Mary Cavanagh For State House

Mary Cavanagh, a Redford resident is running for State House District 10.

Age: 29
Party affiliation: Democratic Party
Family:I am the grand-daughter of the former Mayor of Detroit back in the 60s, Mayor Jerome Cavanagh. I am the cousin of current Supreme Court Justice Megan Cavanagh, as well as, the daughter of former Wayne County Commissioner and Michigan State Representative Phil Cavanagh.
Occupation:Director of Project Development for New Start Construction Company, 5 years
Previous elected experience:I was previously elected as Precinct Delegate for my hometown, Redford Township
Family members in government:Yes, my mom is the current Treasurer of Redford Township and I have an Uncle on the Circuit Court and the Appeals Court.
Campaign website: http://www.MaryforMichigan.com

The single most pressing issue facing our state is _______, and this is what I intend to do about it.
COVID is the most pressing issue facing our state today. I will bring much-needed resources and the basic necessities of housing, air quality, clean water, and affordable healthcare to the residents of Michigan. I will begin to ensure a healthy workforce through rapid testing and contact training, fight for instant small business relief, unemployment expansion, raised minimum wage, and create a district-wide plan that brings new businesses to my district while working with current businesses owners to open their doors safely with PPE equipment and customer health accountability. I will fight for our children to stay safe while being educated by redirecting funding from for-profit schools, demand higher state allocations and fight for the latest learning tools-from Internet and laptops to ongoing social and emotional support for students, teachers, and families.

What are the critical differences between you and the other candidates seeking this post?
The other candidate is a Republican candidate. Although I would like to compare her actual stance on issues such as healthcare, affordable housing, equality for all, social justice reform, Earned Income Tax Credit, and making more resources available to hard working families, due to her inaccessibility of information, I am unable to. With no website, mailers, questionnaires, or information on her position or what she would like to do for District 10 (and Michigan), it is hard to compare the critical differences at all. I do know I have been deeply involved in public service and social activism for over 19 years in both my community and all of Wayne County, from serving with the AmeriCorps in Detroit public schools, being a direct-care provider for developmentally disabled persons, to developing projects with Mental Health Facilities, non-profits, and a construction company to revitalize communities, create jail diversion programs, offer vocational trainings, and affordable housing opportunities. I am currently an AFL-CIO advocate, an Executive Board Member for the Michigan Women’s Democratic Caucus, and a life-long member of the Michigan Democratic Party and well as the Redford Democratic Party since I was elected Precinct Delegate in 2016.

What accomplishments in your past would you cite as evidence you can handle this job?
While working in AmeriCorps,

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Assam CM directs state officials to ensure tea garden workers receive bonuses before Durga Puja

Guwahati (Assam) [India], October 13 (ANI): Assam Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal on Tuesday in a meeting with District Collectors (DCs), and Superintendents of Police (SPs) via video conferencing in Guwahati directed the officials to ensure tea garden workers receive bonuses at the fixed rate before Durga Puja.

In a series of tweets, the Chief Minister’s office informed that Sonowal also reviewed the preparations for giving ‘land pattas’ to 1 lakh landless indigenous families by December 2020.

“Chief Minister Sarbananda Sonowal reviewed the progress of various schemes in a meeting with DCs and SPs via video conferencing in Guwahati. Inter alia, preparations for giving land pattas to 1 lakh landless indigenous families by December this year was deliberated in the meeting,” the CMO tweeted.

“The Chief Minister directed officials to ensure tea garden workers receive bonuses at the fixed rate before Durga Puja and ensure that all eligible beneficiaries avail benefits of schemes like Arundhati and Orunodoi,” it said in another tweet.

Sonowal further directed the officials to give special attention to law and order situation during Durga Puja and asked them to take steps to cooperate with the public during the festival.

“Reviewing law & order situation in the districts, the CM directed officials to give special attention to the same during Durga Puja festivities. The CM directed officials to take steps to cooperate with the public in observance of Durga Puja rituals and create awareness about following #COVID19 protocols,” CMO said.

CMO added that the Chief Minister further directed the officials to take necessary steps to expedite the issuance of Aadhaar card in all districts of the state.

The week-long festivities for Durga Puja will begin from October 22. (ANI)

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State Rep. Brian Elder faces Republican Timothy Beson for 96th House seat in Bay County

BAY CITY, MI – Voters in Michigan’s 96th House District in Bay County will decide the race between incumbent state Rep. Brian Elder and Republican challenger Timothy Beson.

The 96th District covers areas in central and southern Bay County such as Bangor Township, the cities of Bay City and Essexville, Bangor, Hampton, Frankenlust, Merrit, Monitor, Portsmouth and Kawkawlin Townships.

Elder holds a law degree from the UCLA School of Law, according to Vote 411. Elder is Democratic vice chair of the House Agriculture Committee and is a member of the Judiciary Committee. He is chair and co-founder of the Michigan Legislative Labor Caucus.

According to Beson’s campaign website, he is a lifelong resident of Bay County and the owner of Beson’s Market. He holds a degree in business management from Saginaw Valley State University and is serving as a school board member for Bangor Township Schools.

Beson won the right to face Elder after coming out ahead of two other Republican candidates – Allen Bauer and Martin Blank – during the August primary election.

MLive Media Group has partnered with the League of Women Voters of Michigan to provide candidate information and other voting resources to readers ahead of 2020 elections on Vote411.

Each candidate was given a list of questions relevant to the office for which they are campaigning. The voter guide can be accessed at vote411.org.

Beson did not respond to requests for comment by MLive about his candidacy and did not answer the Vote411 questions. According to his website, Beson’s campaign focuses on standing for parents and teachers in regards to a safe return to in-person instruction, supporting law enforcement and expanding skilled trades programs.

Here are the Vote411 responses given by Elder:

What is your position on the role of public funding of education in Michigan? What measures do you support/propose to improve educational outcomes and accessibility for all Michigan students?

Elder: The purpose of public education in the State of Michigan is create citizens who are knowledgeable about their form of government, understand math, science, literature and the arts, and are prepared to live as functioning adults. Preparing our students for their future careers is important, but so is making sure that we have citizens that can think critically and help our democracy thrive. We, as citizens, pay for such a system through our taxes, but we have shifted the tax burden away from the wealthiest and largest corporations onto the backs of average citizens. That is wrong.

What policies do you support to increase jobs and help Michigan residents improve their economic positions, in general and given the pandemic?

Elder: As a two-term State Representative, I have consistently voted for and sponsored legislation to help businesses compete and create jobs. With appropriate benchmarks, like increasing actual payroll and requiring that local dollars be used for local companies when possible, we can and should help to grow our economy here in Michigan. In addition, I have consistently supported policies like Prevailing Wage that ensure that

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Ohio House Bill 6 scandal inspires more questionable attacks in state legislative races

COLUMBUS, Ohio – A Republican-controlled legislature passed Ohio House Bill 6, the nuclear bailout law that’s now at the center of a federal corruption investigation, and a Republican governor signed it.

But some Democrats played supporting roles in the bill becoming law, too, while some Republicans aggressively opposed it.

Don’t expect any of that nuance to be captured in political attacks that are swirling in hotly contested state legislative races.

One audacious ad from the Ohio Republican Party attacks Alexis Miller, the Democratic nominee for House District 89 in Northern Ohio.

The ad attempts to tie Miller, a first-time candidate, to the HB6 scandal by noting – accurately – that House Democrats provided the votes for state Rep. Larry Householder to be elected speaker. Householder and four allies, including a former Ohio Republican Party chairman, were arrested in July for allegedly using more than $60 million in bribe money from FirstEnergy Corp. to secure the passage of the law, which gives a former subsidiary $1.3 billion in ratepayer money to support two nuclear power plants.

“If Alexis Miller’s campaign is supported by the same people who supported Larry Householder, how can we trust her?” the mailer asks.

What the ad doesn’t mention is that Miller’s GOP opponent, state Rep. D.J. Swearingen, was appointed to the legislature by Householder, a Republican. Swearingen also received donations from FirstEnergy, ex-FirstEnergy lobbyist Juan Cespedes, who was among those arrested, and the House GOP campaign committee, which was financially supported by Householder’s operation.

Another mailer from the Ohio Democratic Party ties state Rep. Dave Greenspan, a Westlake Republican, to the HB6 scandal. Greenspan, first elected in 2016, is running against Monique Smith, a Democrat and former Lakewood city councilwoman.

The ad, which references the federal investigation as the “largest bribery and money laundering scheme ever in Ohio, is a boilerplate attack Democrats are waging against Republicans across the state. It might give a voter the impression that Greenspan voted for the bill.

But Greenspan didn’t just vote against House Bill 6, he’s sponsored two separate bills to repeal it, and even went to the FBI, aiding the federal investigation against Householder while the bill was still being debated, court records show. His refusal to vote for it led Householder to ominously threaten him in a text message that made its way into an affidavit from an FBI agent laying out the case against Householder and his allies.

The common thread between Greenspan and Swearingen: both are Republicans holding seats that are expected to be competitive in this November’s election. Greenspan represents a district that includes Cleveland’s western suburbs that could be a top pickup opportunity for Democrats, while Swearingen represents Erie and Ottawa counties, a potential swing area– and as a recent political appointee, his name has never appeared on a ballot.

It’s not just the Greenspan/Smith and Miller/Swearingen races. The HB6 scandal has inspired numerous questionable attacks, as Democrats try to take advantage of a corruption scandal, even by attacking first-time candidates who

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Emily Bauman For State House

Emily Bauman, a Westland resident is running for State House District 16.

Age: 53
Party affiliation: Republican Party
Family:Bill, husband and 3 children, 20, 12, 9
Occupation:Business & Life Coach & business owner, 7 years. Previously, owner of landscape design firm and sales & management positions in various industries: telecommunications, medical, dental, & retail.
Previous elected experience:Though I have not held an office, I served as campaign manager on a Congressional campaign
Family members in government:My brother is a police officer in Texas and retired from the Air Force. My father was a 1st Lieutenant in the US Army.
Campaign website: https://www.emilybauman.com/

The single most pressing issue facing our state is _______, and this is what I intend to do about it.
The single most pressing issue for our state is rebuilding the economy, while not sacrificing health. Both can be and need to be rebuilt, quickly. I intend take active engagement in open discussion and negotiations that will support ways for businesses to reopen safely. I will also support the constitutional rights of the people of Michigan and trust that they will make the best decisions for themselves and their families and their community–I will support them by helping provide the education needed for them to make healthy and safe decisions.

What are the critical differences between you and the other candidates seeking this post?
The critical differences are that the people I will serve can trust that I will do what I say I will do and I am a person who takes action. An elected office is a privilege and the State Representative office a 2-year job, not a seat to take up and collect taxpayer money. I understand business, having been a business owner for nearly 20 years, and I understand having much and having little. I understand what it takes to raise a family and make the sacrifices needed for others before myself. I believe to serve the people you must be able to relate and I have life experiences and relationships that will provide me a grounding as well as an understanding that you can only have through years. As a State Representative, I will work for the people of my district and the state of Michigan from day 1, and not only when it is time for re-election.

What accomplishments in your past would you cite as evidence you can handle this job?
The main accomplishments are that of being a business owner, mother and wife of 24 years. I have also worked in corporate America and many various industries, giving me an understanding and perspective you can’t have without the experiences. I understand the value of hard work and even working harder and feeling like you are gaining little and then pushing and persevering through anyway. Plus, my work and accomplishments with nonprofits in fundraising, strategic planning and board governance sets me apart and is a great precursor to serving people in an elected office.

What

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Alex Garza For State House

Alex Garza, a Taylor resident is running for State House District 12.

Age: 26
Party affiliation: Democratic Party
Family:Wife – Amira Garza
Occupation:State Representative (2019 – present)
Previous elected experience:Taylor City Council Chairman (2013 – 2019)
Family members in government:Yes, one of my sisters work in politics.
Campaign website: https://www.alexformichigan.com

The single most pressing issue facing our state is _______, and this is what I intend to do about it.
Health care and Prescription Drug Costs. I am a co-sponsor of legislation that would cap prescription drug costs in Michigan. We must continue to fight against high drug costs and limit the strain it puts on our citizens. In order to cover Michiganders to the fullest extent possible, we must prioritize our community health for this to become a reality. Everyone should have access to affordable health care in our state.

What are the critical differences between you and the other candidates seeking this post?
I am the only candidate in this race that has put together an actual campaign. Unfortunately my Republican opponent has not given the voters an opportunity to know where she stands on issues or even to know that she is an actual candidate in the 12th District. I could not speak on our differences because I do not know what she stands for. I will say however, the difference is that I respect the voters’ right to be informed about who is running to represent them in the legislature. I am proud of the positive campaign my team and I have run to inform the voters of my district.

What accomplishments in your past would you cite as evidence you can handle this job?
I have passed 5 bi-partisan bills during my first term as a State Representative. Making me a leader working on both sides of the aisle in the Michigan House of Representatives. This proves that I am an effective legislator that will deliver results. I will work with anyone, Republican or Democrat, that want to help me improve the lives of those I represent in Taylor, Romulus, and Van Buren Twp.

What steps should state government take to bolster economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic for local businesses?
During this period of COVID-19, the issues of our District have never been more apparent. Our immediate need is to continue to slow the spread of the Coronavirus and ensure our communities have the resources they need to respond to this pandemic. I am proud to have supported legislation that helped our small businesses access grants to help in their recovery. As I seek to return to Lansing, I will continue to be a strong advocate for supporting out local businesses rebuilding from this pandemic.

How will you address the calls for racial justice and police reform?
We are at a boiling point in this country. We have seen so many racial injustices happen before our very eyes across this nation. Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, the

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Ohio State student killed in shooting near frat house; suspect arrested

A teen has been arrested in the shooting death early Sunday of an Ohio State University student after an altercation outside an off-campus frat house, according to reports.

Columbus police said they found the victim Chase Meola, 23, in an alley next to the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house.

Officers responded shortly after 2 a.m. for a report of shooting.

OHIO STATE PLAYER OUT OF HOSPITAL AFTER WEEKEND SHOOTING

Mug shot for Kinte Mitchell, 18.

Mug shot for Kinte Mitchell, 18.
(Franklin County Sheriff’s Office)

Police said Kinte Mitchell Jr., 18, was arrested a few blocks away and charged with killing Meola, The Columbus Dispatch reported.

“Reports indicate that individuals were asked to leave a house party in the area, and an altercation occurred outside,” they said.

Police said Mitchell was not a Ohio State student and they were trying to determine how he wound up at the party.

ILLINOIS COLLEGE SHOOTING SUSPECT SURRENDERS IN CHICAGO, SCHOOL SAYS

Phi Kappa Psi had its student organization status revoked in June 2018 and is on disciplinary suspension through August 2022 due to hazing and endangering behavior, according to The Lantern, the Ohio State student newspaper.

“The Ohio State University community is in mourning, and our deepest condolences and support go to the family and friends of Chase,” campus police said in a statement.

Meola was a fifth-year marketing major from Mahwah, N.J.

He was a high school football standout who aspired to work on Wall Street, the Newark Star-Ledger reported.

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“Wall Street is where I would like to see my self in the near future,” he said on LinkedIn, according to the paper. “Ohio State was a great place for me learn and perfect all my skills.”

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Economy, COVID dominate state House debate in Greenwich

GREENWICH — With a crowded slate of six candidates — who all practiced social distancing — the three races for the state House of Representatives in Greenwich were all combined into one debate Thursday night.

The League of Women Voters of Greenwich hosted the debate at Town Hall and streamed it via Zoom.

The match-ups saw Republican Kimberly Fiorello and Democrat Kathleen Stowe face off in the 149th District, which includes part of Stamford; incumbent Democrat Stephen Meskers and Republican challenger Joe Kelly in the 150th District; and incumbent Republican Harry Arora and Democratic challenger Hector Arzeno in the 151st District.

Under the format, the six candidates were part of the same debate. Issues like the economy, transportation and recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic dominated as they were asked the same questions.

All had time for reply but the format did not allow for much back and forth dialogue between the opponents. But on the topic of small business in the state, the candidates were in big agreement.

Stowe, vice chair of the Greenwich Board of Education, said she could speak personally about the opportunity for Connecticut as New Yorkers relocate here during the pandemic. She said the goal should be to persuade the new residents to stay — and to get businesses to move to Connecticut, too. Stowe, who has a background in investment banking and private equity, runs a financial technology company with her father. She said they were planning on leaving New York and possibly relocating their business to Connecticut.

“Once people see how wonderful Connecticut is they’ll want to stay here,” she said. “Businesses always come and they stay where they’re welcomed. … As a state, we should be recruiting companies just like mine. We have the key ingredients, but we need to enhance it with an economic development effort and streamlining bureaucracy and red tape. And we need to expand our state venture capital effort.”

Fiorello, a member of Greenwich’s Representative Town Meeting, said not enough is done to grow businesses in the state and said that Connecticut is one of the most business-unfriendly states in the country due to laws and taxes.

“This needs to change and the change really comes from not doing more of the same,” Fiorello said. “I pledge to be a voice for the small businesses.”

Doing that, Fiorello said, would convince renters in Connecticut to become home buyers.

Kelly, who is also a member of the Board of Education, said that in the more than 20 years he has owned small businesses in Connecticut, the state has never reached out to him about how it could help.

“I pay my taxes, I pay my fees,” he said. “I think last month I employed about 35 or 40 people. Basically, I got no help from the state at all. I love Connecticut. I love Greenwich. I want to stay here. I could take my businesses anywhere, but I love it here. We have to change that it’s not comfortable for

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Washington state garden offers useful inspiration for Sonoma County front yards

For Sandra, a “hands-on” person, it was tough to stay out of the way as a contractor and workmen gutted and completely renovated the 1950s house she and her husband, Howard, had just bought in Walla Walla, Washington.

New to the area, Sandra was keen to get to know the neighborhood. So while the men upgraded her new home to a more modern aesthetic and condition, she turned to the front garden. Each day, from a rental house a few blocks away, Sandra would come over and labor in the garden in an effort to make progress on the house and to begin to meet her neighbors.

The garden was not a garden when she started. Her first efforts were directed at a steep bank along the sidewalk, a discouraging mass of rocks knit together by a dense mat of Bermuda grass. She progressed incrementally, each day removing a few more rocks and clearing a little more area.

On the strip of land between the sidewalk and street, sheltered under an old weeping cherry tree, Sandra placed a cheerful red rustic table and chairs saved from her garden at her previous house, in Seattle. She used river-washed natural gravel to cover the soil. A big water dish for dogs and a beautifully planted pot on the table, a garden in miniature, were the finishing touches. In effect, she created a street-side living room, a place to sit and visit. The tables and chairs had provided the same function at her former home, and many conversations, cups of coffee and glasses of wine had passed over its brightly colored surface.

The steep bank took shape with plants Sandra brought from her Seattle garden, chiefly low-growing succulents like groundcover sedums, low-growing grasses like fescues and American millet grass milium effusum ‘Aureum’ — all sparely punctuated with yuccas.

“I’m not a professional gardener, but I know what I like,” Sandra said. She wanted a low-maintenance, drought-tolerant garden with a modern aesthetic that would correspond with that of the house. As the plants grew and spread, she pulled off small pieces of the sedums and planted them around the yard to limit the number of plant species used and the number of others she’d need to buy. The garden is densely planted and the succulents now merge into a solid carpet.

In the winter, the pattern made by the low-growing succulents, gray fescues, golden grasses, lamb’s ears, coral bells and gray yucca is like a soft and vibrant Persian carpet draped over the bank, with the bright and soft greens and gray and yellow hues repeating in a tapestry of color. In early summer the succulents bloom and the bank turns into a miniature meadow of little white and yellow flowers, heavily visited by tiny native bees.

The strip between the sidewalk and street, a very difficult place to garden, has been turned into a gravel garden. Sandra used the same grey-white washed rocks as under the table and chairs to cover the ground,

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Sweet Treats: Desserts & Delicacies from the Garden State

This post was contributed by a community member. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

Just in time for Thanksgiving join the Woodbridge Public Library November 10 at 7PM to explore a variety of “sweet” culinary traditions from the 18th and 19th centuries. We will delve into how the treats we enjoy have changed and we will discuss the process and ingredients of making these food items then and now to give us some perspective!

Presented by Hilary May of Museum of Early Trades and Crafts in Madison, NJ.

Registration is required. Please register @https://bit.ly/3dbCGKO.

On the day before the program you will be sent the Zoom meeting information by email. Please note that if you are using Zoom on a tablet or smartphone you will need to download the Zoom app.

The views expressed in this post are the author’s own. Want to post on Patch?

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