleveland. None of the 11 people who tested positive

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Timeline: How the White House coronavirus outbreak unfolded

  • On September 26, President Donald Trump hosted an event at the White House Rose Garden to honor his nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.
  • In the days since, the president and a number of people close to him have tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.
  • Trump left Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, on Monday evening, where he had been hospitalized since Friday.
  • Here’s a timeline of the White House coronavirus outbreak, which involves a number of people who include two GOP senators, the first lady, several close advisers, and the White House press secretary.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump early Friday announced he and First Lady Melania Trump tested positive for COVID-19, and hours later he was admitted to the Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, where he was treated with at least three different therapeutic drugs. 

Trump’s diagnosis came shortly after that of his adviser and former communications director Hope Hicks and not long before two GOP senators and others close to him announced they, too, had tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

Here’s how the apparent COVID-19 outbreak at the White House began, from a possible superspreader event on September 26 to Trump’s release from the hospital on Monday evening. 

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The White House has been unclear on timeline leading up to Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis. Here’s more details on his travels in the past week.

President Donald Trump announced early Friday that he and first lady, Melania Trump, tested positive for COVID-19.

The world reacts after President Trump and first lady Melania test positive for COVID-19

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Since then, the White House has sent mixed signals about his condition and the timeline of events leading up to his diagnosis and transfer to the hospital.

White House physician and Navy Cmdr. Sean Conley said Sunday that President Donald Trump continues to improve in his battle against COVID-19 and could be discharged.

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“There are frequent ups and downs … particularly when a patient is being so closely watched 24 hours a day,” said Conley. “If he continues to look and feel as well as he does today our hope is that we can plan for a discharge as early as tomorrow to the White House, where he can continue his treatment course.”



Donald Trump in a suit standing in front of a crowd: President Donald Trump throws hats to supporters after speaking at a campaign rally at Duluth International Airport in Duluth, Minn. on Sept. 30, 2020.


© Alex Brandon, AP
President Donald Trump throws hats to supporters after speaking at a campaign rally at Duluth International Airport in Duluth, Minn. on Sept. 30, 2020.

Meanwhile, aides sought to portray an image of business as usual despite lingering uncertainty over the severity of his case.

After an update on Trump’s health at a news conference Saturday, an administration official – later identified by the Associated Press and the New York Times as chief of staff Mark Meadows – met with reporters and described the president’s condition earlier in the week as “very concerning.”

Events are still unclear, but some details were compiled by USA TODAY after examining reports by the White House pool of reporters, as well as Trump’s recent schedules.

Friday, Sept. 25 – week before diagnosis

11:11 a.m. EDT:  Trump attends Latinos for Trump roundtable 

First on the president’s schedule Friday was a Latinos for Trump roundtable in Doral, Florida. Trump arrived Thursday night after a rally in Jacksonville.

3:08 p.m. EDT: Trump speaks on Black Empowerment

Trump traveled to Atlanta, Georgia to speak at the Cobb Galleria Centre.  There, he spoke on Black empowerment and unveiled a new plan, dubbed the Black Economic Empowerment “Platinum Plan,” aimed at winning over Black voters ahead of the November election.



Brian P. Kemp wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: President Donald Trump greets Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and his wife Marty as he arrives at Dobbins Air Reserve Base for a campaign event at the Cobb Galleria Centre, Sept. 25, 2020, in Atlanta.


© Evan Vucci, AP
President Donald Trump greets Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp and his wife Marty as he arrives at Dobbins Air Reserve Base for a campaign event at the Cobb Galleria Centre, Sept. 25, 2020, in Atlanta.

4:26 p.m. EDT: Traveling back to Washington

6:29 p.m. EDT: Trump hosts fundraiser in Washington

Trump attended a fundraiser event at his hotel in Washington, D.C. Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel, who was at the function, has since reported her coronavirus-positive status.  

8:48 p.m. EDT: Trump hosts rally in Newport News, Virginia

Around 4,000 people gathered at the Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport Friday night for Trump’s “Make America Great Again” rally.



Donald Trump et al. around each other: NEWPORT NEWS, VA - SEPTEMBER 25: U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport on September 25, 2020 in Newport News, Virginia. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


© Drew Angerer, Getty Images
NEWPORT NEWS, VA – SEPTEMBER 25: U.S.

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Timeline of what officials said about Trump’s COVID-19 battle

WASHINGTON – Ever since President Donald Trump announced early Friday that he had tested positive for coronavirus, the White House has sent mixed signals about his condition and the timeline of events leading up to his transfer to the hospital.

Trump says he tested positive for coronavirus

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That confusion was amplified Saturday when Dr. Sean Conley, the White House physician, offered a rosy assessment of the president’s condition only to be contradicted later by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, who told Fox News that Trump’s condition before entering the hospital “concerned” aides and doctors. 

Conley then clarified his remarks when he told reporters that Trump was “72 hours” into his diagnosis, a timeline that would have meant the White House knew he was sick Wednesday. Conley later said he should have described Saturday as the “third day” of Trump’s fight – that is, late Thursday, into Friday and then Saturday.



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after testing positive for COVID-19.


© Drew Angerer, Getty Images
President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after testing positive for COVID-19.

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Here’s a look at the timeline of events since Trump announced his diagnosis:

Oct. 1, 10:44 p.m. ET: Trump tweets that longtime aide Hope Hicks has tested positive for coronavirus. Reporters quickly establish that Hicks took recent trips with Trump, including aboard Marine One. 

Trump says he will quarantine and says he’s awaiting test results. 

Oct. 2, 12:45 a.m. ET. Trump announces on Twitter that he has tested positive for coronavirus, a stunning development with the potential to upend his campaign and his administration’s messaging on its response to the virus. White House officials later say Trump had received the test about an hour before the announcement.  

Trump says first lady Melania Trump is also positive. 

More: Trump, Melania test positive for coronavirus, president vows to begin quarantine 

Trump is silent on whether he has symptoms, but White House physician Sean Conley says days later that Trump had developed a fever and congestion by Thursday night.

“We will begin our quarantine and recovery process immediately,” Trump tweeted. “We will get through this TOGETHER!”



Counselor to the President Hope Hicks walks from Marine One to accompany President Donald Trump aboard Air Force One as he departs Sept. 30, 2020, at Andrews Air Force Base, Md.


© Alex Brandon, AP
Counselor to the President Hope Hicks walks from Marine One to accompany President Donald Trump aboard Air Force One as he departs Sept. 30, 2020, at Andrews Air Force Base, Md.

Oct. 2, 1:11 a.m. Conley releases a memo confirming the positive test result and asserts that the president and first lady plan “to remain at home within the White House during their convalescence.” Trump istransferred to Walter Reed Medical Center later that day. The memo mentions

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White House official says Conley misrepresented timeline of Trump’s diagnosis

After Dr. Sean Conley created significant confusion on the timeline of President Donald Trump’s diagnosis, telling reporters Trump was “72 hours into the diagnosis now,” a White House official said Conley meant that Trump was on Day 3 of the illness.

The official said the diagnosis was made Thursday night, making Saturday the third day into his diagnosis.

The White House official also said Conley misspoke when he said Trump had been administered a Covid-19 treatment from Regeneron 48 hours ago. It was given to Trump later Thursday night, according to the official.

The timeline of Trump’s diagnosis is important.

Trump notified the public that he had tested positive just before 1 a.m. Eastern on Friday. He held campaign events on Wednesday and Thursday.

 

The questions Trump’s doctor evaded at the Walter Reed briefing

Dr. Sean Conley, President Donald Trump’s White House physician, dodged several key questions Saturday as he briefed a small group of reporters outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where the president is being treated.

  • Has he been on any supplemental oxygen? Conley was pressed several times to answer this question. He repeatedly said Trump was not receiving oxygen Saturday morning and eventually said, “Thursday, no oxygen, none at this moment, and yesterday with the team, while we were all here, he was not on oxygen.” Conley, however, would not say whether Trump previously received oxygen at the White House.
  • When was the president’s last negative test? Conley said he’s “not going to get into testing going back.”
  • Has the president had any lung damage? “We’re following all of that. We do daily ultrasounds. We do daily lab work. The team is tracking all of that,” said Conley, who, when pressed again to answer the question, said he wouldn’t get into their findings.
  • How was the president infected and when did it happen? Conley declined to answer these questions.
  • What was Trump’s fever when he had it? Conley said the president has been fever-free over the last 24 hours. He said Trump had a fever Thursday into Friday but he would “rather not give any specific numbers” when asked for Trump’s actual temperature when he had the fever.

McConnell announces the Senate will not return until Oct. 19, Barrett confirmation hearings to go on as planned

After news that three GOP senators tested positive for Covid-19, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced in a statement Saturday that the Senate will not come back into session until Oct. 19. 

“On Monday, I intend to obtain a consent agreement for the Senate to meet in pro forma sessions for the next two weeks. Previously-scheduled floor activity will be rescheduled until after October 19th,” McConnell said. 

The Senate had originally been scheduled to return to Washington next week.

The confirmation hearing process for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett will go on as planned,

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White House physician walks back a confusing timeline of Trump’s coronavirus infection that implied he was diagnosed days before announcing his test results



a man wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he "will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days" after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters


© Provided by Business Insider
President Donald Trump disembarks from the Marine One helicopter followed by White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows as he arrives at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after the White House announced that he “will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days” after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Joshua Roberts/Reuters

White House physician Sean Conley offered a new timeline for the president’s coronavirus infection during a press briefing Saturday morning. He later walked back the statement.

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Conley held the briefing to review President Donald Trump’s condition after he was hospitalized at Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday evening. The physician said Trump’s condition had improved, but he also said the president’s COVID-19 infection had been identified a day earlier than previously thought.

“Just 72 hours into the diagnosis now,” Conley said. “The first week of COVID, and in particular days 7 to 10, are the most critical in determining the likely course of this illness.”

That would mean that Trump had been diagnosed on Wednesday.

Dr. Brian Garibaldi, a physician on the team caring for the president at Walter Reed, also said that Trump had received an experimental antibody treatment “48 hours ago,” which would be roughly Thursday morning.

This was a different timeline than the one constructed by incremental statements from the White House. Trump announced his positive test results early Friday morning, and the White House disclosed his experimental antibody treatment later that day.

When asked to clarify, Conley contradicted his earlier statement.

“Thursday afternoon following the news of a close contact is when we repeated testing, and given kind of clinical indications had a little bit more concern. And that’s when late that night we got the PCR confirmation that he was [positive],” he said.

Shortly after the briefing, Conley released a statement retracting his initial timeline from the press briefing, saying he “incorrectly” said 72 hours instead of “day three” and 48 hours instead of “day two.” (Even though Garibaldi said “48 hours,” not Conley himself.)

“The President was first diagnosed with COVID-19 on the evening of Thursday, October 1st and had received Regeron’s antibody cocktail on Friday, October 2nd,” the statement said.

The company that makes the antibody treatment is called Regeneron.

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Doctor says Trump ‘doing very well’; White House tries to clear up president’s Covid timeline

President Donald Trump is “doing very well” after his first night at Walter Reed Medical Center where he is being treated for the coronavirus, White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said Saturday.



a group of people posing for a photo in front of a building


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The president has been fever free for 24 hours; is not currently receiving supplemental oxygen and has normal organ function, the doctors said, declining to predict when he might discharged. He will be on a five-day course of an experimental drug treatment, the doctors said.

The White House then tried to clear up confusion set off from the briefing over when Trump became ill.

Standing outside Walter Reed, the president’s doctors said he was “72 hours into the diagnosis,” even though Trump had only announced his positive coronavirus test late Thursday evening, after attending a fundraiser in New Jersey. His doctors also said had been treated “48 hours” ago — Thursday morning — with antibodies.

NBC News’ Dr. Torres explains treatment, next steps for Trump after Walter Reed update

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But a White House official later disputed the timeline, saying Trump had been diagnosed Thursday night and that the doctors meant Trump was on “day 3” not a full 72 hours in on his diagnosis.

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The official also said that the antibody treatment was given later Thursday night, not a full 48 hours ago.

Adding to the confusion, a White House aide, who refused to include their name, told members of the White House press pool that the president’s condition may been more serious than the physicians suggested. The pool is a small group of reporters who travel with the president on behalf of all the news outlets who cover the White House.

“The President’s vitals over last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care,” the aide said in a statement to the press pool that did not include NBC News. “We are still not on a clear path to a full recovery.”

It was unclear whether the aide or the president’s physician had more update information.

A source familiar with the President’s condition said some of the same to NBC News on Saturday: “Some the President’s vitals signs Friday morning were early indicators of the potential for progression beyond mild illness.”

The president is “doing very well” after his first night at Walter Reed Medical Center where he is being treated for the coronavirus, White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said Saturday morning in a briefing outside the hospital.

The doctors said Trump had a cough, nasal congestion, and fatigue on Thursday, symptoms that have since begun improving and resolving. They also suggested he received an antibody treatment on Thursday morning.

Video: Apparently rapid progression of Trump’s illness raises concerns among experts (MSNBC)

Apparently rapid progression of Trump’s illness raises concerns among experts

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Trump told his doctors, “I feel like I could walk out of here today,” the doctors said.

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