Great Drinking Glasses to Suit Any Decor

When it comes to drinking glasses, you get what you pay for, and if you’re serving beverages in paper cups, you won’t get many compliments. You’re better off spending a little more on reusable, all-purpose tumblers that can go with anything, whether it’s a casual burger-and-fries lunch or a fancy dinner with china.



a close up of a beverage in a glass cup on a table: Fill them up with your beverage of choice.


© Provided by BetterYou
Fill them up with your beverage of choice.



a glass of wine: The rounded base is one-inch thick, giving it a sturdy foundation and more elegant look.


© Provided by BetterYou
The rounded base is one-inch thick, giving it a sturdy foundation and more elegant look.

Water, juice, beer, wine, coffee or tea? Versatile glasses that can hold a variety of beverages will save you from having to buy separate sets for hot and cold ones. If you’re short on shelf space, look for glasses that stack easily without sticking together.



a clear glass filled with water: These can withstand a range of temperatures, from -4 degrees Fahrenheit to 212 degrees Fahrenheit, and their non-porous design doesn’t absorb colors and flavors.


© Provided by BetterYou
These can withstand a range of temperatures, from -4 degrees Fahrenheit to 212 degrees Fahrenheit, and their non-porous design doesn’t absorb colors and flavors.

For added flexibility, glass sets often offer a variety of sizes, shapes and sometimes even color. Although the number of different sizes vary from set to set, each one should include four- to six-ounce glasses for juice, cocktails and wine and larger 12- to 16-ounce glasses for water and iced tea.



a glass filled with wine glasses: These 100 percent shatterproof, and the two sizes weigh in at a svelte poundage of 0.25 and 0.29.


© Provided by BetterYou
These 100 percent shatterproof, and the two sizes weigh in at a svelte poundage of 0.25 and 0.29.

If you don’t want to be constantly buying replacements, look for sets made of glass that’s resistant to stains, odors and scratching—or sturdy plastic. Also, be extra careful with enamelled glass and crystal, which may contain lead and cadmium, substances that can be transferred from the glass to the beverage contained in it. Tempered glass is generally safe, but when in doubt, here’s a tip: Non-lead glass clinks when tapped, while leaded glass rings.



Parallel rings dress them up for more formal use, and they’re lead-free for safety.


© Provided by BetterYou
Parallel rings dress them up for more formal use, and they’re lead-free for safety.

Glasses with weighted bottoms offer more stability and feel more substantial when you’re holding them. Meanwhile, ripples underneath can help reduce the “sweat” that builds up on a glass when you’re drinking a cold beverage on a hot day.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more

House Suit Over Trump Border Wall Funding Revived by Court

(Bloomberg) — House Democrats’ lawsuit over the Trump administration’s reallocation of government funds to help pay for a U.S.-Mexico border wall has been revived by a federal appeals court in Washington.



a view of a mountain: A border fence that separates the U.S. and Mexico stands in Sunland Park, New Mexico.


© Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg
A border fence that separates the U.S. and Mexico stands in Sunland Park, New Mexico.

The suit accused President Donald Trump of violating the constitution by proceeding with his wall without congressional approval and by using funds that Congress had appropriated for other purposes. A three-judge panel of the appeals court on Friday scrapped a lower-court decision that said the House didn’t have legal standing to challenge the transfer of funds.

“The Executive Branch has, in a word, snatched the House’s key out of its hands,” Judge David Sentelle wrote in a 24-page ruling. “The ironclad constitutional rule is that the Executive Branch cannot spend until both the House and the Senate say so.”

The Department of Treasury did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The legal battle stems from a dispute over wall funding that led to a government shutdown in early 2019. After Congress refused to appropriate the funds the White House had requested to construct the wall, Trump declared a national emergency and allocated a total of $8.1 billion to the project, much of which was designated for other purposes, like combating organized crime.

End-Run Around Congress

The House alleged that the Trump administration violated the Appropriations Clause of the Constitution by doing an end-run around Congress to fund the wall, one of the president’s signature campaign promises.

The court’s decision in favor of the House is unlikely to interfere with border-wall construction anytime soon. Over the summer, another appeals court ruled against the government’s allocation of funds to pay for the wall. But in a 5-4 ruling, the Supreme Court turned down a request from opponents of Trump to halt construction while the litigation continued.

The dispute is part of a series of legal contests between Trump and Congress over the scope of executive authority. The House also sued to force former White House counsel Don McGahn to testify before Congress, challenging the White House’s claim that it has total immunity from such subpoenas.

That court battle seemed resolved in August when the full slate of appeals judges in Washington ruled that Congress has legal standing to sue the executive branch. But the case was sent back to a smaller panel, which found a different basis to reject the suit. The House has vowed to seek another reversal from the full appeals court.

Read More: House Democrats Lose Appeal Over McGahn Testimony Subpoena

(Updates with background starting in fourth paragraph.)

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more

White House Asked Justice Dept. to Take Over Defamation Suit Against Trump, Barr Says

WASHINGTON — The White House asked the Justice Department to replace President Trump’s private lawyers to defend against a woman’s accusations that he defamed her last year in denying her claim that he sexually assaulted her a quarter-century ago, Attorney General William P. Barr said on Wednesday.

The Justice Department’s intervention in the lawsuit means that taxpayer money will be used to defend the president, and it threatens the continued viability of the case of the plaintiff, the author E. Jean Carroll.

Mr. Barr defended the decision to intervene, arguing that it was routine for the department to take over lawsuits against federal officials — substituting the government as the defendant.

“This was a normal application of the law,” Mr. Barr said during a news conference in Chicago. “The law is clear. It is done frequently. And the little tempest that is going on is largely because of the bizarre political environment in which we live.”

Ms. Carroll’s lawsuit has been reassigned from a New York State court to a Federal District Court judge in New York, Lewis A. Kaplan. If he signs off on the department’s certification that it meets the standards to substitute the government as the defendant, he could dismiss the lawsuit because the government has sovereign immunity and cannot be sued for defamation.

Mr. Barr’s public comments were his first since the Justice Department’s abrupt intervention a day earlier in the lawsuit brought by Ms. Carroll last November.

Mr. Barr said the department was responding to a memorandum from the White House requesting that it take over the case under a law called the Westfall Act, arguing that Mr. Trump had acted in his official capacity as president when he denied Ms. Carroll’s accusation that he had sexually assaulted her years ago in a department store dressing room.

Mr. Trump called Ms. Carroll a liar and said he did not know her, even though the two had been photographed together at a party in 1987 with Ms. Carroll’s former husband. He also said she was “not my type.” She then sued him for making defamatory statements about her.

The Carroll case was at a delicate moment for the president when the Justice Department intervened. Mr. Trump’s personal lawyers had tried to put the lawsuit on hold, but a judge ruled last month that it could proceed. That ruling had also seemingly cleared a path for Ms. Carroll’s legal team to pursue its request that Mr. Trump provide a DNA sample to determine whether his genetic material is on a dress she was wearing at the time of the encounter.

The department’s motion to take control of the case came as Mr. Trump’s private lawyers were facing a deadline to appeal an order compelling a deposition and a DNA sample.

In portraying the Justice Department’s intervention this week as unremarkable, Mr. Barr did not explain why the administration had waited more than 10 months to step in.

The move to portray the case as centering on

Read more

Interior Urges Tossing Tax Services Co.’s Suit To Shield Docs

Law360 (September 9, 2020, 1:49 PM EDT) — A Texas-based tax services and software provider’s suit to prevent disclosure of its confidential information should be dismissed because the company brought claims in the wrong court, the U.S. Department of the Interior told a Texas federal judge.

The U.S. government asked the judge Tuesday to dismiss the suit, filed by Ryan LLC to prevent the disclosure of confidential company information. Because Ryan’s headquarters is outside the Texas district of the court where it filed the complaint and Interior is located in Washington, D.C., the case should be dismissed or at the very least transferred, the government said.

“Consequently, the only…

Stay ahead of the curve

In the legal profession, information is the key to success. You have to know what’s happening with clients, competitors, practice areas, and industries. Law360 provides the intelligence you need to remain an expert and beat the competition.

  • Access to case data within articles (numbers, filings, courts, nature of suit, and more.)
  • Access to attached documents such as briefs, petitions, complaints, decisions, motions, etc.
  • Create custom alerts for specific article and case topics and so much more!

TRY LAW360 FREE FOR SEVEN DAYS

Source Article

Read more