‘It Came Down to What I Could Make at My Kitchen Table’: Amy Sherald on Experimenting With a New Medium for the First Time in Decades

On October 19th, Hauser and Wirth gallery will present a series of five new paintings by artist Amy Sherald in an online exhibition titled “Womanist is to Feminist as Purple is to Lavender.” The title draws from a phrase attributed to Alice Walker and her exploration of “womanist” ideology, which accounted for the intersectional experiences of Black women left out of established feminism, in the anthology titled In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens, from 1983.

In these new paintings, Sherald conducts an examination of identity analogous to Walker’s, experimenting with new materials and themes that celebrate femininity, self-awareness, and leisure through the prism of Blackness. In doing so, the artist reveals expressions of Black life that have been historically absent in Black imagery. She presents simple acts of leisure that are not luxuries of privilege or passive pursuits, but essential elements of wellness that remind us of the restorative power of joy.

Amy Sherald approaches social portraiture with an intentionality that is expressed in the unique characteristics of her paintings. Her grey skin tones have become abstractions of blackness that reject social stratifications that underlie racism and colorism. Sherald paints her subjects on solid color backgrounds that accentuate the contrasting shades of their clothing and the lush texture of their natural coifs. Her intentionality extends to the visual parity the artist creates in the leveled gaze between the subject and viewer, asserting her subject’s rightful place in the pantheon of portraiture.

Taken together, these artistic devices subvert narrow social constructs around blackness while maintain the essence of its beauty. Her work has earned her the critical and popular acclaim that led to her 2018 portrait of First Lady Michelle Obama in the National Portrait Gallery and, most recently, a commission for a portrait of Breonna Taylor featured that became Vanity Fair‘s September cover. Hauser and Wirth’s online exhibition precedes a new solo presentation of Amy Sherald’s work set for February 2021 at Hauser and Wirth in Los Angeles.

Recently, Sherald took precious time out of her schedule to reflect on the new work, Breonna Taylor, caregiving, and creating art during the global pandemic with Artnet News contributor Colony Little.

Amy Sherald, Untitled(Detail) (2020). © Amy SheraldCourtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth.

Amy Sherald, Untitled (Detail) (2020). © Amy Sherald, Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth.

The title of this exhibition, “Womanist is to Feminist as Purple is to Lavender” is a nod to Alice Walker’s famous exploration of womanist theory. How did this quote inform your latest series? There are multiple nuanced interpretations of womanist ideology. What does womanism mean to you as a Black woman and an artist?

I was thinking about a title for this show and I came across it after the work was finished. It’s rare that I go into the studio responding to words or with words in my head. But when I am finished with the work, I like to read poetry and books that connect organically to the themes I’m exploring. I extract phrases or piece together different sentences from various readings.

Read more

Warm fall dishes bring son to the kitchen, table

Friends warned me. People who, before me, had sons. They told me that my son would suddenly and abruptly not want to spend time with me. He would, they said, leave my camp. They said he would first leave me and then leave my husband. At the time it was hard to believe. He was so joyful, so fun, so very excited about the world and all of its gifts.

And then, of course, he did. He found his own interests, his own people, his independence. That was many years ago and I did my best to let him go. It’s good, it’s fine, it’s the way parenting is supposed to be. They grow and push you away and hopefully, if everything is right, they come back.

I’m working on Elliot coming back. He’s 16 now and a pretty laid-back guy. He does what we ask of him. Mow the lawn? Empty the dishwasher? Walk the dog? Yep, yup and did it already. Sometimes, we have to ask twice but it’s not a fight. My husband and I do ask him to hang out with us and to this he almost always says no. He’s got homework. The guys are waiting for him. He’s tired. You know, anything is better than spending time with his parents.

Recently, we’ve been asking him to go for short hikes with us or watch a movie. Heck, I even asked him to sit beside me and learn to knit. That I said knowing there was no way my 16-year-old son would knit. But in asking and showing Elliot my project, I had a few more moments with him.

I’ve also been calling him downstairs when I’m cooking dinner. I’ll place an onion and the chef’s knife on the counter and when he arrives, I point and say, “Chop.” He does it easily, without complaint. I fall in beside him and knowing that teenagers are a bit like scared animals (approach too fast and they run away), I move in slowly. I ask about school, friends, guitar. I keep it to things he likes. I don’t grill him for information; sometimes we just chop quietly.

It’s crazy but I do forget that food is the best thing to bring us together. It’s our common denominator. Elliot doesn’t want to spend an afternoon hiking with Paul and I or even watch a movie. He definitely doesn’t want to knit. But he will chop or stir or whisk, even for a few minutes. If you’ve ever waited for a child who has left your camp, you’ll understand how sweet it is to just stand with him.

What follows are a few things that have come out of my kitchen in recent weeks. Things Elliot has helped me make, and also things his only part in was the eating. I know he would rather have sausage and chicken, pasta and plain salad to vegetables. But while I’m willing to do a lot to bring him back over to

Read more

Food Network Kitchen Sets the Table with New Series BREAKFAST WITH BESSER

Featuring chef Elena Besser.

Food Network Kitchen Sets the Table with New Series BREAKFAST WITH BESSER

Food Network Kitchen, the award-winning, first of its kind culinary app, today announced the premiere of new, original series, Breakfast with Besser, featuring chef Elena Besser chatting with celebrity guests including some of Hollywood’s hungriest stars as she guides them in cooking breakfast dishes specifically crafted for them. From insightful interviews and interactive games, to creative recipes and cooking tips, viewers will be treated to a first row seat at the breakfast table and get a chance to laugh and learn as comedians, actors, and Broadway stars navigate their way through the kitchen. Joining Besser across the 6 episodes will be Lea DeLaria, André De Shields, James Monroe Iglehart, Chris Redd, Dulcé Sloan and Bowen Yang cooking up dishes such as Cheddar Chicken and Waffles, Chicago-style Breakfast Biscuit Egg Sandwich, Devil’s Food Crepe Cake and more. THE TALK show style interaction combined with cooking show level teachable techniques, will give fans a unique experience as each episode unfolds with delicious new recipes and stories.

“Elena Besser brings her charm and culinary know-how to this new series that is sure to have everyone clamoring for a seat at the table,” said Deb Puchalla, SVP Digital Programming & Video for Food Network and Cooking Channel at Discovery Digital Studios. “From the fans to the celebrity guests, everyone will be ready to cook up some new favorite breakfast dishes in their own home kitchens.”

Elena Besser is a trained cook and TV host. After graduating with a theatre degree from Northwestern University, she got her culinary degree at International Culinary Center in SoHo and cooked at Lilia in NYC under Chef Missy Robbins. She has appeared on Food Network, Cooking Channel and Food Network Kitchen. Elena founded THE LINEUP in 2020 as a mission to provide support and exposure to the next generation of great chefs. THE LINEUP shifted gears to release ON THE LINE, a COVID relief cookbook to help the culinary community in a different way. ON THE LINE is a cookbook by and for the cooks, featuring many of the industry’s rising stars who have poured their hearts and souls into highly acclaimed restaurants across the country. Elena’s passion for spreading accessible and exciting cooking and culinary tips to others shines through in Breakfast with Besser.

Food Network Kitchen launched in the United States in October 2019 as a first-of-its-kind direct-to-consumer product with proprietary streaming technology, offering consumers live, interactive cooking classes; on-demand cooking classes; ingredient home delivery; trusted recipes; and direct access to Food Network talent and culinary experts.

Related Articles
View More
TV Stories

From This Author
TV News Desk

Source Article

Read more

New House bill is on the table, here’s who it could help

After weeks of stalled talks, negotiations on another coronavirus stimulus relief package have picked back up, with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaking by phone several times since last Friday on the outlines of a new stimulus bill and a second direct payment that could come with it. 



Talks on a second stimulus check have finally resumed -- here's the latest status update. Sarah Tew/CNET


© Provided by CNET
Talks on a second stimulus check have finally resumed — here’s the latest status update. Sarah Tew/CNET

In parallel with renewed discussions, the Democratic-led House of Representatives unveiled a new economic support bill Monday that includes a second stimulus check of up to $1,200 for qualifying Americans, unemployment benefits, small business loans and airline aid. The $2.2 trillion bill could get a vote in the House this week, Politico reported. It’s based on the original Democratic-backed Heroes Act, which had a larger $3.4 trillion price tag. 



A new stimulus bill could help behind a second check.


© Sarah Tew/CNET

A new stimulus bill could help behind a second check.


Read on to learn the proposed benefits a new stimulus package could contain if it becomes law before or after the Nov. 3 election. For more information, read up on the six top things to know about stimulus checks. We update this story regularly.

As much as $1,200 per American in a second stimulus check

Democratic and Republican lawmakers have agreed on the need for a second direct payment of up to $1,200 per eligible American adult and additional money for dependents (find out who counts as a dependent, and how old you have to be to qualify for a check of your own). 

The new House bill includes similar provisions for stimulus checks as the March CARES Act did and expands who counts as a dependent, following the requirements set out in the Heroes Act. 

Learn more about:

Next stimulus checks: What to expect

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Funding for airlines to prevent layoffs

Payroll protections included in the CARES Act will expire on Oct. 1, and airlines are threatening to lay off thousands of workers after that point. The new House bill includes money for airlines to prevent mass layoffs. 

Loading...

Load Error

Enhanced unemployment pay for millions of job hunters

A stop-gap measure for the federal government to fund $300 a week in enhanced unemployment pay only lasts six weeks and is already ending in some states.

A major point of contention in the debate, Democrats want a new bill to provide $600 per week on top of states’ benefit just like the CARES Act did in March. Republicans want to slim the figure to $300. The Problem Solvers proposal puts the figure at $450 for eight weeks, with an increase afterward. The new House bill includes $600 for unemployment benefits. 

Payroll Protection Program to aid small businesses

Intended to help you retain your job, the Paycheck Protection Program provides forgivable loans to small businesses as an incentive to keep employees on the payroll — people who might have otherwise have lost their jobs during

Read more

New SeaPak Shrimp Sea Pals Bring Fun and Flavor to the Kitchen Table

The SeaPak Shrimp Sea Pals are designed to encourage kids to eat at least two servings of seafood each week, as recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. SeaPak says the new product offers a quick and hassle-free option for families who like to have a little fun with their food.

“At SeaPak, our goal is to make seafood an easy fit for everyday busy life,” says Kristen Beadon, the company’s director of marketing. “We’re always looking for new ways to serve up great-tasting seafood, whether it’s by introducing new flavors, new kinds of seafood or, in this case, new shapes.”

With these sea animal-shaped shrimp sea pals, every meal can now be like an underwater adventure, Beadon adds. “We wanted to create a kid-friendly seafood option for the frozen food aisle, while assuring moms and dads that they could feel good about serving nutritious and delicious shrimp to their children.”

When it comes to satisfying snacks that will support a child’s growth and development, Rachael Hartley, registered dietitian and nutritionist, recommends always including a source of protein in the mix.

The new Shrimp Sea Pals fit that bill, containing an impressive 14 grams of protein per serving. Wrapped in a crunchy, whole-grain breading, the shrimp sea pals also are a good source of dietary fiber and nutrients and do not contain any artificial preservatives or colors.

“As a dietitian, I love that they are made with whole grains,” Hartley says. “With their playful shapes and great taste, SeaPak’s Shrimp Sea Pals make it easy and fun to serve seafood to your family members, even those who may not always be open to new foods.” 

SeaPak Shrimp Sea Pals can be found in the freezer aisle at major retailers and in grocery chains locations nationwide.

To learn more, visit SeaPak.com and the brand’s Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram pages.

About SeaPak

SeaPak has been using coastal-inspired recipes to make great-tasting shrimp and seafood for more than 70 years. The company is committed to helping busy families reduce stress and increase wellness by offering mindful, authentic, quality seafood products. The trusted name for delicious seafood products since 1948, SeaPak today produces America’s No. 1-selling retail frozen shrimp brand within the specialty seafood category. SeaPak is highly regarded within the seafood industry for its adherence to the utmost in quality standards and its commitment to resource management and sustainability. Learn more about the brand and its commitment to sustainability here.

SOURCE SeaPak Shrimp & Seafood Co.

Related Links

https://www.seapak.com

Source Article

Read more

How to Battle Kitchen Burnout (And Still Get Dinner on the Table)

I’m staring into my freezer at eight a.m., pawing through vacuum-packed lumps of chicken and bags of frozen bananas to find anything that might easily turn into dinner. I know I need to use the greens I got last weekend. I dream of someone else fitting all the pieces together.

I’m not cooking tonight, I say to my husband, who is lost in his screen, trying to fit in a few early hours of work before he wakes our daughter. He nods absently.

I start to put away a cookbook that’s sitting out, but stop and scan the photos, picturing how I used to love shutting myself in the kitchen, rolling a tray of herb-dotted meatballs to simmer all afternoon. Spaghetti. There’s a jar of sauce on the shelf. Just make spaghetti.

That night, I go through the motions again.


“Burnout is not the same as stress,” psychotherapist Anna Lindberg Cedar explains to me on the phone. “We experience stress with the adjustment to any life change, positive or negative. Getting married causes stress. Job promotions. But with burnout, you stop functioning. You stop doing the things that you typically care about, or you do them, but not very well, or without much feeling. You begin to lose touch with who you are.”

“The most painful part,” she notes, is that burnout “attacks things that we typically love so much, the activities that used to bring us joy and pleasure.”

I’ll stop here to recognize: It’s a huge privilege to have a fridge with fresh food in it, a cupboard stocked with boxes of pasta. So many families right now are struggling with food insecurity, on top of the pandemic and all of its attendant crises. But whatever you’re facing right now—whether you’re in isolation on your own, or out advocating for racial justice; whether you’re facing a terrifying work situation or smoky orange skies, or juggling childcare and remote learning and all the rest—it’s likely your surge capacity is depleted. And if, like me, cooking was one of your outlets in the past, it’s possible, after all these months of meals, you’ve lost your kitchen mojo, too.

On Instagram, my friend Rachel Khong captioned a recent photo of a home cooked-meal: “Can you believe we have to eat every day?” To many of us, meals—and the decisions required to make them—feel like waves folding one after another onto the shore. It’s relentless. And while a few of my friends still seem to be enjoying their pandemic cooking (and baking) projects, as things unravel, I’m seeing more notes about burnout on my Instagram feed. We are all struggling to feel any spark.

I ask Cedar what we can do. “You do need to give yourself some form of pleasure and rest, even when you’re in a crisis,” she explains. “Giving yourself the time to have access to another sensation”—a moment of pleasure—”is going to be really important for your sustainability.”

And that means, she says, acting against what burnout

Read more

Dear Annie: Divided kitchen table

Dear Annie: My wife and I have just celebrated our ninth wedding anniversary. Two years ago, she decided to become a vegan for moral and dietary reasons. I respect her greatly for that, though I didn’t love constantly hearing about it. I have also adopted many of the same eating habits, but I do still eat meat. We have both learned to prepare very nice vegan dishes that the other enjoys. Lately, however, she has decided to adopt a whole-food, plant-based diet, she also has decided to use a lot of spices in her foods that I cannot eat. For the past two years, I have not cooked meat in our house nor have I fired up my barbecue out of respect for her. Now, I find myself wanting to again cook dishes for myself that I feel are healthy but that include lean meats: chicken fajitas, turkey chili, etc… Do I have the right to cook in my house and if so, how do I approach the subject with her in a way that she doesn’t “flip out”? — Omnivore Husband in Oregon

Dear Omnivore: Your wife wouldn’t appreciate it if you told her how to eat. She should respect your right to decide what you’d like to eat, too. However, I have a feeling that you may want to take a leaf from her book once you see the effects of a whole-food, plant-based diet. It’s one of the healthiest ways to eat and has been shown to be effective against many common chronic diseases, including heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. (Check out “Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease” by Caldwell Esselstyn, M.D., and “The China Study” by T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D., for more information.) So, keep an open mind.

Dear Annie: I am going through a really hard time right now. My husband is dying with stage 4 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in the pancreas. His doctor told me that it’s getting to be time to call in our family. I’m with him 24/7. We have been married for 23 years and have three wonderful children together ages 17 through 21. My husband asked me to tell the hospital that he doesn’t want anyone in the room with him except for me, our kids and three other family members. This doesn’t include any immediate members of his family of origin, and they are blaming me for this. I am doing what my husband asks. His family has not been around us at all this whole time that he has been sick, and now they are wanting to act like they really care. Don’t get me wrong; I really do love my in-laws, but how do I honor my husband’s wishes while not hurting his family? I’m the one with him day and night, never even once leaving the room from him. I don’t want to hurt anyone! — Wife in the Middle

Dear Wife in the Middle: I am so sorry that your husband is dying.

There are no

Read more

Is your Sur La Table closing? The kitchen goods retailer is liquidating more stores by the end of September

Going-out-of-business liquidation sales are now underway at 17 additional Sur La Table stores.

Can shopping malls survive the coronavirus pandemic and more store closings?

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The Seattle-based luxury kitchen goods retailer filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in July and announced plans to close 51 of its 121 stores while looking for a buyer for remaining locations. Five locations were listed as permanently closed in July.

According to a news release Friday, liquidation firms Great American Group, SB360 Capital Partners and Tiger Capital Group are managing the sales at the closing stores, which started Aug. 28, and the initial discounts are up to 30% off original prices, the release said. 



a store inside of a building: Sur la Table is closing at Freehold Raceway Mall.


© David P. Willis
Sur la Table is closing at Freehold Raceway Mall.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Loading...

Load Error

A joint venture by Marquee Brands and CSC Generation, bought the remaining Sur La Table stores, brand and related intellectual property last month, the release said, noting that more than 55 Sur La Table locations will continue to operate across the country.

Save better, spend better:  Money tips and advice delivered right to your inbox. Sign up here

According to the retailer’s website, stores will close by the end of September. Sixty-three locations were listed as permanently closed Friday.

Sur La Table, which is known for offering cooking classes at some of its stores, will not offer classes at closing locations, it said on its customer FAQ page. Classes will continue at select stores and online.

The company previously said the closings are “a result of the financial impact of the COVID-19 crisis.”

J.C. Penney sale: Mall owners Simon and Brookfield to acquire J.C. Penney out of bankruptcy despite ‘screaming matches’

Stein Mart store closings: Stein Mart to close all stores in bankruptcy amid COVID-19 pandemic. Liquidation sales underway

Sur La Table store closings 2020

The following stores are slated to close by the end of September, according to the store locator.

California Sur La Table closing stores

  • Burlingame: 1208 Donnelly Ave.
  • Dublin: Persimmon Place, 5186 Dublin Blvd.
  • Los Angeles: Farmers Market, 6333 W. Third St.
  • Woodland Hills: Village at Topanga, 6316 Topanga Canyon Blvd.
  • San Francisco: Ferry Building Marketplace
  • Santa Monica: 301 Wilshire Blvd.

Florida Sur La Table closures

  • Aventura: 19501 Biscayne Blvd.
  • Sarasota: Pineapple Square, 22 N. Lemon Ave.
  • West Palm Beach: Rosemary Square, 700 S. Rosemary Ave.

Michigan Sur La Table closing store

  • Grand Rapids: Breton South Village, 2500 Burton Street SE

Nebraska Sur La Table closure

  • Omaha: One Pacific Place, 10353 Pacific St.

North Carolina Sur La Table closings

  • Durham: The Streets at Southpoint, 8030 Renaissance Parkway
  • Huntersville: Northcross Commons, 9129 Sam Furr Road

Tennessee Sur La Table closure

  • Germantown/Memphis: Saddle Creek, 7509 Poplar Ave.

Texas Sur La Table closing store

  • Fort Worth: Waterside, 3700 Vision Drive

Virginia Sur La Table closure

Follow USA TODAY reporter Kelly Tyko on Twitter: @KellyTyko

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Is your Sur La

Read more

Diet decisions divide family’s kitchen table | Advice



Annie Lane

Annie Lane


Dear Annie: My wife and I have just celebrated our ninth wedding anniversary.

Two years ago, she decided to become a vegan for moral and dietary reasons. I respect her greatly for that, though I didn’t love constantly hearing about it. I also have adopted many of the same eating habits, but I do still eat meat.

We have both learned to prepare very nice vegan dishes that the other enjoys. Lately, however, she has decided to adopt a whole-food, plant-based diet, she also has decided to use a lot of spices in her foods that I cannot eat.

For the past two years, I have not cooked meat in our house nor have I fired up my barbecue out of respect for her. Now, I find myself wanting to again cook dishes for myself that I feel are healthy but that include lean meats: chicken fajitas, turkey chili, etc.

Do I have the right to cook in my house and if so, how do I approach the subject with her in a way that she doesn’t “flip out”?

— Omnivore Husband in Oregon

Dear Omnivore: Your wife wouldn’t appreciate it if you told her how to eat. She should respect your right to decide what you’d like to eat, too.

However, I have a feeling that you may want to take a leaf from her book once you see the effects of a whole-food, plant-based diet. It’s one of the healthiest ways to eat and has been shown to be effective against many common chronic diseases, including heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. (Check out “Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease” by Caldwell Esselstyn, M.D., and “The China Study” by T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D., for more information.) So, keep an open mind.

Source Article

Read more

Raleigh’s Shepherd’s Table Soup Kitchen desperate for donations :: WRAL.com

— The COVID-19 pandemic has placed new demands on many charitable organizations, like the Shepherd’s Table Soup Kitchen, which has served the hungry in the Raleigh area for 40 years and has never struggled more.

Close to lunchtime, kitchen manager Michael K. Smith begins rolling out packed meals from the kitchen to the sidewalk on Morgan Street in downtown Raleigh where people line up for lunch.

“I love my job,” said. “I love doing this for my people.”

Shepherd's Table Food Kitchen in downtown Raleigh.

Smith is one of just three staff members in the kitchen providing hot lunches to people in need five days a week. In the pandemic, staff and volunteers now have to work harder than ever.

“They have been the backbone of this operation, because what 25 people used to do in a day we’re now doing with five a day,” said executive director Tammy Gregory.

Before March 11, Gregory said companies, especially those in the downtown area, encouraged their employees to spend time volunteering. Then health risks that came with COVID-19 changed everything, with volunteers and donations dwindling and dining rooms meals coming to a halt.

Gregory said it took a day to figure out their next step to feed those in need.

“We have kind of a drive-thru set up, and they can come get lunches,” she said. “We make snack packs too, so they have something for the evening.”

Shepherd’s Table also provides masks, hand sanitizer, sports drinks and water bottles.

Gregory said, since support from the community diminished, the number of hungry people increased.

“They still need food. They have no income. As you know, we’ve lost so many jobs in the hospitality industry,” said Gregory. “These are our neighbors — these are the people you see every day on the street.”

Gregory said the group needs help to meet the need.

“We have over 380 companies just in this downtown area within a four block radius and we’re getting no support,” she said. “We say kindness is shown in different ways. Well, write a check, because that’s kindness for us right now. We need that support now more than ever.”

Gregory said Shepherd’s Table also needs regular donations of canned foods and other non-perishable food. Learn how to support them online.

Source Article

Read more