Trump comes back negative for coronavirus on antigen test, White House doc says

President Trump tested negative for the coronavirus on consecutive days, his doctor said Monday as the president flew to Florida for a rally.

Dr. Sean P. Conley said Mr. Trump tested negative using an Abbott BinaxNow antigen card, the type of test the administration is sending to nursing homes and governors across the country.

Dr. Conley said the tests, combined with lab data such as the president’s viral load and culture data, suggest the virus is not replicating in the president’s system.

“This comprehensive data, in concert with the CDC’s guidelines for removal of transmission-based precautions, have informed our medical team’s assessment that the president is not infectious to others,” Dr. Conley wrote.

The doctor on Saturday said he believed that Mr. Trump was no longer infectious after testing positive for the virus Oct. 1 and spending three days at the hospital.

The president lined up a busy campaign schedule, starting with Monday’s rally in Sanford, Florida, and events in Pennsylvania and Iowa over the next two days.

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Trump said no COVID-19 negative test, continues to obfuscate on health

  • President Donald Trump on Thursday dodged questions from Fox News about whether he has yet tested negative for COVID-19.
  • The obfuscation came despite Trump claiming he is now recovered from the illness, after testing positive last week.
  • He said he would “probably” be tested on Friday arguing that “there’s no reason to test all the time.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump implied that he has yet to test negative for COVID-19 since his diagnosis, despite boasting that he has recovered.

Speaking with Fox News anchor Sean Hannity on Thursday night, Trump dodged questions over whether he had been tested since he announced his positive test the week before, leading to a three-night stay in the hospital.

Hannity asked if Trump had tested positive since last week. Trump responded that he would likely be tested on Friday, and claimed that there’s no reason to be regularly tested.

He said “Well what we’re doing is probably the test will be tomorrow. The actual test, because there’s no reason to test all the time.”

trump walter reed

A car with US President Trump drives past supporters in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020.


ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images



He also avoided earlier questions on testing from Hannity:

When Hannity asked if he had been tested recently, Trump responded: “Yeah, I just saw the doctors today. They got me in great shape. I’m in great shape”

And when Hannity asked if he had tested negative, Trump did not answer and instead pointed to an experimental cocktail of antibodies he had been given. “I’ll tell you I took this Regeneron and it’s phenomenal,” he said.

White House Physician Sean Conley said in a memo on Thursday that he thinks Saturday is when Trump can make a “safe return to public engagements.”

Trump told Hannity that he hopes to do a rally in Florida on Saturday night, and one in Pennsylvania on Sunday.

Saturday will be 10 days after Trump was first diagnosed.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that COVID-19 patients wait 10 days after their symptoms first appear before being around others (as long as they have not had a fever in the preceding 24 hours.)

The White House has not disclosed details about Trump’s symptoms or when any first emerged.

Officials have instead obfuscated details of the president’s health.

The White House won’t say when Trump last tested negative before his positive diagnosis.

That means it is unclear who is at risk among the people that Trump saw in the busy week before he tested positive, or when Trump is likely to stop being infectious.

Donald Trump coronavirus

Trump on his way to Walter Reed Military Medical Center after he tested positive for COVID-19 on October 2, 2020.

SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images


As Business Insider’s Jake Lahut and Oma Seddiq reported, the last time Trump or anyone at the White House said on the record that the president tested negative

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Reboot Test Kitchen Returns with A New Interactive Animated Short

Seattle’s Reboot Test Kitchen is returning this October to workshop an interactive tale that will explore gender identity.

Seattle’s Reboot Test Kitchen is returning this October to workshop an interactive tale that will explore gender identity through the larger than life imagination of a child.

Writer Adam Kern is hopeful that his “_____form Prologue” will develop into an interactive animated short. The medium will be a natural fit as the piece features slice-of-life moments that often erupt into epic clashes of dragons and fantasy. The project is designed to showcase the internal weight and importance that identity can carry for the young protagonist.

The workshop highlights an inclusive and diverse cast of actors, featuring professional voice-over artist Julie Rei who also served as an invaluable consultant on the piece.

‘Trans representation in art is not only a personal mission of mine, but also aligns with the mission of Reboot Theatre Company,” says Jasmine Joshua, founder and Artistic Director of Reboot Theatre Company. “I chose Adam’s script because I wanted to encourage writers of all backgrounds to include trans narratives in their work and, as a trans writer, artist, and producer, I wanted to help him develop it and provide the dramaturgical support needed to make the piece as authentic and uplifting as possible.’

Kern says, “As a cis-gendered gay man, I’ve always realized that my understanding of the complexities these characters are going through are not to the level of those who have actually lived through them. Authentic feedback and assistance have always been one of our major priorities and the Test Kitchen will continue to be a natural extension of that goal.”

Kern, a professional actor who also co-owns and directs for an immersive theatre company in Cleveland, has produced 30-40 readings of other artists work, but states that he’s beyond thrilled to watch his words come to life as a first-time writer himself.

Producer Clint Sears adds that he was immediately on board for the idea the moment Kern pitched it. “Empathy starts with understanding and Adam is crafting something that’s not only entertaining but accessible for everyone. To find the balance in a work that has authentic representation and speaks to cultural awareness as well would be the ultimate success.”

The performance and workshop will be on Monday, October 12th, between 7:00-9:00 PM PT, and will include work from five other artists. More information available at https://www.reboottheatre.org.

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Pence’s negative COVID test could be “meaningless” for debate, doctor says

The vice presidential debate is set to get underway Wednesday evening with extra COVID-19 safety measures in place, but one doctor is questioning whether that will be enough as the virus outbreak at the White House continues to grow.



Mike Pence wearing a suit and tie: White House Coronavirus Task Force Speaks To The Media In Daily Briefing


© / Getty Images
White House Coronavirus Task Force Speaks To The Media In Daily Briefing

“More layers of protection are so important,” Dr. Neeta Ogden said Wednesday on CBSN. “It’s not just Pence, it’s the team that he’s traveling with, it’s the exposure on a daily basis.”

The vice president’s physician announced that Pence took a PCR coronavirus test Tuesday afternoon that came back negative. And the White House said Pence and his wife both tested negative again Wednesday in Salt Lake City, where the debate is being held. But as Ogden points out, test results only reflect a specific moment in time and don’t guarantee an infection won’t develop later. 

“Just because he’s had a daily antigen test, intermittent PCR tests, is meaningless if he continues to interact with other people on his team or anybody else in the world — we don’t know what their COVID status is,” she said. 

Since President Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis last week, a growing number of staffers within the White House, and several members of the press corps, have tested positive for the virus. Senior adviser to the president Stephen Miller, press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, three of her deputies and Trump 2020 campaign manager Bill Stepien are just some of those close to the executive branch that have tested positive. Stephen Miller’s wife, Katie Miller, who serves as Pence’s communications director, tested negative on Tuesday; she had coronavirus back in May, but she left Salt Lake City out of an abundance of caution.

Doctor on FDA’s COVID vaccine guidelines and VP debate safety

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“There are a lot more risk factors here than just Pence has had negative tests,” Ogden said.

After initial pushback from Pence’s team, extra precautions have been taken at the debate site to address those risk factors, including plexiglass barriers and 12 feet of separation between the candidates on stage.

Ogden called the Trump-Pence campaign’s resistance to such measures “ridiculous.” She said the plexiglass and the distance are just “two pieces” of a puzzle.

“We need to make sure there’s good ventilation in that auditorium — ideally this debate should have been over zoom or should’ve been outside,” she said. “I think there’s still definitely a risk here.” 

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Notre Dame student: Father Jenkins, Trump failed COVID-19 leadership test

  • An event held in the Rose Garden may have been responsible for infecting many high-profile politicians with coronavirus.
  • As a Notre Dame student, it was extremely disappointing to see our President, Father John Jenkins, at the event and not following the protocols that we students have been carefully following ourselves.
  • Rachel Palermo is a J.D. candidate at Notre Dame Law School.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Leaders must lead by example. 

Setting policies is an important part of being a leader. But the people who set the rules need to join the rest of us in following them.

As a law student at the University of Notre Dame, I have spent the last few months following important rules that have been imposed by our school.

Early this summer, the Notre Dame administration announced that we would return to in-person classes for the fall semester, even as many colleges and universities converted to fully remote learning. In exchange for being able to attend in-person classes, our community has been entrusted with meeting certain safety expectations.

To name a few: we wear masks at all times, stay six feet away from other people, and refrain from traveling outside of the area. We are often reminded that our responsibilities to one another don’t end once we leave campus.

I understand that the only way to keep our community safe is to take the COVID-19 rules and recommendations seriously, even when they are inconvenient. I’m proud that many other Notre Dame students have demonstrated responsible behavior — on and off campus — because they also understand the stakes are too high. 

Last week, along with many of my classmates, I watched the Rose Garden ceremony for the nomination of our professor, Judge Amy Coney Barrett, with disappointment and embarrassment. 

Setting aside whether or not we believe that nominating someone to the US Supreme Court a month before an election is appropriate, we sat in disbelief as some Notre Dame professors and administrators didn’t wear masks, ignored social distancing guidelines, and even shook hands with other attendees. They broke every rule and guideline that we have been told to follow. 

We watched a potential super-spreader event unfold before our eyes on live television, with familiar faces in the crowd. For those of us who have been social distancing since the spring, watching the ceremony was like observing an alternate reality. 

This week, we learned that Donald Trump, Melania Trump, and other high profile White House officials in attendance at the ceremony tested positive for COVID-19. Trump’s diagnoses came just 48 hours after mocking Joe Biden at the presidential debate for his habit of wearing masks. 

Sen. Mike Lee and former Gov. Chris Christie, who tested positive as well, were captured on video hugging other attendees in the Rose Garden. Our own University President, Father John Jenkins, was also present, flouting both mask and social distancing guidance. He has since announced

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Our Test Kitchen Found the Best Yellow Cake Mixes

When we think of a good cake, we always think homemade—like something Grandma would make. But in reality, we know that making a cake from scratch isn’t always practical. Seriously, who hasn’t forgotten to make cupcakes for that bake sale until the morning of? That’s why so many home cooks like to keep a backup plan in the cupboard: a box of cake mix. If you’re going to make a boxed mix, you want it to taste as homemade as possible.



a graffiti covered wall


© Claire Krieger/Taste of Home


That’s why our Test Kitchen put eight brands of yellow cake mix (a great standard mix) to the test to find the one that will make those last-minute bakes really shine.

What Makes a Great Cake Mix

Our Test Kitchen sampled all these cake mixes with the following standards in mind:

  • Flavor: A good yellow cake (from a box or not) should taste buttery and sweet—not artificial
  • Texture: We want cake to be light, fluffy and moist. Dense, crumbly cakes need not apply!
  • Appearance: The cake should look like something we want to dive right into (with plenty of frosting, of course!).

With all this in mind, our Test Kitchen grabbed their forks and dug into eight brands of cake mix including the big names and some store brands.

Want to learn more about how our Test Kitchen chooses their favorite products? Check out our testing methods.

Our Test Kitchen Preferred Cake Mixes

After much cake debate, our Test Kitchen found three mixes that really stood above the rest. Here are the boxes you should keep in your pantry in case of a baking emergency.

Lightest and Fluffiest Yellow Cake: Pillsbury





© Via target.com


Video: These Hot Cocoa K Cups Taste Just Like Your Favorite Candy (My Recipes)

These Hot Cocoa K Cups Taste Just Like Your Favorite Candy

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When you need a good cake mix, don’t hesitate to grab one of the biggest brands in the aisle! Pillsbury yellow cake mix produced a light and airy cake that was also perfectly moist—quite the difficult balance to strike. When it came to flavor, Pillsbury delivered. Our Test Kitchen thought this sponge had that great buttery taste that you want from a yellow cake along with a hint of vanilla to give it just a bit more complexity. You can’t beat this brand for a tender, flavorsome cake, one that will serve as a great foundation for all kinds of desserts.

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Butteriest Yellow Cake: Betty Crocker



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© Via target.com


Baking big shot Betty Crocker’s yellow cake mix produced a light and airy cake with a beautiful golden hue. This brand also offered a good buttery flavor and a nice sweetness that makes you think of a traditional birthday cake. This is a great option for kids’ cakes especially. You can turn it into your own version of a confetti cake by tossing your favorite sprinkles right into the batter.

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Richest Cake: Baker’s Corner from Aldi



a piece of cake sitting on top of a table


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9 attendees at SCOTUS nomination Rose Garden event test positive for COVID-19

A week ago, several top White House officials mingled with guests in the Rose Garden as President Donald Trump officially nominated Amy Coney Barrett to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.

Many of those guests were seen not wearing masks, fist bumping and greeting one another in close proximity, and their seats didn’t appear to be 6 feet apart.

PHOTO: White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, Oct. 4, 2020, at the White House in Washington.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, Oct. 4, 2020, at the White House in Washington.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, Oct. 4, 2020, at the White House in Washington.

On the following Monday, nine days after the event, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany confirmed she had tested positive, becoming the ninth person who attended the affair to become infected. She said she had no symptoms and it wasn’t clear how she might have caught the virus.

On the previous Friday, Utah Sen. Mike Lee, also at the Rose Garden, announced he had tested positive for COVID-19 after experiencing “symptoms consistent with longtime allergies.”

Lee said he took a test only a few days ago “while visiting the White House,” which came back negative. He said he will “remain isolated for the next 10 days” and “will be back to work in time” to pursue Barrett’s nomination.

Prior to her judgeship, Barrett made a name for herself at Notre Dame Law School, also her alma mater. During her 2017 confirmation process, her Notre Dame Law colleagues penned a glowing – and unanimous – endorsement letter.

University of Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins was also at the Rose Garden event and also announced Friday he had tested positive for the virus.

In a statement

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Trump says ‘real test’ lies ahead in his COVID-19 fight

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump said from his hospital room that the next few days will be the “real test” of his treatment for COVID-19, after a series of contradictory messages from the White House caused widespread confusion about his condition.

In a four-minute video posted on Twitter on Saturday from his hospital suite at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, a tired-looking Trump said he was feeling “much better.”

“Over the next period of a few days, I guess that’s the real test, so we’ll be seeing what happens over those next couple of days,” Trump said into the camera, seated in front of an American flag and wearing a jacket and open-necked shirt.

Trump’s illness has upended the campaign ahead of the Nov. 3 presidential election and cast a spotlight on the president’s handling of the pandemic. The Republican president is trailing Democratic rival Joe Biden in opinion polls.

Differing assessments of Trump’s health from administration officials earlier on Saturday left it unclear how ill the president had become since he tested positive for the coronavirus on Thursday night.

A White House team of doctors said on Saturday morning Trump’s condition was improving and that he was already talking about returning to the White House.

Within minutes, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows gave reporters a less rosy assessment, saying, “The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery.”

Meadows, whose initial comments were delivered on condition that he not be identified, altered his tone hours later, telling Reuters that Trump was doing “very well” and that “doctors are very pleased with his vital signs.”

Meadows did not clarify the discrepancy in his comments. A Trump adviser who spoke on condition of anonymity said the president was not happy to learn of Meadows’ initial remarks.

Administration officials have described the move to Walter Reed as precautionary and said Trump would stay for several days.

Another source who was briefed on Trump’s condition said the president was given supplemental oxygen before he went to the hospital. The decision to hospitalize Trump came after he had experienced difficulty breathing and his oxygen level dropped, according to a source familiar with the situation.

White House doctor Sean P. Conley told reporters outside the hospital on Saturday that Trump had not had trouble breathing, and was not given oxygen at Walter Reed.

“The team and I are extremely happy with the progress the president has made,” Conley said.

He declined to give a timetable for Trump’s possible release from the hospital, and later had to issue a statement saying he misspoke after appearing to suggest Trump had been diagnosed as early as Wednesday.

In a statement on Saturday evening, Conley said the president was “not yet out of the woods” but his team remained cautiously optimistic.

“Today’s spectacle –

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Trump says ‘real test’ ahead in his COVID fight after mixed messages from White House

Video: Donald Trump’s doctor suggests president may have had coronavirus on Wednesday 30th (The Independent)

Donald Trump’s doctor suggests president may have had coronavirus on Wednesday 30th

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By Alexandra Alper and Jeff Mason



a man standing on a boat: U.S. President Trump arrives to spend at least several days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland


© Reuters/JOSHUA ROBERTS
U.S. President Trump arrives to spend at least several days at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump told Americans from his hospital room that the next few days will be the “real test” of his treatment for COVID-19, after a series of contradictory messages from the White House caused widespread confusion about his condition.

In a four-minute video posted on Twitter on Saturday from his hospital suite at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, a tired-looking Trump said he was feeling “much better.”



a truck is parked on the side of a road: Trump supporters gather for a car parade


© Reuters/MEGAN JELINGER
Trump supporters gather for a car parade

“Over the next period of a few days, I guess that’s the real test, so we’ll be seeing what happens over those next couple of days,” Trump said into the camera, seated in front of an American flag and wearing a jacket and open-necked shirt.



Donald Trump sitting in a box: U.S. President Donald Trump, who is being treated for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in a military hospital outside Washington, makes announcement via video


© Reuters/THE WHITE HOUSE
U.S. President Donald Trump, who is being treated for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in a military hospital outside Washington, makes announcement via video

The remarks came hours after differing assessments of his health from administration officials left it unclear how ill the president had become since he tested positive for the new coronavirus on Thursday night, a matter of enormous public concern.

A White House team of doctors said on Saturday morning that Trump’s condition was improving and that he was already talking about returning to the White House. One doctor said Trump told them, “I feel like I could walk out of here today.”



a person holding a sign: Supporters rally at a vigil for U.S. President Trump outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he is being treated for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Bethesda, Maryland


© Reuters/JONATHAN ERNST
Supporters rally at a vigil for U.S. President Trump outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he is being treated for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Bethesda, Maryland

Within minutes, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows gave reporters a less rosy assessment, telling them, “The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery.”



Donald Trump holding a pair of people wearing costumes: Supporters hold vigil for U.S. President Trump outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where Trump is being treated for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Bethesda, Maryland


© Reuters/JONATHAN ERNST
Supporters hold vigil for U.S. President Trump outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where Trump is being treated for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Bethesda, Maryland

Meadows, whose initial comments were delivered on condition that he not be identified, altered his tone hours later, telling Reuters that Trump was doing “very well” and that “doctors are very pleased with his vital signs.”

Meadows did not clarify the discrepancy in his comments. A Trump adviser who spoke on condition of anonymity said the president was not happy to learn of Meadows’ initial remarks.

Administration officials have described the move to Walter Reed as precautionary and said Trump would stay for several days.

Another source who was

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After mixed messages from White House, Trump says ‘real test’ ahead in his COVID fight

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump said from his hospital room on Saturday that he felt “much better” but the next few days will be “the real test” of his treatment for COVID-19, capping a day of contradictory messages from the White House about his condition.

In a four-minute video posted on Twitter, Trump, looking tired and wearing a jacket and open-necked shirt, said he “wasn’t feeling so well” when he first arrived at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Friday.

“Over the next period of a few days, I guess that’s the real test, so we’ll be seeing what happens over those next couple of days,” Trump said, seated at a round table in front of an American flag.

The remarks came hours after differing assessments of his health from administration officials left it unclear how ill the president had become since he tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday night, a matter of enormous public concern.

A White House team of doctors said on Saturday morning that Trump’s condition was improving and that he was already talking about returning to the White House. One doctor said Trump told them, ‘I feel like I could walk out of here today.’

Within minutes, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows gave reporters a less rosy assessment, telling them, “The president’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We’re still not on a clear path to a full recovery.”

Meadows, whose initial comments were delivered on condition that he not be identified, altered his tone hours later, telling Reuters that Trump was doing “very well” and that “doctors are very pleased with his vital signs.”

Meadows did not clarify the discrepancy in his comments. A Trump adviser who spoke on condition of anonymity said the president was not happy to learn of Meadows’ initial remarks.

Administration officials have described the move to Walter Reed as precautionary and said Trump would stay at the hospital for several days.

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Another source who was briefed on Trump’s condition said the president was given supplemental oxygen before he went to the hospital. The decision to hospitalize Trump came after he had experienced difficulty breathing and his oxygen level dropped, according to a source familiar with the situation.

White House doctor Sean P. Conley told reporters outside the hospital on Saturday that Trump had not had trouble breathing, and was not given oxygen at Walter Reed.

“The team and I are extremely happy with the progress the president has made,” Conley said.

He declined to give a timetable for Trump’s possible release from the hospital, and later had to issue a statement saying he misspoke after appearing to suggest Trump had been diagnosed as early as Wednesday.

In a statement on Saturday evening, Conley said the president was “not yet out of the woods” but his team remained cautiously optimistic.

“Today’s spectacle – doctors saying one

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