Supreme Court won’t take up case challenging school’s policy allowing a transgender student to use bathroom corresponding with their identity

The petition was considered a long shot because of several complicated threshold issues, including the fact that the policy had been put in place five years ago for one student — referred to as “student A” — who has since graduated from the high school located in Dallas, Oregon. At issue was an individualized plan drawn up specifically for “student A.”

In declining to take up the petition, the justices left in place an appeals court decision earlier this year that held that the school’s policy intended to “avoid discrimination and ensure the safety and well-being of transgender students.”

“A policy that allows transgender students to use school bathroom and locker facilities that match their self-identified gender in the same manner that cisgender students utilize those facilities does not infringe Fourteenth Amendment privacy or parental rights or First Amendment free exercise rights, nor does it create actionable sex harassment under Title IX,” Judge Atsushi Wallace Tashima wrote for the appeals court.

The Supreme Court’s action Monday was taken without comment or noted dissent.

The American Civil Liberties Union cheered the court’s move on Monday, saying the justices’ message was that “transgender youth are not a threat to other students.”

“The decision not to take this case is an important and powerful message to trans and non-binary youth that they deserve to share space with and enjoy the benefits of school alongside their non-transgender peers,” Chase Strangio, the deputy director for trans justice with the ACLU’s LGBT and HIV Project, said in a statement.
Federal appeals court sides with student in Virginia transgender bathroom case

Despite Monday’s order, the issue isn’t likely to go away soon. Other lower courts have addressed a related question brought by lawyers for transgender students concerning whether Title IX or the Constitution requires schools to allow transgender students to have equal access to bathrooms consistent with their gender identity. A case on that issue is expected to reach the court early next year.

The transgender bathroom debate has long been a flashpoint for the court. Supporters of LGBTQ rights fear that the Supreme Court’s newly solidified 6-3 conservative majority could prove to be hostile toward policies in favor of transgender students.

In late August, a federal appeals court handed a win to a transgender former student in a years-long fight over restroom policies, ruling that policies segregating transgender students from their peers are unconstitutional and violate federal law prohibiting sex discrimination in education. That decision relied in part on the Supreme Court’s ruling earlier this year in favor of LGBT workers.

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Columbus Police Nab Suspect Who Killed Student Near Frat House

KEY POINTS

  • The suspect in the death of a 23-year-old Ohio State University student has been arrested
  • Chase Meola was shot and killed in the parking area of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house
  • The suspect, 18-year-old Kinte Mitchell, Jr. was later arrested a few blocks away from the scene
  • Police said the incident happened after an altercation when guests were told to leave a house party

The suspect responsible for shooting and killing an Ohio State University student outside a University District frat house was arrested over the weekend.

Columbus police discovered the body of 23-year-old Chase Meola in the parking area of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the corner of Indianola Avenue after 2:00 a.m. Sunday.

Meola, a fifth-year marketing major from Mahwah, New Jersey, was pronounced dead at the scene, the Columbus Dispatch reported, citing a statement from the University.

Ohio State’s neighborhood safety notice said Meola’s death stemmed from an altercation that happened outside after guests were asked to leave a house party. It was here that 18-year-old Kinte Mitchell, Jr. shot Meola and fled on foot, according to The Lantern.

handcuffs This image shows a pair of handcuffs at the Commissariat de Police Nationale (National Police Station) in Alfortville, France, Nov. 21, 2016. Photo: THOMAS SAMSON/AFP/Getty Images

The University extended its condolences to the friends and family of Meola and encouraged those who are in need of support to call the school’s counseling services.

The suspect was later arrested after police located him several blocks away. Mitchell, Jr. was “positively identified” as the shooter and charged with murder. He will be arraigned Tuesday morning, the outlet added.

Sergeant James Fuqua said they are trying to determine what brought Mitchell, Jr. to the party considering that he was not a student of the University. The Columbus Police spokesperson added that they have questioned several other people, but no other charges have been filed.

No other injuries were reported, said the Columbus Dispatch.

“We’re going to continue to gather the facts to figure out why he was there and again not only what led him to a house on campus, but what led him specifically to that gathering and that party,” Fuqua told The Lantern.

Phi Kappa Psi Executive Director Ronald K. Ransom III said in an email Sunday that Meola is not a member of the fraternity, while facilities surrounding the University serve as boarding houses.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the young man who died as a result of the incident,” wrote Ransom in his email.

In June 2018, OSU revoked the fraternity’s student organization status due to hazing and endangering behavior. Phi Kappa Psi is on disciplinary suspension until August 2022.  

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Ohio State student killed in shooting near frat house; suspect arrested

A teen has been arrested in the shooting death early Sunday of an Ohio State University student after an altercation outside an off-campus frat house, according to reports.

Columbus police said they found the victim Chase Meola, 23, in an alley next to the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house.

Officers responded shortly after 2 a.m. for a report of shooting.

OHIO STATE PLAYER OUT OF HOSPITAL AFTER WEEKEND SHOOTING

Mug shot for Kinte Mitchell, 18.

Mug shot for Kinte Mitchell, 18.
(Franklin County Sheriff’s Office)

Police said Kinte Mitchell Jr., 18, was arrested a few blocks away and charged with killing Meola, The Columbus Dispatch reported.

“Reports indicate that individuals were asked to leave a house party in the area, and an altercation occurred outside,” they said.

Police said Mitchell was not a Ohio State student and they were trying to determine how he wound up at the party.

ILLINOIS COLLEGE SHOOTING SUSPECT SURRENDERS IN CHICAGO, SCHOOL SAYS

Phi Kappa Psi had its student organization status revoked in June 2018 and is on disciplinary suspension through August 2022 due to hazing and endangering behavior, according to The Lantern, the Ohio State student newspaper.

“The Ohio State University community is in mourning, and our deepest condolences and support go to the family and friends of Chase,” campus police said in a statement.

Meola was a fifth-year marketing major from Mahwah, N.J.

He was a high school football standout who aspired to work on Wall Street, the Newark Star-Ledger reported.

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“Wall Street is where I would like to see my self in the near future,” he said on LinkedIn, according to the paper. “Ohio State was a great place for me learn and perfect all my skills.”

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Notre Dame student: Father Jenkins, Trump failed COVID-19 leadership test

  • An event held in the Rose Garden may have been responsible for infecting many high-profile politicians with coronavirus.
  • As a Notre Dame student, it was extremely disappointing to see our President, Father John Jenkins, at the event and not following the protocols that we students have been carefully following ourselves.
  • Rachel Palermo is a J.D. candidate at Notre Dame Law School.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Leaders must lead by example. 

Setting policies is an important part of being a leader. But the people who set the rules need to join the rest of us in following them.

As a law student at the University of Notre Dame, I have spent the last few months following important rules that have been imposed by our school.

Early this summer, the Notre Dame administration announced that we would return to in-person classes for the fall semester, even as many colleges and universities converted to fully remote learning. In exchange for being able to attend in-person classes, our community has been entrusted with meeting certain safety expectations.

To name a few: we wear masks at all times, stay six feet away from other people, and refrain from traveling outside of the area. We are often reminded that our responsibilities to one another don’t end once we leave campus.

I understand that the only way to keep our community safe is to take the COVID-19 rules and recommendations seriously, even when they are inconvenient. I’m proud that many other Notre Dame students have demonstrated responsible behavior — on and off campus — because they also understand the stakes are too high. 

Last week, along with many of my classmates, I watched the Rose Garden ceremony for the nomination of our professor, Judge Amy Coney Barrett, with disappointment and embarrassment. 

Setting aside whether or not we believe that nominating someone to the US Supreme Court a month before an election is appropriate, we sat in disbelief as some Notre Dame professors and administrators didn’t wear masks, ignored social distancing guidelines, and even shook hands with other attendees. They broke every rule and guideline that we have been told to follow. 

We watched a potential super-spreader event unfold before our eyes on live television, with familiar faces in the crowd. For those of us who have been social distancing since the spring, watching the ceremony was like observing an alternate reality. 

This week, we learned that Donald Trump, Melania Trump, and other high profile White House officials in attendance at the ceremony tested positive for COVID-19. Trump’s diagnoses came just 48 hours after mocking Joe Biden at the presidential debate for his habit of wearing masks. 

Sen. Mike Lee and former Gov. Chris Christie, who tested positive as well, were captured on video hugging other attendees in the Rose Garden. Our own University President, Father John Jenkins, was also present, flouting both mask and social distancing guidance. He has since announced

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Dems in Key House Races Fear Loss of Critical Student Votes With College Campuses Empty

In a COVID-less world, Dylan Taylor would be in East Lansing now, spending his free time at a table outside the dorms at Michigan State University beckoning fellow Spartans to register to vote. Instead, the 19-year-old treasurer of the MSU Young Democrats is stuck living with his parents in the Detroit suburb of Madison Heights, attending classes via Zoom and trying to replicate election-year campus activism remotely with concepts like “Friend Banking.” “You text people you know and ask them, ‘Are you registered to vote?'” he says. “It is a skewed sample. Everyone says, ‘I’m already registered.’ And then I’m done. It is a lot less effective than being on campus.”



a group of people sitting at a park: Sparsely populated college campuses due to COVID limitations on in-person learning could prove problematic for some Democratic Congressional candidates who rely on student votes and campaign volunteers to help them get elected.


© Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images
Sparsely populated college campuses due to COVID limitations on in-person learning could prove problematic for some Democratic Congressional candidates who rely on student votes and campaign volunteers to help them get elected.

For Democrats in tough House races across the nation who were counting on students from nearby colleges to work as campaign volunteers and to vote, not having Dylan and people like him on campus is a looming political problem. To prevent the spread of COVID-19, nearly half of American college and universities are offering entirely or mostly virtual classes this fall according to the Chronicle of Higher Education, thereby scattering millions of students who might have been cajoled into voting for the first time and then motivated to support Democrats through peer pressure and appearances from big-name campaign surrogates. Polls consistently show college students skew Democratic by a 70-30 percent margin—the exact percentage, in fact, who said they planned to vote for Joe Biden in a poll of 4,000 students enrolled in four-year colleges by the Knight Foundation this August. So the absence of on-campus organizing is widely seen as an advantage for Republicans.

“That’s a really big deal for my

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Anger over Leeds Marsden House student halls’ fire exit ‘tied shut’

A fire exit with wire wrapped around the gate

image copyrightRyan Gleeson

image captionThe fire exit at Marsden House in Leeds was secured with cable ties “to keep out non-resident students”, a student claims

The parent of a Leeds university student said he was “furious” that a fire exit at his son’s accommodation had been tied shut with cable ties.

Marsden House on Burley Road, Leeds, is home to about 900 students.

Ryan Gleeson, whose step-son is studying at Leeds Beckett University, posted a photo of the secured gate at the halls and alerted the fire service.

IQ Student, which manages the building, said it was investigating and student safety was its “highest priority”.

West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service said it had “resolved the issue” after attending the site on Monday.

IQ Student said the gate was “one of several escape routes from the building and is 2m away from an escape route through reception, which is staffed around the clock”.

But students say the gate is also the main point of entry and exit to the halls.

Mr Gleeson’s step-son, who wishes to remain anonymous, said it had been secured shut “all day every day” for four days before the ties were removed.

image copyrightRyan Gleeson

image captionThe adjoining turnstiles had also been blocked to stop people getting in and out, the student said

He claimed he had witnessed security guards securing the gate to keep non-residents from entering the building.

“It doesn’t make us feel very safe when we’re paying so much money to be here. It seems like we’re paying for our own house arrest,” he said.

Mr Gleeson, from Blackpool, said: “I was furious. Absolutely livid that a halls of residence where people are in party mode and will undoubtedly be drinking are put in a greater risk of not being able to find a means of escape from a building and to a point of ultimate safety.

“I understand during fresher’s week students are not entirely blameless in creating a situation but this is an absolutely dangerous way to try and resolve it.”

The fire service said blocking a fire exit was illegal, dangerous, “reckless and puts lives at risk”.

A spokeswoman said IQ Student confirmed “they did not secure the exit” and it was working with the company “to ensure this does not happen again and to identify the individual(s) responsible for securing the exit closed”.

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Male Connecticut College student charged with voyeurism in connection with incident in dorm bathroom, police say

A Connecticut College student was arrested Saturday night and charged with voyeurism after an incident in a dorm bathroom, police said Monday.

Nicholas Spellman, 19, was charged with voyeurism and disorderly conduct after police seized multiple electronic devices, New London police Capt. Brian Wright said.

Police were called to the dorm a few minutes after 10 p.m. Saturday after a reported incident in the bathroom, but police did not release further details Monday. 

Spellman, who is from Wilbraham, Mass., was released on bond and is scheduled to appear Nov. 20 in Superior Court in New London.

Police have asked anyone who has reason to believe they were a victim of of this type of crime or who has information about this incident or others like it to contact the detective bureau at 860-447-1481 or submitting an anonymous text tip to “Tip411” at 847411.

Police made a similar arrest in March 2019 when they charged former student Carlos Antonio Alberti, then 21 years old, with seven counts of voyeurism for allegedly recording female students in dorm bathrooms from October 2018 to January 2019. Alberti pleaded not guilty and pre-trial proceedings are scheduled to begin next month in Superior Court in New London.

Zach Murdock can be reached at [email protected]

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©2020 The Hartford Courant (Hartford, Conn.)

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Cops: CT College student accused of voyeurism in dorm bathroom


NEW LONDON — A Connecticut College student has been arrested in a voyeurism incident on campus, police said.

Shortly after 10 p.m. Saturday, police said they responded to a dorm on the Mohegan Avenue campus for a reported incident of voyeurism in a bathroom.

Police said the suspect, identified as Nicholas Spellman, 19, is a Connecticut College student.

“During police contact with the student, electronic devices were seized,” police said.


Spellman, of Wilbraham, Mass. was arrested and charged with voyeurism and disorderly conduct.

He was released after posting bond will appear in court on Nov. 20.

Police said the investigation is ongoing.


Given the nature of the incident, New London Police encourage anyone who has information concerning these type of incidents or has reason to believe that they may be a victim of this type of crime to contact the New London Police Department’s detective bureau at 860-447-1481 or anonymous information may be submitted via the New London Tips 411 system by texting NLPDTip plus the information to Tip411 (847411).

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student climate protesters urge their universities to go carbon neutral

As West coast wildfires color the skies dystopian red and orange and an aggressive hurricane season batters the US Gulf coast, college students are demanding their schools take bold action to address the climate crisis.



Ramkumar Raman et al. holding a sign posing for the camera: Photograph: Jim West/Alamy


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Jim West/Alamy

Caitlyn Daas is among them. The senior at Appalachian State University and organizer with the Appalachian Climate Action Collaborative (ClimACT) stands on the frontlines of her school’s grassroots push to go “climate neutral”, part of a years-long, national movement that has inspired hundreds of institutional commitments to reduce academia’s carbon footprint.

That concept, ‘our house is burning,’ was a metaphor. But really in 2020, it is literal.

Laura England

Carbon neutrality commitments typically require schools to dramatically cut their carbon emissions by reimagining how they run their campuses — everything from the electricity they purchase to the air travel they fund. Colleges across the country, from the University of San Francisco to American University in Washington DC have already attained carbon neutrality. Other academic institutions, including the University of California system, have taken steps to fully divest from fossil fuels.

But as young activists like Daas urge their universities to do their part to avert climate disaster, many are frustrated by tepid responses from administrators whom they feel lack their same sense of urgency and drive. Appalachian State, part of the University of North Carolina system, has committed to reaching net-zero emissions decades down the line, but Daas and her fellow activists fear that’s far too late. She’s baffled that an institution devoted to higher learning is seemingly ignoring the science around the climate emergency.



a group of people holding a sign: The Detroit March for Justice, which brought together those concerned about the environment, racial justice and similar issues


© Photograph: Jim West/Alamy
The Detroit March for Justice, which brought together those concerned about the environment, racial justice and similar issues

“If our voices don’t matter, can you please stop telling us that they do?” Daas says.

College activists concerned about the climate crisis have largely focused their efforts on two popular movements that go hand-in-hand: reaching carbon neutrality, and divesting university endowments. Broadly, the term “net carbon neutrality” means that a campus zeroes out all of its carbon emissions, says Timothy Carter, president of Second Nature, a nonprofit focused on climate action in higher education. This can be achieved through modifying campus operations, often with the help of alternatives, such as renewable energy certificates and voluntary carbon offsets (activities that atone for other emissions). In Second Nature’s definition, investment holdings don’t factor in a school’s carbon footprint. Carbon neutrality often falls within a wider umbrella of climate neutrality, which also incorporates justice and other concerns.



a man walking across a grass covered field: Students walk at the campus of North Carolina State University in Raleigh, North Carolina on 7 August 2020. Photograph: Jonathan Drake/Reuters


© Provided by The Guardian
Students walk at the campus of North Carolina State University in Raleigh, North Carolina on 7 August 2020. Photograph: Jonathan Drake/Reuters

Divestment campaigns, meanwhile, pressure universities to shed investments in fossil fuels in their endowments. “We cannot truly be climate neutral if we continue to invest in a fossil fuel industry,” says Nadia Sheppard, chair of the Climate Reality Project campus corps chapter at North Carolina State University, where

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US student with positive Covid-19 test throws house party for 20 people while quarantining



a group of people around each other


© Provided by Evening Standard


A student who knew he had tested positive for coronavirus decided to throw a house party while he was supposed to be quarantining.

Police body camera footage broadcast on local TV channel WOIO 19, shows the moment officers confronted the hosts of the house party in Oxford, Ohio, at 4pm on Saturday.

Lieutenant Lara Fening, from the Oxford Police Department, said: “This particular case is egregious, but I think for the most part, by and large, the students have been very well behaved.”

“Officer catches students partying while knowingly Covid-positive”

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Footage shows a young man confess to the officers that he tested positive for Covid-19.

“Are you supposed to be quarantining?” the officer asks. The Miami University student responds: “Yeah. That’s why I’m at my house.”

The officer then says: “So you have other people here, and you’re positive for Covid? You see the problem? How many other people have Covid?”

The officer asks the student “how many other people have Covid?” to which the student responds “they all do” before later backtracking.

He said eight people lived at the house and others had just stopped by. Around 20 people reportedly attended the party.

Police said six people were given citations, five of whom live in the house. The civil penalty caries a $500 (£389) fine.

According to Cincinnati’s Local 12 more than 1,000 students from the University of Miami have tested positive for coronavirus.

Lt Fening added: “Some residents came over from across the street that were reportedly Covid-positive as well.”

She suggested that anyone who attended the party should get tested.

“We do not know if anybody else at that party was aware of the Covid-positive residents because some of them left while the officer was there,” she added.

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