The White House has dodged questions for six straight days about when Trump last tested negative for the coronavirus

At least three other White House officials have dodged the same question for six straight days, examples of which you can watch in the video above. Trump’s last negative test is one of several pieces of incomplete or contradictory information about his coronavirus infection that the White House has refused to clarify. Health experts have said the negative test information is needed to know how long Trump may have been contagious and who might have to isolate after coming into contact with him.

On Saturday, White House physician Sean Conley declined to say when Trump last tested negative.

On Tuesday, Morgenstern said he did not know when Trump last tested negative.

And by Thursday, White House communications director Alyssa Farah told reporters, “I can’t reveal that at this time, the doctors would like to keep it private.”

Earlier this week, two officials familiar with the situation told The Washington Post that Trump had not been tested daily for the virus in recent months.

In the six days before he announced his positive test Trump traveled to six cities, including to Cleveland for the first presidential debate Sept. 29.

On Friday, the nation’s top infectious-disease expert, Anthony S. Fauci, called the Barrett ceremony a “superspreader event.”

“We had a superspreader event in the White House, and it was a situation where people were crowded together and were not wearing masks,” Fauci told CBS News. “So the data speak for themselves.”

Source Article

Read more

The White House medical team isn’t giving straight answers on President Trump’s health

The White House physician, surrounded by a group of other doctors, emerged just before noon on Saturday from Walter Reed medical center to give a sunny update on President Donald Trump’s condition after his positive Covid-19 diagnosis.



a group of people posing for the camera: White House physician Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley giving an update to the press about President Donald Trump's health as he is being treated at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for Covid-19 on October 3, 2020.


© Pool
White House physician Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley giving an update to the press about President Donald Trump’s health as he is being treated at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for Covid-19 on October 3, 2020.

“This morning the President is doing very well,” said Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley, adding: “The President is fever-free for over 24 hours.”

Roughly half an hour after that rosy assessment, came this from a “source familiar with the President’s health” speaking to the print and TV pool reporters, “The President’s vitals over the last 24 hours were very concerning and the next 48 hours will be critical in terms of his care. We are still not on a clear path to a full recovery.”

Uh, what? It’s not hard to reconcile what Conley said about Trump’s current condition with what the “source familiar with the President’s health” said mere minutes later. It’s impossible to reconcile the two statements.

And the net result is that the public has no real idea what condition Trump is actually in. Does he have a very mild case of the virus as spokespeople and allies — and Conley — have suggested since we learned he was positive for coronavirus early Friday morning? And that he was taken to the hospital out of an abundance of caution? Or are there real concerns that Trump’s condition is far more serious, as the use of an experimental Regeneron polyclonal antibody cocktail — not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration — and the eerie background quote suggest?

There’s simply no way of knowing, which is the problem. The President of the United States is the single most powerful person in the country — and one of the most powerful in the world. The specifics of his current health matter for a number of reasons, but chief among them is — if he is indeed sicker than Conley is letting on — maintaining the continuity of government.

Contributing to the uncertainty is the fact that Trump has long obfuscated when it comes to his medical health prior to coming into the White House in 2017. In fact, we know less about his health than we do any modern president.

Consider this: Trump released zero medical records when he ran for president in 2016. What he did release was a letter from Dr. Harold Bornstein, his longtime personal physician, that asserted simply: “If elected, Mr. Trump, I can state unequivocally, will be the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency. His physical strength and stamina are extraordinary.”

Which, of course, is crazy. Bornstein had never examined any past president. So his ability to claim that Trump would be the “healthiest individual” ever to be president is roughly equivalent to my ability

Read more

Chilaquiles Straight from a Chef’s Home Kitchen

In December, Juan Sánchez, who was then a chef at Made Nice, Eleven Madison Park’s casual sister restaurant, started an Instagram account: @citlali_cocina. After five years in New York, Sánchez had noticed that the city’s Mexican food was mostly confined to the styles of a few regions, including Puebla, in central Mexico, and Oaxaca, in the south. Citlali Cocina would be a small way to highlight the cuisine of his home town, Guadalajara, and a place to collect ideas for the restaurant that he hoped to open someday.

Sánchez gets his corn tortillas from the Bronx and cuts them into postage-stamp-size squares before frying them. His salsa is made with tomatillos and two kinds of chilis.Photograph by Caroline Tompkins for The New Yorker

The first photo he posted was a glamour shot of a quesadilla, a pale corn tortilla topped with thick, melty strands of quesillo, a stretchy cheese, and a leaf of epazote, an aromatic herb, sprinkled with tequesquite, a mineral salt used since the pre-Hispanic era. A video followed: glistening chunks of birria de res, beef marinated in chilis, spices, and herbs, covered in banana leaves, and cooked for four hours.

On Christmas Eve, there appeared a tantalizing image of a bowl piled with a poached egg, coarsely crumbled white cheese, and wispy greens, under which peeked the corners of tortilla chips coated in red salsa. Beside it was a mug containing a dark, glossy beverage. “There’s nothing like waking up to a warm hug of chilaquiles and café de olla,” the caption read. How could Sánchez have known that he was describing his future business model?

Sánchez, who was furloughed from his job as a chef in March, hopes to own his own restaurant someday but, in the meantime, has turned his Greenpoint apartment kitchen semi-professional.Photograph by Caroline Tompkins for The New Yorker

In March, Sánchez was furloughed from Made Nice and began to while away quarantine by drafting a dream menu. By summer, he had decided that he didn’t have to wait to open a restaurant, and in August he turned the kitchen in his Greenpoint apartment semi-professional, accepting orders for pickup once a week, between 11 A.M. and 2 P.M. on Sundays. There was only one thing on the menu: warm hugs in the form of chilaquiles.

Chilaquiles is a dish popular all over Mexico, in endless iterations, especially for breakfast or brunch. (It can work wonders on a hangover.) The common denominator is stale tortillas—chilaquiles is to Mexican tortillas as pain perdu is to French bread—cut up and fried into chips, then tossed in salsa on the stove or in the oven; the less time cooked, the crispier the final dish.

There’s nothing about Sánchez’s version that makes it particularly Guadalajaran. His recipe is as unique to him as his accent, which sounds distinctly Mexican but also a bit Liverpudlian; he lived in England for two years. He gets his corn tortillas from the Bronx, cuts them into postage-stamp-size squares,

Read more

New White House coronavirus adviser Atlas says he’s a ‘straight shooter’

Dr. Scott Atlas, the controversial newest addition to the White House Coronavirus Task Force, says he is a “straight shooter.” He proceeded to demonstrate that in a lengthy and wide-ranging interview with BBC Radio Friday.



a man wearing a suit and tie: FILE - In this Aug. 12, 2020, file photo Scott Atlas, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, speaks at a news conference in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House in Washington. Trump has announced that Dr. Scott Atlas, a frequent guest on Fox News channel, has joined the White House as a pandemic adviser.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)


© Andrew Harnik/AP/FILE
FILE – In this Aug. 12, 2020, file photo Scott Atlas, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, speaks at a news conference in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House in Washington. Trump has announced that Dr. Scott Atlas, a frequent guest on Fox News channel, has joined the White House as a pandemic adviser.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Atlas, a neuroradiologist who wrote a book on magnetic resonance imaging, said it doesn’t matter that he has no expertise in epidemiology or infectious diseases; he accused public health experts of ignoring data; said the US was doing better compared to Europe in terms of coronavirus deaths and claimed — incorrectly — that the case fatality rate in the US is down by more than 90%.

Atlas said ongoing restrictions to try to control the coronavirus pandemic are having worse effects than the virus itself.

“The impact of prolonging the lockdown is worse than the impact of the disease,” Atlas told the BBC Radio Newshour.

“There is a worse outcome from prolonging the lockdown and I think everyone knows that,” said Atlas, who is also a senior fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.

“We are not advocating – I am not advocating – less mitigation. What I’m advocating is using logic and rational reasoning to understand the harms of locking down,” Atlas said.

Atlas referred to reports showing some cancer patients are skipping chemotherapy, stroke patients are not going to the ER, childhood immunizations are down, and more people have contemplated suicide during lockdown.

“This is because of the lockdown. This is because of the isolation. This is not direct damage from the virus,” he said.

Atlas has been criticized for comments made earlier this year in defense of a herd immunity strategy for handling the pandemic. He has denied this and denied that he argued for letting the pandemic run its course.

“I have never, literally never, advised the President of the United States to pursue a strategy of herd immunity, of opening the doors and letting people get infected. I have never advised that, I have never advocated for that to the task force, I have never told anybody in the White House that that’s what we should be doing,” Atlas said.

He also said that the concept of herd immunity is not controversial.

“It is known to exist, if you don’t understand herd immunity as an immunologist or as a doctor or anyone involved in the discussion about this, there’s something, you know, missing from your knowledge,” Atlas said. “Herd immunity is a phenomenon.”

Herd immunity develops when enough people get an infection and when there is a vaccine, Atlas said.

“That is the whole purpose of generating a vaccine,” he said. “That is the main purpose

Read more