Garden centres struggle to source organic mulch and due to Covid lockdown supply chain issues

Garden centres struggle to source organic mulch and bark chippings due to Covid lockdown supply chain issues

  • Lockdown supply chain problems and increased demand caused shortage 
  • Mulch is applied in spaces between plants and around base of shrubs and trees
  • Autumn is favoured as the ground is warm, meaning more heat and moisture

It is the time of year when those with green fingers think about mulching their shrubs before temperatures plummet and the first frosts arrive.

But lockdown supply chain problems and increased demand have resulted in a shortage of organic mulch products and bark chippings, garden centres have said.

Mulch should be applied in the spaces between plants and around the base of shrubs and trees to strengthen the soil and protect the roots.

It is the time of year when those with green fingers think about mulching their shrubs before temperatures plummet and the first frosts arrive

It is the time of year when those with green fingers think about mulching their shrubs before temperatures plummet and the first frosts arrive

It can be used at any time of year but autumn is favoured as the ground is warm, meaning more heat and moisture can be trapped in the soil. 

Mulch also helps to reduce weeds and provide nutrients for plants.

Materials such as bark chippings, leaf mould, straw, well-rotted farmyard manure and crushed shells can be used to cover the soil. 

But the Garden Centre Association said there was a shortage of mulch and bark chippings, caused by a ‘knock-on effect’ of lockdown which affected the supply of raw materials across the compost sector.

Iain Wylie, chief executive of the GCA, said: ‘Where garden centres are able to source supplies, they are often finding that it is selling out very quickly after delivery.’

However, Vicky Nuttall, of the Garden Industry Manufacturer’s Association, said garden centres may have blips in their supply chains ‘but in general… mulch is out there’.

Materials such as bark chippings, leaf mould, straw, well-rotted farmyard manure and crushed shells can be used to cover the soil

Materials such as bark chippings, leaf mould, straw, well-rotted farmyard manure and crushed shells can be used to cover the soil

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Video: Trump appears to struggle to breathe on walk to White House

  • President Donald Trump can be seen appearing to struggle for breath as he returned to the White House on Monday. 
  • In footage designed to show his recovery, the president climbs stairs and removes his mask before entering the White House. 
  • But after removing the mask the president’s breathing appears labored — one of the most common symptoms of COVID-19.
  • One medical expert said the footage is a “textbook example of increased work of breathing.”
  • Trump in a video Monday night claimed to have recovered from his illness. But his doctor said it would be about a week before it will be clear. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Footage of President Donald Trump returning to the White House on Monday after being treated for COVID-19 in hospital appears to show him having difficulty breathing. 

Trump on Monday evening left hospital despite being still infected with the illness.

Arriving at the White House in front of news cameras he climbed a set of stairs, removed his mask on the balcony, saluted the departing helicopter, and stepped into the building. 

The sequence appeared designed to show that Trump has recovered and is back in business after the diagnosis that left him hospitalized for three days. 

But some medical experts pointed out that Trump appears far from well, commenting on his apparent struggle to breathe.

 

Dr Ilhan Schwarz, an assistant professor at the University of Alberta, Canada, and expert in lung diseases, said Trump’s breathing appeared abnormal.

He said: “This is a textbook example of increased work of breathing. In addition to using normal respiratory muscles (the diaphragm & those between the ribs that expand the chest cavity), ‘accessory muscles’ in his neck are kicking in to help draw a breath.”

A British doctor after watching the footage also concluded that the president remains unwell. 

“He doesn’t look well. If you look at the video on the balcony of the White House he is clearly having difficulty breathing. That is not a man that is better,” Dr Zoe Norris, a general practitioner and lecturer, told BBC Breakfast early Tuesday. 

Trump in a video posted online after his return to the White House claimed to have recovered.

“Now I’m better and maybe I’m immune, I don’t know,” remarked Trump. “Don’t be afraid of it,” he told Americans of the disease. Allies shared a meme showing him wrestling the coronavirus into submission. 

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The image Trump sought to portray with his dramatic return to the White House also clashed with a more sober assessment from his medical team.

In a press briefing earlier in on Monday, Dr Sean Conley told reporters that the president was “not entirely out of the woods yet.” 

However, Conley did say that Trump’s oxygen levels and “his work of breathing are all normal.”

Conley said Trump will “be surrounded

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White House, Congress struggle to complete stop-gap spending bill as October shutdown looms

Trump weighed in on the issue over Twitter, writing: “Pelosi wants to take 30 Billion Dollars away from our great Farmers. Can’t let that happen!”

Trump has already spent several years directing tens of billions of dollars in bailout funds to farmers by using a Depression-era law in a way that even some Agriculture Department officials believed was possibly improper. To continue sending the funds, Trump needs congressional approval, and Democrats have opposed sending more bailout money to farmers because they allege he is using the taxpayer money to try and mollify the political backlash to his trade policies.

Trump announced at a rally Thursday night in the battleground state of Wisconsin that farmers would get an additional $13 billion, money from the same fund that the administration is seeking to replenish via the short-term spending bill.

“We have serious concerns about giving President Trump a blank check to spread political favors,” a senior House Democratic aide involved in the talks said in explaining the Democrats’ opposition to the money. “It is an abuse of taxpayer dollars to give this administration more money so the president can grab headlines with announcements at campaign rallies.” The aide spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.

Additionally, Democrats are seeking more money for food assistance to children impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. They also want $3.6 billion in additional election security funds as part of the short-term bill — something Republicans oppose.

The talks on the short-term spending bill are separate from the stalemate over a new coronavirus relief bill. That standoff showed no signs of budging on Friday, as Pelosi continued to hold out for a $2.2 trillion bill that Republicans have rejected — despite pressure from moderates in her caucus to give ground.

Pelosi dismissed a reporter’s question about whether she was letting the perfect be the enemy of the good regarding the broader coronavirus relief bill. She reiterated that she has already compromised from a $3.4 trillion bill House Democrats passed in May, which the White House and Senate Republicans dismissed.

“It’s not perfect … perfect is $3.4 trillion,” Pelosi said. “This is not about perfect being the enemy of the good.”

Trump has recently signaled he would be comfortable with a bill in the area of $1.5 trillion. Both Trump and House Democrats have said they support legislation that would send another round of stimulus checks to Americans, as well as more unemployment assistance.

The plight of airlines is also a growing area of concern for members of both parties. A provision from the Cares Act that required airlines to keep workers on payroll in exchange for aid expires Sept. 30, and major airlines have warned of mass lay-offs.

In a letter Friday to congressional leaders and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, the head of United Airlines and the leaders of several major airline unions urged Congress to renew negotiations on a new covid relief bill that would include an extension of the airline Payroll Support Program. The

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