Plant bulbs now in Western Washington to enjoy spring blooms

This is a great week to purchase bulbs at the local nursery is as soon as you see them for sale, and add spring flowering bulbs to your landscape.

Western Washington has the perfect climate for growing tulips, daffodils, crocus and other spring bloomers as our mild winters and early springs are similar to what they experience in Holland, considered the bulb growing capital of the world.

The year of 2020 may be remembered for many negative things, but this month may be your chance to change the cycle of loss and lamenting and make 2020 the year you added hundreds of spring flowering bulbs that will perennialize and return for years in defiance of the darkness that was COVID-19.

This fall I will be adding more “Angelique” tulips to my front garden as this double pink variety looks like a peony but with a shorter stem that won’t flop over in the rain. I also will add more of the orb-shaped blue blooms of the flowering onion or alliums. The Allium “Globemaster” has huge blooms on stems up to 3 feet tall, and as members of the onion family this showstopper is naturally pest resistant.

Best bulb planting questions

Q. I have planted bulbs in the past and they have never bloomed. I know that down below the ground mice gnaw on my tulips, then if a few survive and get ready to bloom the deer move in to chomp off the buds! I am done with tulips. Are there any pest resistant bulbs?

A. Daffodils to the rescue! Mice and deer will not destroy daffodil bulbs underground or daffodil blooms above ground, so this is the good-to-go bulb for spring color in areas where deer roam free. You will need to protect daffodils from slugs and snails once the new shoots emerge in the spring. Like all bulbs, they need well-drained soil so they don’t rot in the winter rains.

Q. My soil is rock hard and full of rocks. It is difficult to dig holes for bulbs. Any suggestions for a lazy gardener?

A. I have two ideas for “no dig” bulb planting. The first is to scratch the soil, set the bulbs on top then cover the bulbs with 6-8 inches of topsoil. If you don’t want to have topsoil delivered to your home (deliveries are usually at least 10 yards, a huge amount that can be used on lawns as well as beds) you can purchase garden soil or raised bed soil in bags at home center stores or nurseries. Just open the bag of soil and pour it on top of the bulbs. Cover with a wood chip mulch to keep the mound of soil in place.

Q. How deep should I plant my bulbs? I have crocus, daffodils, tulips and hyacinths to plant.

A. The general rule of green thumb is to plant bulbs two to three times as deep as the height of the bulb. If you have squirrels, plant your bulbs

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Color your spring with fall bulbs

Carole McCray
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If you have, over the years, looked at gardens where there is a profusion of color with spring-flowering bulbs and wished for the same showstopping display in your garden, then now is the time to think about planting spring-flowering bulbs.

I had been remiss some years and did not plant certain bulbs or as many as I should have, and then came spring, and I had regrets. So, this fall, make time for spring color in your garden and plant fall bulbs in the perennial bed and beneath trees and shrubs. If space is a problem, fall bulbs can be planted in pots, containers and window boxes, and even be forced to bloom indoors.

Not all bulbs are the same. That is, some fall bulbs work as perennials, others are considered annuals. Daffodils and scilla are reliable as perennials. Tulips and hyacinths have become annuals for me. The National Garden Bureau suggests treating them as annuals, and to check bloom times so you can enjoy a long season of flowers. Since tulips and hyacinths often bloom as annuals, the National Garden Bureau suggests experimenting with new color combinations every year.

Some of their tips for planting spring-flowering bulbs:

• The best times for planting are mid-October through mid-November. Early December is the latest for planting. Plant bulbs about three weeks before the soil begins to freeze.

• Well-drained soil and about six to eight hours of sun are the ideal locations for bulbs.

• Your selection of bulbs should include bulbs with different bloom times. Early-, mid- and late-season-blooming bulbs will guarantee a colorful spring show of flowering bulbs.

Carole McCray resides in Cape May, New Jersey and is an award-winning garden writer who has been writing a monthly garden column, The Potting Shed, for regional newspapers for nearly 20 years. Her articles have been published in The Christian Science Monitor Newspaper, Coastal Living Magazine, Cape May Magazine, Growise Garden Guide and Ideals Magazine. She won the Garden Writer’s Association Award for newspaper writing for The Christian Science Monitor Newspaper.

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In the Garden column: Color your spring with fall bulbs – Lifestyle – The Topeka Capital-Journal

If you have, over the years, looked at gardens where there is a profusion of color with spring-flowering bulbs and wished for the same showstopping display in your garden, then now is the time to think about planting spring-flowering bulbs.

I had been remiss some years and did not plant certain bulbs or as many as I should have, and then came spring, and I had regrets. So, this fall, make time for spring color in your garden and plant fall bulbs in the perennial bed and beneath trees and shrubs. If space is a problem, fall bulbs can be planted in pots, containers and window boxes, and even be forced to bloom indoors.

Not all bulbs are the same. That is, some fall bulbs work as perennials, others are considered annuals. Daffodils and scilla are reliable as perennials. Tulips and hyacinths have become annuals for me. The National Garden Bureau suggests treating them as annuals, and to check bloom times so you can enjoy a long season of flowers. Since tulips and hyacinths often bloom as annuals, the National Garden Bureau suggests experimenting with new color combinations every year.

Some of their tips for planting spring-flowering bulbs:
• The best times for planting are mid-October through mid-November. Early December is the latest for planting. Plant bulbs about three weeks before the soil begins to freeze.
• Well-drained soil and about six to eight hours of sun are the ideal locations for bulbs.
• Your selection of bulbs should include bulbs with different bloom times. Early-, mid- and late-season-blooming bulbs will guarantee a colorful spring show of flowering bulbs.
Carole McCray resides in Cape May, New Jersey and is an award-winning garden writer who has been writing a monthly garden column, The Potting Shed, for regional newspapers for nearly 20 years. Her articles have been published in The Christian Science Monitor Newspaper, Coastal Living Magazine, Cape May Magazine, Growise Garden Guide and Ideals Magazine. She won the Garden Writer’s Association Award for newspaper writing for The Christian Science Monitor Newspaper.

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Work Now For A Flourishing Garden Next Spring

The Daily Beast

The Kid Who Masterminded El Chapo’s Secret Phone Network

It came in off the street one day—a tip, a lead, a rumor—whatever you cared to call it, it was one of the strangest things they had heard in their careers. Chapo Guzmán, the world-famous drug lord, had hired a young IT guy and the kid had built him a sophisticated system of high-end cell phones and secret servers, all of it ingeniously encrypted.The unconfirmed report—perhaps that was the best way to describe it—had arrived that Friday in June 2009 when a tipster walked into the lobby of the FBI’s field division office in New York. After his story had been vetted downstairs, it made its way up seven flights of stairs and landed with a curious thud among the crowded cubicles of C-23, the Latin American drug squad. For more than thirty years, the elite team of agents and their bosses had hunted some of the drug trade’s biggest criminals, and while tall tales of their antics circulated constantly through its squad room near the courts in Lower Manhattan, no one in the unit knew what to make of this one. The tipster’s account seemed credible enough, but it was sorely lacking details: The only facts he had offered on the young technician were a first name—Christian—and that he was from Medellín, Colombia. All sorts of kooks spouting all sorts of nonsense showed up all the time at FBI facilities, claiming they had inside information on the Kennedy killing or knew someone who knew someone who knew where Jimmy Hoffa was. In what were still the early days of internet telephony, it seemed a bit far-fetched that a twentysomething hacker had reached a deal with the world’s most wanted fugitive and furnished him in hiding with a private form of Skype. As alluring as it sounded, it was just the sort of thing that would probably turn out to be a myth.Inside Colombia’s ‘Air Chapo’ Cocaine Shipping ScandalIn the middle of a drug war, chasing myths was not enough to send C-23 into the field: reality was keeping the unit busy on its own. Three years after Mexico had launched a crusade against its brutal cartel kingpins, the country had erupted into incomparable violence, and much of the chaos had rolled downhill into American investigative files. Just that winter, a psychopath who called himself the Stewmaker had been caught near Tijuana after having boiled three hundred bodies down to renderings in caustic vats of acid. Two weeks later, a retired Mexican general was murdered in Cancún, his kneecaps shattered, and his corpse propped up behind the steering wheel of a pickup truck abandoned on a highway. Since late 2006, the country’s seven drug clans had all been at war with one another or the government—or sometimes both at once—and ten thousand people had already lost their lives.C-23 and other U.S .law enforcement agencies pitched in when they could, opening cases and offering intelligence to their counterparts in

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Through careful planning, Iowa City woman’s garden blooms from early spring to late fall

By Dorothy de Souza Guedes, correspondent

A  towering hydrangea nearly a dozen years old stands tall at the corner of Janis and Rip Russell’s front porch; lime green spring blooms turned a warm, rosy mauve late in summer.

It is surprisingly quiet for a home near the residential heart of Iowa City except for occasional shrieks and chatter from Dickens, a large cockatoo. He’s holding court inside the house, waiting for Janis — she’s his person — to take him upstairs for the evening.

Dozens of identical, side-by-side perennial grass plants soften the chain-link fence along the Russells’ driveway. It’s a short walk around back to the patio that opens up to the surprise of a glorious urban oasis.

The back garden is brilliant with color in early September, even though Janis doesn’t plant anything special for fall. Three- and 4-foot annuals such as sturdy zinnias, plumes of celosia and climbing petunia complement perennial globes of gomphrena and spikes of salvia and veronica that bloom well into fall.

Janis plans for constantly blooming beauty and cut bouquets rather than food.

“It’s kind of like being a conductor of an orchestra,” she said.

The music begins as tulips, daffodils and grape hyacinth poke through sun-warmed soil and happily announce that spring has arrived. Those early blooms quietly give way to bushy, fragrant peonies. Then the first of the 40 varieties of climbing clematis vines — the clay soil is perfect for clematis — begin to flower, late-blooming daffodils, too.

The first flush of roses burst into color and fragrance as peonies begin to fade and other varieties of clematis climb high, then bloom. Soon the glorious scent of Asiatic lilies wafts through the garden, the flowers lasting for two weeks on their sturdy stalks even when cut for bouquets.

A chorus of 200 daylilies begins as roses continue to bloom in the background. As those flowers fade, annuals strategically placed to cover flowerless foliage grow to their full height and burst into color that lasts for months.

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The seasons-long color begins with weeks of fall planning, wildly scribbled notes filling page after page in Janis’ garden notebook.

Planning a Garden

Throughout the spring and summer, Janis had noted what bloomed when and how well the plants grew and bloomed.

“I want to remember all of this come next spring. That’s why I write it down,” Russell said.

She looks at the colors and decides what she wants to change for the following year. For example, her tentative plan for 2021 includes less yellow near the patio due to “overachieving” plants. She hasn’t decided what to plant in their place.

She’ll probably rearrange the zinnia area behind the garage and find a new orange seed. She bought zinnia seeds from a new company, and the color, although pretty, wasn’t true to the label.

“When I plan any colors, I want my color there,” she said.

Sometimes, she’ll cut a bouquet and walk around the yard, eyeballing it, deciding

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Garden grows: Panthers spring up in class, and so do hopes | High School

SPRING GARDEN — Luke Welsh spent a chilly December day trying to wrap his mind around news.

Not that news. COVID-19 hadn’t become a thing in the United States by December of 2019. George Floyd hadn’t happened.

The unfathomable news that preoccupied Welsh’s mind Dec. 17? Just in time for his senior year as Spring Garden’s running back, just as the Panthers had gained footing in Class 1A, the Alabama High School Athletic Association announced the next reclassification cycle.

Spring Garden would bump up to 2A for the first time in school history, and Welsh couldn’t believe it.

“I thought it was bullcrap, because I just didn’t understand,” he said. “We have a general store and no red lights. There’s, like, 35 or 40 people in each of our classes, and I was just confused how we’d be a 2A.”

Turns out, it was no ominous sign of things to come in 2020. Not, at least, for Spring Garden’s football team.

Spring Garden football

Starting QB Ryley Kirk passes the ball during Spring Garden football practice. Photo by Stephen Gross / The Anniston Star




The Panthers enter their midseason non-region game at 3A Hokes Bluff at 4-0, including a COVID-19 forfeit from Locust Fork. Spring Garden outscored the three opponents it played 150-14.

The Panthers beat Cherokee County rival Cedar Bluff for only the fourth time in 46 tries … 55-0.

In two 2A, Region 6 games, the Panthers beat West End-Walnut Grove 62-0 and Cleveland 33-14.

Spring Garden enters the Hokes Bluff game ranked No. 5 in 2A, matching their highest 1A ranking in 2019. The Panthers won their first two region titles and made their first two quarterfinal runs in 2018 and 2019.

They were never ranked in 2018.

Spring Garden was somewhat of a Johnny-come-lately in 1A. The Panthers made nine of their 11 playoff appearances under current head coach Jason Howard. They got their first playoff victory in 2008 and advanced past the second round for the first time in 2018.

So forgive Welsh for wondering how a small, rural school that’s made more hey in basketball than it ever had in football, the ultimate numbers game, could be 2A.

Others wondered the same.

“We had some tough times in 1A,” Welsh said. “We had to really work hard to get where we were the past couple of years.

“We jumped to 2A, which was a little unexpected. I think everybody saw that and didn’t really know what to think about us.”

Spring Garden’s 30-man roster still looks like a 1A roster in number, but all 11 starters on offense returned this season. Quarterback Ryley Kirk, Welsh and Weston Kirk at running back and wide receivers Cooper Austin and Chaz Pope helped the Panthers score 461 points, the third-highest total in school history, in 2019.

Turns out, their level translated a class higher.

“I thought we’d be competitive,” Howard said. “I feel like we’re in one of the tougher regions around.”

An Oct.

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Kitchen Garden: Blooming good fun in spring | The Canberra Times

whats-on, food-and-wine, susan parsons, kitchen garden

The spring equinox is a joyful time for gardeners. Our mystery photo of the first flowers of Floriade Reimagined and the last mouthful of fruit salad (Kitchen Garden, September 1) stumped readers. Floriade head gardener Andrew Forster knew it where it was as he helped plant that display with staff from the National Portrait Gallery. Deirdre Ward, of Campbell, first thought it was at The Lawns in Manuka, where rows of pansies and tulips are planted in the raised bed where a plane tree fell some months ago. She and husband Lionel had been eating at Typica, the cafe formerly known as ONA. Then they went to the National Portrait Gallery. Solved. In the Wards’ home garden bees are supping on the purple flowers of Hardenbergia. See the three ribbons of flowers at the NPG then swing in to the Pub Rock exhibition or at Floriade NightFeast on October 2 when Broadbean Catering is among two dozen venues celebrating food for Floriade Reimagined. Their exclusive event features pub rock food and music (bookings essential). Our Diggers Van Gogh’s Landscape sunflowers giveaway resulted in a haiku from Len Leason, of Griffith. A reader admired poppies and tulips outside the Peter Yorke Building (entry to John James Hospital). Walk to EQ Cafe and Bakehouse in Kent Street for a croissant with housemade strawberry jam or a lamington with a syringe filled with the jam. Pansies bloom outside the IGA on Giles Street in Kingston. After lunch at Pomegranate Restaurant nearby, order their special Turkish ice cream. Head chef and owner Erkin Esen says it contains the ingredient salep powder. It takes 1000 orchid roots to make 1kg salep consequently, Esen says, the orchids are endangered. Enjoy the treat while you can. At Kingston Foreshore a thousand poppies are fluttering in shades of orange, yellow and white in a breeze off the lake. Sit at tables in the sunshine with a takeaway healthy combo salad from Local Press Wholefoods, one block up Giles Street. They sell reusable cloth face masks. The three-layer cotton designs with fruit and avocados sold out quickly so you will have to email BigBiteEco, owned since 2017 by creative Australian designer Seonaidh. (Masks must not have gaps so add aluminium flashing or a pipe cleaner to the bit over the bridge of the nose if necessary. Gardeners should use a mask when working with compost, potting mix or perlite, and some mulches.) Floriade boxed plantings outside the National Library, the Yamba Drive emergency entry to the Canberra hospital, Gungahlin Place and Dickson Town Centre have a secret. Look into poppy plantings where the foliage of tulips awaits their turn to bloom. There are Floriade potted plantings in Bruce, Calwell and Woden and community Floriade plantings in other suburbs. At Hughes shops, near the outdoor eating area of Home Ground cafe (try their sweet potato and date slice), are pots with baby olive trees and tulips. A reader says children from Hughes Primary kindergarten

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Start Thinking About Your Spring Garden Now

The common practice of cleaning gardens in fall and planting them spring has more to do with psychology than sound horticultural practice.

Many common fall garden chores do not benefit plants. However, you can do a lot in the fall to prepare your garden for the best start in spring. For a more sustainable garden, try flipping the script on the fall “to-do” list.

Don’t Clean Up Until Spring

You might already know that there is no reason to put the vegetable garden to bed in the fall. But fall clean-up doesn’t really do your ornamental landscape any favors, either.

The tidy look of a cleaned-up garden may have aesthetic appeal, but it breaks nature’s cycles. The hollow stems of perennials that have died back and the leaf litter on the ground are both critical winter habitat for wild bees, butterflies, and other insects. All of these bugs, in turn, provide the food that keeps overwintering birds alive through the coldest part of winter.

Wait until after the last frost when new growth starts to emerge in spring before you clean up the garden and you’ll give natural communities a better chance of survival.

Do Plant Perennials

Everyone knows that peonies must be planted in the fall. But many people don’t realize that peonies aren’t different from other perennials, they are just less tolerant.

Nearly all woody plants and perennials do better when they are planted in the fall after temperatures begin to drop but before the first frost. The tops of plants will go dormant or even die back when frost hits. But the roots can continue to grow under the frostline all winter.

By the time the plant is ready to leaf out in spring, the root system is already established. Fall is also the time to plant garlic and spring-flowering bulbs.

Do Hardscaping Projects

Construction projects are messy, and let’s face it, contractors are not known for carefully avoiding damage to existing plants. If you plan on a new garden next year, whether in the ground or a raised bed, preparing the beds is best accomplished in fall.

By doing the work in the fall, you reduce the risk of damaging emerging plants and you might find it’s easier getting on contractors’ schedules. Also, if you build those raised beds or lay new pavers now, you’ll have more time for starting seeds in the spring.

Mulch and Protect

Mulching with an organic material like wood chips in late fall not only contributes to the habitat already partly established through leaf litter, it helps protect all those newly planted roots. Winter mulch should be applied after plants have gone dormant.

Depending on your local climate, you might still need to bring potted plants and tender perennials inside for the winter. And the old trip of wrapping plants in burlap or covering them in old sheets is still a good way to protect the tops of plants from storms and unusually low temperatures. But in many cases, especially in

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‘Please help,’ Spring Garden residents tell city leaders after quintuple shooting that killed 2 men

After Wednesday night’s quintuple shooting at Roberto Clemente Playground in Spring Garden, a woman e-mailed City Council President Darrell Clarke and the mayor. “I am writing yet again, less than a month since my last email, to beg for help,” she wrote. “The situation on and around Wallace St. is escalating. 55 shots fired tonight. In a children’s playground.”



a man standing next to a fence: The basketball courts at Roberto Clemente Playground are chained closed on Thursday morning at 18th and Wallace in Spring Garden section of Philadelphia, September 17, 2020. This was the scene of a Wednesday night quintuple shooting that killed two people.


© ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS
The basketball courts at Roberto Clemente Playground are chained closed on Thursday morning at 18th and Wallace in Spring Garden section of Philadelphia, September 17, 2020. This was the scene of a Wednesday night quintuple shooting that killed two people.

It was the eighth shooting in Spring Garden this year. Three weeks ago, the woman had e-mailed Clarke after another Wallace Street incident.

“The expectation is we should be able to walk our streets without being shot,” she said Thursday, on the condition her name not be used for fear of retribution.

Wednesday night’s shooting on the 1800 block of Wallace was “what we were trying to avoid,” she said. “But we’re here now.”

Her concerns have been echoed by other residents in Spring Garden, a neighborhood with both economic and racial diversity, with gentrifying areas and blocks of deep poverty.

Gun violence has been a problem across Philadelphia this year. There have been 323 homicides in the city as of Wednesday night, a 32% increase from the same period last year, and more than the year-end homicide counts for almost every year from 2009 through 2017, according to police statistics.

There have been 1,475 shootings in the city as of Wednesday, a figure that exceeds the total year-end number of shootings from the last five years. From 2015 to 2017, there were about 1,250 shootings each year. In 2018, there were 1,401 shootings and 1,463 last year.

Kenney, in an e-mailed statement Thursday, said the city is “devastated” by a violent year, and “our hearts go out to the families of everyone affected by last night’s shooting.”

“We will continue to do everything we can do,” Clarke said in an interview, but one factor is an ongoing problem — “the availability of illegal weapons.”

In Wednesday’s shooting at the park’s basketball court, police responded about 8:10 p.m. to numerous 911 calls about gunfire. Two men, ages 18 and 21, had been fatally shot.

Surveillance video showed three assailants opening fire on a group of about 15 people, Chief Inspector Scott Small said. Police found 55 spent shell casings from two separate caliber firearms, he said.

Officers found 21-year-old Khalid Henderson, of the 1600 block of Wallace Street, unresponsive on the court and carried him to a 9th District patrol car. Before they left for the hospital, medics arrived and pronounced him dead at 8:25 p.m. in the backseat.

Police said an 18-year-old man, with gunshot wounds to his torso, was pronounced dead about two hours later. He was identified as Jayden Lucas, of Oxford Circle.

Three other men, one 18 and two others

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Quadruple shooting on basketball court leaves 2 dead in Spring Garden: Police

An explosion of gunfire on the basketball court left two people dead and two others injured on Wednesday night in Philadelphia.

A game of hoops ends in a deadly cascade of gunfire at a basketball court in the Spring Garden of section of Philadelphia Wednesday night.

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It happened around 8:18 p.m. on the 1800 block of Wallace Street at the Roberto Clemente Park in the city’s Spring Garden section.

Dozens of people were in the park and on the basketball court when police say roughly 55 gunshots rang out.

According to police, two men, Khalid Henderson, 21, and Jayden Lucas, 18, both died in the shooting.

“We have video that shows three males enter the playground from Wallace Street and target the deceased male. (They) chased him around the playground and shot him multiple times to his torso,” said Deputy Commissioner Melvin Singleton of the Philadelphia Police Department.

An 18-year-old man and a 19-year-old man also suffered gunshot wounds. Both men are hospitalized at this time; one is listed in stable condition, the other is listed in critical condition.

Pete Leonard who lives right across from the park says, “I thought I heard fireworks going off and that’s not really uncommon in this area. So I walked outside and a guy was walking past me and was like, ‘Yeah four people just got shot.'”

Police say at this point they have one man in custody who was fleeing in a Lexus with a gun. Two additional suspects are still being sought at this time.

Anyone with any information is asked to call police at 215-686-TIPS.

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