‘Birthday Girl’ Desperate for the Bathroom Leads Police on High Speed Chase

When you gotta go, you gotta go. A woman in Enid, Oklahoma led police on a high speed chase on her 28th birthday, all because she really needed to get home in time to go to the bathroom.

Local outlet KFOR said that Emily Owings was pulled over for a pretty standard traffic stop: she wasn’t wearing her seatbelt. Unfortunately, the only ID she had on her was her medical marijuana card. When police searched for the driver, they found out that her driver’s license had been suspended. According to an Enid Police Department Facebook post, the whole ordeal began at about 9 a.m. Tuesday morning.

In police footage shared by KFOR, an officer informs Owings that her license is suspended. When she asks why, the officer says that he doesn’t know but was “waiting to see if [she] had warrants through Woods County.”

Owings tried to tell the officer exactly why she wanted to go so quickly. “I have to poop so bad,” she said. After the officer dismissed her need to go, she said that it was her birthday. “It’s my birthday,” she said. When the officer asked what she’d say, she reiterated, “It’s my f**king birthday, man.”

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In another clip, Owings starts crying and asking why he won’t let her go. The officer said it wasn’t possible, because her license was supended. “I’m sorry, I didn’t know,” she said. “I won’t drive no more, but can I please go home and go poop?”

KFOR reported that the woman did have a warrant out for her arrest in Woods County, allegedly for a fight with an officer. Upon telling her that officers were on their way to get her, she responded, “No, they’re not. F**k you guys,” and sped off.

In the police department Facebook post, it wrote that the chase took place at speeds topping 70 miles per hour in a 30 MPH speed zone.

After she was apprehended, the woman was seemingly still more concerned about her bowels than the fact that her charges were going to be upgraded. “Can I poop in your car, man?” She asked as the officers put her in the back of the car.

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Officers found a glass meth pipe with burnt residue during a search of Owings’ vehicle. The police said she was booked with “eluding, reckless driving, driving under suspension, no seat belt, no insurance and possession of drug paraphernalia.”

At the end of its Facebook post, the department said it knows that we all have bathroom emergencies, but it’s still not worth the risks that Owings took. “Everybody poops, we know, but that’s no reason to commit a felony and put in danger the lives of officers, other motorists and pedestrians in the area. Also, be sure to buckle up. Seat belts save lives,” the post said.

The Enid Police Department public information officer did not respond to Newsweek’s emailed request for comment.

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Interior Dept. seeks to expedite energy projects to speed COVID recovery -document

WASHINGTON, Sept 2 (Reuters) – The Interior Department sent a list of 50 major infrastructure projects, including 21 involving oil and gas drilling and mining, to the White House to be fast-tracked to “support economic recovery” from the ongoing COVID-19 emergency, according to a document obtained through a lawsuit by an environmental group.

A July 15 letter obtained by the Center for Biological Diversity, from Deputy Interior Secretary Katharine MacGregor to White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow, listed projects undergoing environmental review.

The list includes around 5,000 oil wells in Wyoming, liquefied natural gas projects in Alaska and Oregon and an offshore wind project in Massachusetts, as well as several mining, grazing and transmission projects.

The request came in response to an executive order signed by U.S. President Donald Trump on June 4 that gave federal agencies emergency powers to fast-track major energy and other infrastructure projects by overriding environmental permitting requirements.

Interior Department spokesman Conner Swanson confirmed the request: “The Trump Administration has taken significant steps to improve the federal government’s decision-making process, while also ensuring that the environmental consequences of proposed projects are thoughtfully analyzed.”

Trump, a vocal advocate of fossil fuels as president, has sought to roll back environmental regulations across all federal agencies and reduce state powers to block projects for environmental reasons.

Earlier this year, the Trump administration proposed to streamline the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), a bedrock environmental regulation that creates time consuming environmental reviews and public feedback requirements for major infrastructure projects.

In the letter, MacGregor also said the Interior Department is working on expanding the list of “categorical exclusions” for projects to exempt them from full NEPA reviews.

Brett Hartl, government affairs director of the Center for Biological Diversity, filed a lawsuit to obtain the documents after the group’s public records request was denied.

“Rushing to approve more climate-killing fossil fuel projects while ignoring environmental harms is wrong, and using COVID-19 as an excuse is despicable,” said Hartl. (Reporting by Valerie Volcovici; Editing by Steve Orlofsky)

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Interior Department seeks to expedite energy projects to speed COVID recovery: document

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Interior Department sent a list of 50 major infrastructure projects, including 21 involving oil and gas drilling and mining, to the White House to be fast-tracked to “support economic recovery” from the ongoing COVID-19 emergency, according to a document obtained through a lawsuit by an environmental group.

The U.S. Interior Department building is shown reflected in a pond in Washington, September 10, 2008. REUTERS/Jason Reed

A July 15 letter obtained by the Center for Biological Diversity, from Deputy Interior Secretary Katharine MacGregor to White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow, listed projects undergoing environmental review.

The list includes around 5,000 oil wells in Wyoming, liquefied natural gas projects in Alaska and Oregon and an offshore wind project in Massachusetts, as well as several mining, grazing and transmission projects.

The request came in response to an executive order signed by U.S. President Donald Trump on June 4 that gave federal agencies emergency powers to fast-track major energy and other infrastructure projects by overriding environmental permitting requirements.

Interior Department spokesman Conner Swanson confirmed the request: “The Trump Administration has taken significant steps to improve the federal government’s decision-making process, while also ensuring that the environmental consequences of proposed projects are thoughtfully analyzed.”

Trump, a vocal advocate of fossil fuels as president, has sought to roll back environmental regulations across all federal agencies and reduce state powers to block projects for environmental reasons.

Earlier this year, the Trump administration proposed to streamline the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), a bedrock environmental regulation that creates time consuming environmental reviews and public feedback requirements for major infrastructure projects.

In the letter, MacGregor also said the Interior Department is working on expanding the list of “categorical exclusions” for projects to exempt them from full NEPA reviews.

Brett Hartl, government affairs director of the Center for Biological Diversity, filed a lawsuit to obtain the documents after the group’s public records request was denied.

“Rushing to approve more climate-killing fossil fuel projects while ignoring environmental harms is wrong, and using COVID-19 as an excuse is despicable,” said Hartl.

Reporting by Valerie Volcovici; Editing by Steve Orlofsky

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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