State Farm teams up with Scarborough Fire Department to serve up kitchen safety

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and State Farm agent Michelle Raber are teaming up with the Scarborough Fire Department to support Fire Prevention Week, an annual public awareness campaign promoting home fire safety.

State Farm agents are delivering Fire Prevention Week toolkits to more than 2,500 fire departments across the country, including Scarborough. Each toolkit includes resources for Fire Prevention Week, taking place Oct. 4-10, including brochures, magnets, posters and more. The Fire Department will be sharing these resources with schools and communities this fall in support of the campaign.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen” focuses on cooking fire safety. Home cooking fires represent the leading cause of all fires with nearly half – 49 percent – happening in the kitchen. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of these fires.

“The good news is that the majority of kitchen fires are highly preventable,” said State Farm agent Michelle Raber. “These great kits will help our fire departments spread the news to always stay focused when you’re in the kitchen and never leave the kitchen unattended.”

Key messages around this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign will include the following:

• Keep a close eye on what you’re cooking; never leave cooking unattended

• Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — at least three feet away from your stovetop.

• Be on alert. If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.

For more information about Fire Prevention Week and this year’s theme, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen,” visit fpw.org.


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Colorado State House District 45 candidate Q&A

Why are you seeking public office?
It’s time for Douglas County to have a representative who is more inclusive. I’m heartbroken at the provocative anti-LGBTQ+ legislation introduced by the current representative. I’m a second amendment supporter, gun owner and sport shooter who believes in common sense gun legislation.

What will your top three priorities be if elected?
1- Providing resources to combat COVID using science and data.

2- Dismantle TABOR

3- Address Education needs such as funding, class size and teacher evaluations.

Do you support some type of public option health insurance or Medicare for All at the state level? If so, which and why? If not, why not?
Access to medical care, including physical, mental and women’s healthcare are a human right. This would enable every resident, especially children to enjoy a happier, healthy and productive life.

Have your views on policing and racism in Colorado changed this year? If so, how?
Recent events prove the police are grossly mishandling incidents involving people of color. Racism and bias were always suspected, but this year we have irrefutable proof of that from across the country. I’m particularly disturbed by the image of a black family being made to lie on the hot asphalt during a “stolen car” investigation in Aurora. I can’t imagine the same happening to a white family. And that’s the glaring difference.

Do you place a greater importance on addressing climate change or preserving Colorado’s oil and gas industry? What steps would you take on these issues as a lawmaker?
Climate change is an emergency for our planet. Colorado can take the lead in showing how to reduce fossil fuel emissions by investing in clean renewable energy. Colorado is a great location for both wind and solar energy. The “Just Transitions” program is an agreement between industries and unions to move carbon fuel workers into well paid clean energy jobs. I will do all I can to support this.

Should Colorado consider any new gun laws? If so, which do you support?
Two new gun laws are safe storage and increased concealed carry training. Safe storage would mandate that guns not in the possession of the owner should be securely locked away to prevent theft, reduce suicides, and prevent accidental shootings. Gun owners should carry firearm insurance to mitigate damages done by unsecured firearms. As a person who has completed several concealed carry classes I find the standards and training for a permit to be grossly inadequate. Training should be standardized, include live firing and simulations of stressful situations, as well as regular ongoing training to raise awareness and skill of those carrying deadly weapons.

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Texas Dems highlight health care in fight to flip state House

Texas Democrats are making health care the heart of their final pitch as they look to flip the state House, which Republicans have held since 2002.

In a “contract with Texas” that Democrats are rolling out Thursday and which was shared first with The Hill, the party is touting policies it would try to enact should it flip the net nine seats it needs to gain control of the chamber. The central pillar of the plan is expanding Medicaid in Texas, which has the highest number and rate of uninsured people in the nation, as well as boosting coverage for children and making care for women more equal. 

The party is betting that voters in the state who normally rank health care as a top issue will be even more receptive to messages around expanding coverage in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, which has hit the Lone Star State particularly hard. And after Democrats across the country won in a “blue wave” in 2018 fueled by promises to improve coverage, Texas Democrats are confident their strategy will work. 

“I think we have seen for a while now, before the pandemic, before any of us heard of coronavirus, that health care was a top-ranked issue, really across the country. Certainly in the 2018 elections, health care was a key issue that year,” said state Rep. Chris Turner, chair of the Texas House Democratic caucus. “But this year, with this pandemic, with the health care crisis that is affecting everyone, it’s just through the roof right now. People expect policymakers to address health care access.” 

The heart of the Democrats’ “Affordable Health Care for Every Texan” plan is providing coverage for 2.2 million more residents by expanding Medicaid, which the party says would also lower premiums and prescription drug prices for all Texans. Estimates from the party gauge that Texas would receive $110 billion in federal money over a decade if Medicaid is expanded. 

The plan also calls for expanding coverage for children by extending children’s Medicaid “through 12 months of continuous eligibility to align with [the Children’s Health Insurance Program].”

Lastly, Democrats look to bolster women’s health care by ensuring access to abortion — including by ensuring clinics that offer the procedure receive proper funding — and reducing maternal mortality rates, including bringing down the disproportionate rate at which Black mothers die during childbirth.

The party is also eyeing other health care-related legislation, including bills to strengthen protections for people with preexisting conditions if ObamaCare is repealed and ending surprise medical billing.

Texas Democrats have long lamented Republicans’ policies on health care in the state, including their refusal to expand Medicaid and work to curb abortion access, but indicate those efforts would face reenergized resistance if they win back the state House.

“Without the gavel, we haven’t been able to dictate the tone and tenor of what happens on the floor, so this time around we will be able to keep divisive and hurtful legislation off the floor and we’ll

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Seven Interior state candidates to participate in forum hosted by environmental, racial justice groups | Local News

Seven of the 16 candidates running for election to Interior seats in the Alaska Legislature will be participating in a Climate, Jobs and Justice political forum hosted by a group of Alaska environmental and social justice nonprofits and organizations tonight.

The forum will be held online from 5-7 p.m. and is hosted by Fairbanks Climate Action Coalition, The Alaska Center, Fairbanks Climate Action Coalition, Greater Fairbanks Chapter NAACP 1001, the Nanook Diversity & Action Center, Native Movement, Native Peoples Action and Planned Parenthood Votes Northwest and Hawai’i.

The following candidates have confirmed plans to participate: 

House District 1 Democratic candidate Christopher Quist

House District 2 Democratic candidate Jeremiah Youmans

House District 4 Democratic Rep. Grier Hopkins

House District 5 Democratic Rep. Adam Wool

House District 6 Democratic candidate Julia Hnilicka;

House District 6 nonpartisan candidate Elijah Verhagen

Senate District B nonpartisan candidate Marna Sanford.

According to event organizers, an invite was sent to all candidates running for Interior seats in both the state House and state Senate. All seven Republican candidates and two nonpartisan candidates either declined to participate or did not respond to the invite for the forum, organizers said.

The forum will discuss issues ranging from climate action, workers advocacy, social and economic justice and healthcare access.

“The top priorities for the people of Alaska, including health care access, racial and economic justice, climate action, Alaska Native rights, and workers’ rights, don’t always get the attention they deserve. We’re excited to offer this nonpartisan forum to center these critical issues and expand the conversation with our community leaders,” said Rose O’Hara-Jolley of Planned Parenthood Votes Northwest and Hawai’i on behalf of the organizers.

To ensure proper precautions during the COVID-19 pandemic, the forum will be held online via Zoom. 

Community members interested in participating can register in advance at

bit.ly/ClimateJobsJustice

StateForum.

Contact staff writer Erin McGroarty at 459-7544. Follow her on Twitter: @FDNMpolitics. 

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Colorado State House District 33 candidate Q&A

Why are you seeking public office?
It’s been an honor to serve the people of Broomfield, Superior and Erie over the past four years. We’ve accomplished a lot in advancing paid family and medical leave, criminal justice reform and protecting people who need unemployment insurance in an unprecedented time. We still have a lot of work to do on improving transportation and public education, and I’m excited to do it.

What will your top three priorities be if elected?
Finally funding transportation adequately, finally funding public education adequately, and implementing paid family and medical leave.

Do you support some type of public option health insurance or Medicare for All at the state level? If so, which and why? If not, why not?
I support a public option if structured responsibly, and I trust those working on it. Medicare is a federal program so can’t be implemented at the state level.

Have your views on policing and racism in Colorado changed this year? If so, how?
I learned most about the criminal justice system when I was working in it every day as a prosecutor. I’ve also done a lot of listening in the past year from folks in the community.

Do you place a greater importance on addressing climate change or preserving Colorado’s oil and gas industry? What steps would you take on these issues as a lawmaker?
I think you can be smart about both. As we actively transition to renewable energy, we still need oil and gas, which we can manage responsibly. We also need to address the global threat of climate change, where we’re far behind where we need to be.

Should Colorado consider any new gun laws? If so, which do you support?
Gun safety is an important issue that we should always have an open mind about. We haven’t stopped the epidemic of gun violence, and we shouldn’t stop working until we do.


Why are you seeking public office?
I have the passion and desire to serve my community. I will safeguard our liberties for our children and our grandchildren. I will stand up against government overreach and special interest agendas. I will faithfully support our unalienable constitutional rights. I bring voice of reason, balance, and will represent ALL the residents of House District 33.

What will your top three priorities be if elected?
My top priorities are fighting for school choice, parental choice, community

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Colorado State House District 3 candidate Q&A

Why are you seeking public office?
I’ve been privileged to serve in the Colorado State House for two years and I’m proud of what we have accomplished. I am seeking re-election to continue to work for all Coloradans, not special interests.

What will your top three priorities be if elected?
My priorities continue to be adequate and equitable funding for public education, to preserve Colorado’s air, land, and water, and to ensure an economy that works for all.

Do you support some type of public option health insurance or Medicare for All at the state level? If so, which and why? If not, why not?
I am in favor of increasing accessibility to and affordability of health insurance and think a public option should be considered.

Have your views on policing and racism in Colorado changed this year? If so, how?
The urgency for action to address systemic racism and policing became very apparent this year. I am proud of our first-in-the nation, landmark, bi-partisan police accountability bill, SB217.

Do you place a greater importance on addressing climate change or preserving Colorado’s oil and gas industry? What steps would you take on these issues as a lawmaker?
It is unfortunate that this question presupposes that the two cannot coexist. As demonstrated in SB19-181 we can place health and safety as the priority of the oil and gas commission, continue to issue permits and address climate change.

Should Colorado consider any new gun laws? If so, which do you support?
Yes I am in favor of common sense gun violence prevention measures, including reporting of lost and stolen firearms, and safe storage measures.


Why are you seeking public office?
I believe that one party Democrat rule in a city or a state over a period of time will lead to the same outcomes we can see in places like California, Portland, Seattle, Chicago and others. Outcomes include more poverty, more homelessness, more lawlessness, sky high taxes, budgets busted by debt and poor management, over regulation and, most importantly, loss of individual freedoms. Colorado can become a place where citizens recognize that their values are “cancelled” and they feel compelled to move out.

What will your top three priorities be if elected?
1. EDUCATION EQUITY. Having served on the State Review Panel for 9 years and and evaluating the lowest academically

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Ex-Belarusian presidential candidate Svetlana Tikhanovskaya placed on ‘wanted’ list in Russia, under Union State treaty with Minsk

Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, the main opposition candidate in Belarus’ disputed August presidential election, has been placed on the interstate wanted list by Russia’s Interior Ministry. The move follows a request by police in Minsk.

The database on the ministry’s website says that Tikhanovskaya is wanted as part of a criminal case. However it doesn’t specify which article of the criminal code she’s suspected of violating, or the precise crime she’s accused of in her homeland. 

A police source told Moscow news agency TASS that Tikhanovskaya is facing criminal charges in Belarus, but Russian law enforcement is also obliged to look for her, as this is how the interstate wanted list works. They allow for the arrest and extradition of suspects among the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) members, which includes Russia, Belarus, and seven other former Soviet republics.

The Belarusian Investigative Committee has launched a criminal case against Tikhanovskaya over her calls for a seizure of power, which carries a penalty of up to five years in prison. It began after the 38-year-old initiated the creation of an opposition coordination council, tasked with transferring authority in the country to her from President Alexander Lukashenko.

According to official results, Tikhanovskaya secured ten percent of the vote in the Belarusian presidential election on August 9, which was overwhelmingly won by the country’s longtime leader, Alexander Lukashenko, according to the disputed official count.

The opposition refused to accept the results of the vote, insisting that it was rigged by the government.

Belarus has been gripped by protests since then, with thousands taking to the streets every weekend demanding Lukashenko’s resignation and calling for a new election.  




Also on rt.com
‘I am the only leader’: Exiled Belarusian opposition figure Tikhanovskaya claims presidency after Lukashenko’s secret inauguration



Tikhanovskaya, who claims that she’s the rightful president, fled the country for Lithuania several days after the vote over fears of persecution by the authorities in Minsk.

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Trump adviser says state funding got in the way of stimulus deal

  • President Donald Trump told White House negotiators to table stimulus talks until after the election.
  • The acting director of the Domestic Policy Council, Brooke Rollins, told Insider in an exclusive interview that state funding was the biggest area of disagreement. 
  • “I think he just realized that it’s just so far apart, and ultimately to best serve the country it’s better to wait and revisit once we’re out of the political maelstrom,” she said. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

A coronavirus stimulus deal between Democrats and the White House fell apart largely because the sides couldn’t agree about how much money to give budget-crunched states, according to one of President Donald Trump’s top advisers. 

“Where the Democrats came down was so far out of — no pun intended — out of left field in terms of the trillions of dollars that they wanted to bail out states and cities,” Brooke Rollins, the acting director of the president’s Domestic Policy Council, said Tuesday in an exclusive interview with Insider. 

Trump announced his surprise decision to walk away from another stimulus package in a series of tweets Tuesday. The decision came a day after he left the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center despite still being sick with COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. While hospitalized, the president had used his prolific social media account to urge Congress to reengage with his administration on negotiations over a new stimulus bill. 

Stocks fell sharply after Trump’s announcement on Tuesday, with the Dow Jones industrial average plummeting almost 400 points. The talks on a new stimulus broke down while the US economy continues to reel from the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed more than 210,000 people and put millions out of work as businesses shut down.

 

‘We tried really, really hard’

Speaking with Insider just minutes after the president’s tweets, Rollins said there were several factors that influenced his decision to back out of talks. But she singled out the Democrats’ demand for funding to the states as a no-go because the White House saw that as primarily intended to help bail out blue states and cities whose governments had mismanaged taxpayer dollars. 

“I think he just realized that it’s just so far apart, and ultimately to best serve the country it’s better to wait and revisit once we’re out of the political maelstrom,” she said. 

Rollins said she wasn’t sure how close House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin had been to reaching a deal before the president’s announcement. The Domestic Policy Council that she leads is an influential body in the White House that’s made up of top Cabinet members. It also meets regularly with Trump.   

“I know we tried really, really hard,” she said.

Read more: Meet the 24 most powerful people advising Trump on healthcare as the president vies for a second term

Nancy Pelosi

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the

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Trump returns to White House, state GOP files lawsuit against Pritzker tax amendment and the return of Dark Lord imperial stout



a bottle of wine on a table: Three Floyds Brewing in Munster, Ind. will release its coveted Dark Lord imperial stout via touch-free pick up this fall instead of at its usual Dark Lord Day festival in the spring.


© Gregg Gearhart / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Three Floyds Brewing in Munster, Ind. will release its coveted Dark Lord imperial stout via touch-free pick up this fall instead of at its usual Dark Lord Day festival in the spring.

Want Daywatch delivered to your inbox? Sign up here. 5/8 Get the top Tribune stories of the day on your smart speaker 5/8 Here’s how to get the most out of your Tribune subscription 5/8 Got something to say? Join the conversation on our Facebook page



a man talking on a cell phone: Cubs President Theo Epstein talks with GM Jed Hoyer and manager David Ross before a game against the White Sox on Sept. 25, 2020, at Guaranteed Rate Field.


© John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Cubs President Theo Epstein talks with GM Jed Hoyer and manager David Ross before a game against the White Sox on Sept. 25, 2020, at Guaranteed Rate Field.

Good morning, Chicago. Illinois public health officials reported Monday 1,853 new known coronavirus cases and 14 additional confirmed deaths. In Chicago, the positivity rate has increased over the last three days: it’s now at 4.4%.

Meanwhile, the CDC updated to its COVID-19 guidelines to say the virus can spread more than 6 feet through the air. Some experts said the updated guidance isn’t enough — here’s why.

Also, a Chicago-area study showed that nearly one-third of coronavirus patients experienced some type of altered state. The neurological symptoms identified ranged from confusion to delirium to unresponsiveness.

Here’s more coronavirus news and other top stories you need to know to start your day.

Trump, after receiving unprecedented level of care, downplays COVID-19 threat and returns to White House — without a mask

President Donald Trump staged a dramatic return to the White House Monday night after leaving the military hospital where he was receiving an unprecedented level of care for COVID-19. He immediately ignited a new controversy by declaring that despite his illness the nation should not fear the virus that has killed more than 210,000 Americans — and then he entered the White House without a protective mask.



a man standing next to a tree: Scott Sheridan, a tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, is losing his job as the school eliminates many offerings in the humanities.


© Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Scott Sheridan, a tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, is losing his job as the school eliminates many offerings in the humanities.

Trump’s message alarmed infectious disease experts and suggested the president’s own illness had not caused him to rethink his often-cavalier attitude toward the disease, which has also infected the first lady and several White House aides, including new cases revealed on Monday.

GOP-aligned group files lawsuit challenging ballot language on Pritzker’s graduated-rate income tax amendment

The Illinois Policy Institute, a GOP-aligned group opposed to Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s graduated-rate income tax plan, filed a lawsuit suit Monday contending the explanation of the proposed state constitutional amendment sent to voters was “misleading” and needs court-ordered clarification.



J.B. Pritzker wearing a suit and tie: Gov. J.B. Pritzker holds a news conference at the James R. Thompson Center in Chicago on Sept. 22, 2020.


© E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Gov. J.B. Pritzker holds a news conference at the James R. Thompson Center in Chicago on Sept. 22, 2020.

The Pritzker-backed Vote Yes for Fairness group backing the proposed amendment called the lawsuit “frivolous” and said it was simply an attempt to gain attention to efforts to

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State Rep. Stephanie Kifowit to challenge House Speaker Michael Madigan for leadership post he’s held for decades

Four-term Democratic state Rep. Stephanie Kifowit of Oswego said Thursday she will challenge longtime Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan for leadership of the chamber when the new General Assembly is seated in January.

Kifowit is one of a handful of House Democrats who have called for Madigan’s resignation since federal prosecutors unveiled a deferred prosecution agreement with Commonwealth Edison in July in which the state’s largest utility admitted to a yearslong bribery scheme aimed at currying favor with the powerful speaker.

A Marine Corps veteran, Kifowit has been in the House since 2013 and is running for reelection unopposed in the November.

Kifowit said in a statement that she called for Madigan to resign “for compromising the integrity of the office and undermining public trust.”

“The response from Michael Madigan was to double down and has remained that way,” Kifowit said. “It is clear to me that he doesn’t hold the same values that I do and falls short of what the public expects from an elected official.”

Kifowit’s decision to challenge Madigan a month before the election puts vulnerable House Democrats and Democratic candidates, particularly in the suburbs, into an even more awkward position leading up to the election—whether to back Madigan or her or someone else.

It is a question many were hoping to wait out until after the election despite repeated attacks by Republicans on the issue. But her run provides new fuel to the issue.

There are also questions about the extent of support for her candidacy. Madigan still holds the power and controls the purse strings in the Democratic caucus and has made loyalty paramount during his decades long tenure as speaker.

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Madigan has not been charged in connection with the ComEd probe and has denied any wrongdoing.

At the request of House Republican leader Jim Durkin of Western Springs, a special House committee is investigating whether Madigan engaged in “conduct unbecoming to a legislator.” The committee heard testimony from an executive with ComEd parent Exelon this week, but Madigan and other witnesses have declined the invitation to testify.

Madigan has been speaker since 1983, with the exception of two years in the 1990s when Republicans took control of the House. House Democrats have been nearly unanimous in voting for him to remain speaker, with only a few dissents. Most recently, Rep. Anne Stava-Murray of Naperville voted “present” in 2019, as did then-Rep. Scott Drury of Highwood in 2017.

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