The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society turned a Manayunk parking lot into an awesome Pop Up Beer Garden paradise

MANAYUNK (WPVI) — Travel just a half block off Main Street in Manayunk and you’ll find a lot filled with more than 22-hundred plants, many getting a second life after this year’s PHS Philadelphia Flower Show

It’s a space perfect for COVID-19 with 20,000 square feet of open space that can hold up to 150 socially-distanced people.

The cocktails use herbs from the garden and there’s a menu of bar food and a backdrop of urban grit.

The site holds a community garden, part of the PHS Harvest 2020 program to help feed families in need. Harvests are being donated to Manayunk’s Northlight Community Center. To volunteer in the garden, email Cristina Tessaro: [email protected]

PHS Pop Up Garden | Beer Garden Menu
106 Jamestown Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19127

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AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS LOOKS TO THE FUTURE OF DESIGN, INDUSTRY AND PROFESSION …

Washington, D.C., Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As all industries tackle the ongoing effects of COVID-19, the American Society of Interior Designers ( ASID ) has sought to understand the resiliency of the design industry and profession through times of uncertainty. The 2020 ASID Interior Design Resiliency Report has released the results from its first phase, conducted during the summer of 2020 in partnership with Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald to further investigate interior design resilience by examining the impact of the pandemic, the response from the interior design community and the changes necessary in design to move forward. 

“In their day-to-day work, design professionals are creative problem-solvers who constantly strive to provide a positive, impactful experience,” explains ASID Director, Research and Knowledge Management Susan Chung, Ph.D. “We hope that in addition to helping us understand the changes and challenges that face the industry, this Resiliency Report demonstrates the value of design and contributions design professionals can make to help lead us into a safer and healthier world.”

Prior to this study, ASID had been tracking the impact of COVID-19 on the interior design community through pulse surveys, finding signs of resilience among the industry and profession. The Resiliency Report takes a deeper dive by examining attributes of interior design professionals, their experiences during the pandemic and expected changes in the design of the built environment. The study not only identifies issues interior design businesses and professionals have faced during this major disruption, but also tracks changes implemented in the industry, tests the viability of industry-wide changes and showcases the value of design. The study will be conducted in multiple phases, with this being the first, to better understand long-term resilience.

When surveying designers and other industry respondents, the study focused on areas including impact, response, changes in design and ways to build health and exercise resilience in the profession. Key findings include:

IMPACT

Regardless of age, gender, status, location, firm or experience, everyone has been affected by COVID-19. All respondents reported some level of impact on at least one of the five areas: life in general, country/city, firm, interior design industry/business and interior design education. Although general concern due to the impact of COVID-19 eased somewhat since its peak (March-April 2020), the majority of the interior design community still expresses high concerns (as measured in July 2020).

Impact is perceived as a collective and shared experience, and it is interconnected with personal and professional lives. Respondents’ lives are multifaceted and intricately woven with the external and larger society, and their social well-being was lowest during this time of physical distancing. 73 percent reported experiencing burnout in some frequency, having a major impact on personal well-being. 

RESPONSE

The design industry made necessary changes and adjustments, specifically focused on working remotely, technology, infrastructure, resources and support. Focus group participants reported different degrees of preparedness, with some undergoing a seamless transition and others facing a longer adjustment. Designers also navigated transitioning clients to a virtual working relationship. 

Designers collaborated to

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AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS LOOKS TO THE FUTURE OF DESIGN, INDUSTRY AND PROFESSION IN NEW RESILIENCY REPORT

In Partnership with Design Leaders Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald, Research Demonstrates the Effects of COVID-19 on Design Professionals and Spaces

Reported Level of Impact
Reported Level of Impact
Reported Level of Impact
Reported Business Preparedness
Reported Business Preparedness
Reported Business Preparedness

Washington, D.C., Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As all industries tackle the ongoing effects of COVID-19, the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) has sought to understand the resiliency of the design industry and profession through times of uncertainty. The 2020 ASID Interior Design Resiliency Report has released the results from its first phase, conducted during the summer of 2020 in partnership with Cosentino, Benjamin Moore and Emerald to further investigate interior design resilience by examining the impact of the pandemic, the response from the interior design community and the changes necessary in design to move forward. 

“In their day-to-day work, design professionals are creative problem-solvers who constantly strive to provide a positive, impactful experience,” explains ASID Director, Research and Knowledge Management Susan Chung, Ph.D. “We hope that in addition to helping us understand the changes and challenges that face the industry, this Resiliency Report demonstrates the value of design and contributions design professionals can make to help lead us into a safer and healthier world.”

Prior to this study, ASID had been tracking the impact of COVID-19 on the interior design community through pulse surveys, finding signs of resilience among the industry and profession. The Resiliency Report takes a deeper dive by examining attributes of interior design professionals, their experiences during the pandemic and expected changes in the design of the built environment. The study not only identifies issues interior design businesses and professionals have faced during this major disruption, but also tracks changes implemented in the industry, tests the viability of industry-wide changes and showcases the value of design. The study will be conducted in multiple phases, with this being the first, to better understand long-term resilience.

When surveying designers and other industry respondents, the study focused on areas including impact, response, changes in design and ways to build health and exercise resilience in the profession. Key findings include:

IMPACT

Regardless of age, gender, status, location, firm or experience, everyone has been affected by COVID-19. All respondents reported some level of impact on at least one of the five areas: life in general, country/city, firm, interior design industry/business and interior design education. Although general concern due to the impact of COVID-19 eased somewhat since its peak (March-April 2020), the majority of the interior design community still expresses high concerns (as measured in July 2020).

Impact is perceived as a collective and shared experience, and it is interconnected with personal and professional lives. Respondents’ lives are multifaceted and intricately woven with the external and larger society, and their social well-being was lowest during this time of physical distancing. 73 percent reported experiencing burnout in some frequency, having a major impact on personal well-being. 

RESPONSE

The design industry made necessary changes and adjustments, specifically focused on working remotely, technology,

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Elmer historical society plans open house

The Greater Elmer Area Historical Society’s monthly open house from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 10, will feature a book signing by Ralph H. Thomas, local author of “WWII: 50 Objects That Helped Win the War.” Copies will be available for purchase.

The historical society also will be giving away copies of its most recent historical booklet, which spotlights military history and veterans from Elmer, Pittsgrove and Upper Pittsgrove. In the museum, an exhibit of artifacts relating to local military history will be on display.

The event will be held indoors and outdoors, with masks and social distancing required. No more than 12 people may be in the museum at a time, but a tent will set up outside. Anyone who feels ill or is particularly vulnerable is advised to stay home or call to arrange for curbside pickup.

Located at 117 Broad St. in Elmer, the museum is free and open to the public. In addition to exhibits, the museum includes a research library with historic photographs, books and other items relating to the history of Elmer, Upper Pittsgrove and Pittsgrove .For more information about this program and other upcoming events, please visit the society’s Facebook page, call 609-670-0407 or email [email protected]

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Thornton Burgess Society seeks beach plum donations to keep jam kitchen in operation – News – capecodtimes.com

Last season, Greenbriar Jam Kitchen received 500 pounds of donated beach plums to make 1,000 jars of jelly, which sold — and quickly sold out — at $14 a jar. “That $14,000 was essentially the jam kitchen’s budget for the year,” Ray Hebert, trustee chairman at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History, said.

This may be one of Cape Cod’s most unusual fundraisers.

To keep Sandwich’s 117-year-old Greenbriar Jam Kitchen operating, officials are asking supporters to plant a beach plum hedge in their yards this fall and donate the fruit when it shows up next year.

“We don’t need you to write a check; you can support the jam kitchen with donated fruit,” Ray Hebert, trustee chairman at the Cape Cod Museum of Natural History, said. The museum includes the Thornton Burgess Society in Sandwich, which is believed to be the oldest continuously operating jam kitchen in the country.

Greenbriar accepts other donated fruit, but for Cape Cod, beach plum jelly is the iconic sweet spot.

Looking a bit like cranberries but in a variety of hues from blue-purple to yellow, beach plums are a fruit that grows wild in the sandy soil of the windswept Eastern coast. Those lucky enough to come across a patch of the rare gems while hiking keep the location secret, and even those who grow a cultivated strain at home do so quietly so as not to tempt plum poachers.

“When they bring in the beach plums, they don’t even tell me the location,” Hebert said.

Last season, Greenbriar Jam Kitchen got 500 pounds of donated beach plums to make 1,000 jars of jelly, which sold — and quickly sold out — at $14 a jar. “That $14,000 was essentially the jam kitchen’s budget for the year,” Hebert said.

In addition to supporting Greenbriar, a beach plum hedge could help your yard and the Cape’s environment.

“People always ask me ‘What can I do?’ There is good scientific evidence for the importance of native trees, shrubs and wildflowers,” Chris Neill, Ph.D., climate scientist at Woods Hole Research Center, said in an interview about a Native Plants Study released in the spring.

A wide variety of yards in six cities, including Boston, were studied. One of the key findings was that native plants (such as beach plums for the Cape) drew bees for pollination, triggering a chain reaction toward an ecosystem that is specifically local.

“The fact these things are native makes a real difference in attracting insects and feeding birds,” Neill said.

Incorporating native plants also cuts down on the size of manicured lawns, he said, which is important on Cape Cod because lawn fertilizers are associated with nitrogen runoff that pollutes water.

Russell Norton, agriculture and horticulture extension educator for the Cape Cod Cooperative Extension program, emailed that beach plums are “a suitable edible native that can easily be incorporated into a home landscape or in a natural border.”

He said the extension service encourages the plant’s use by making seedlings available

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Registration opens for Interior Design Society awards gala

HIGH POINT – Registration is now open for the Interior Design Society Designer of the Year Awards Gala. Set to be held virtually at 7 p.m. EST on Oct. 8, the gala is celebrating its 10th anniversary and is open to the public.

“We are extremely excited for this year’s awards program” said Jenny Cano, IDS executive director. “The digital platform has presented many new and unique opportunities.”

To attend the virtual awards gala, register on the IDS website. At the same link, thanks to event sponsors, a limited amount of celebration boxes are also available at the same site. Event sponsors include Frenchie’s Florals, High Point Market, Howard Elliott, Showplace Cabinetry, Mydoma Studio, Polywood, Sherwin-Williams, Surya and The Romo Group.

With spaces ranging from bedrooms to outdoor spaces, the program spotlights the talent of IDS designers in more than 30 Designer of the Year categories that were judged by a panel that included:

  • Sasha Bikoff, Sasha Bikoff Interior Design
  • Chelsie Butler, Kitchen and Bath Business
  • Stacy Coulter, Stacy Coulter & Associates
  • Jane Dagmi, Designers Today
  • Mary Devincenzo, Norwalk Furniture
  • Allison Eden, Allison Eden Studios
  • Annmarrie Fabbi, Sherwin-Williams
  • Diane Falvey, Furniture, Lighting & Decor
  • Kelly Fridline, Kelly Fridline Design
  • Benni Frowein, Schumacher
  • Jenna Gaidusek, eDesign Tribe
  • Stephen Garrison, University Hall of Innovation
  • Frederic Henry, The Romo Group
  • Steve Hoffacker, Certified Aging in Place Specialist
  • Susan Inglis, Sustainable Furnishings Council
  • Margi Kyle, The Designing Doctor
  • Libby Langdon, Libby Langdon Interiors
  • Cheryl Luckett, Dwell by Cheryl
  • Molly Mays, Rizzy Home
  • LuAnn Nigara, A Well-Designed Business
  • Jannicke Ramso, Tiny Little Pads
  • Diane Rath, The Rath Project
  • Rebecca Sutton, Kitchen Design Concepts
  • Jackie Von Tobel, Jackie Von Tobel
  • Michele Williams, Scarlett Thread Consulting

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Sakaya Kitchen in Midtown Miami Will Become Society BBQ

When Richard Hales opened Sakaya Kitchen in 2009, Midtown wasn’t the bustling shopping and residential hub it is today. “Besides Target, I have the longest lease there,” the chef and restaurateur tells New Times over the phone.

Sakaya, which serves Hales’ takes on Asian and Southeast Asian food, was one of Miami’s first chef-driven fast-casual concepts. The storefront space became known for its Korean fried chicken, pork buns, and kalbi beef tater tots.

Hales has gone on to open several other concepts, including Blackbrick (also located in Midtown), the now-shuttered Bird & Bone in Miami Beach, and Society BBQ at the Citadel food hall in Little Haiti.

When COVID-19 forced the restaurant industry to rethink menus and business models, Hales was able to persevere with Society BBQ and Blackbrick. “Even considering the quarantine and lockdown, they’re doing very well,” Hales says. “Sales are not back to where they would normally be, but we’re surviving.”

Late last month, when restaurants in Miami-Dade County got the go-ahead to try indoor dining again, he was faced with a choice: Invest in renovating Sakaya Kitchen’s dining room and menu, or make a change.

He decided to transition the Sakaya Kitchen space in Midtown into a second Society BBQ.

“Part of my job as a restaurateur is to assess the risk on every dollar we spend. I just felt like I need to go with the sure thing. I can’t throw the limited dollars we have away, ” Hales explains.

Expected to open as early as next week, Society BBQ Midtown will offer the same menu as the Citadel location, along with some additions, such as the burger and chicken sandwich Hales served at Bird & Bone.

The chef says people are seeking comfort these days and barbecue is the ultimate comfort food.

“At Society, it’s ribs, mac and cheese, and cornbread. It’s pulled pork and chicken. It’s food that sells itself, and that’s appealing to me as a restaurateur.”

And the chef in Hales has discovered a newfound passion for cooking with fire.

“When I’m at home, I’m cooking with wood and honing my skills,” he says. “There’s something about leaving behind the electric and gas and using wood-fired grills. I’ve been toying with wood for six, seven years and you think you’re going to control the fire, then it does something else. This is now what I want to master.”

Even with all the changes, Hales is not shuttering — or even mothballing — Sakaya Kitchen. The restaurant will operate as a virtual entity. Fans of Sakaya’s Brussels sprouts and bao will still be able to order from the full menu online. Food will be prepared in Blackbrick’s kitchen.

Says Hales: “Sakaya’s still there. There’s still a heartbeat.” 

And there’s always the possibility it will return in restaurant form.

“As a chef, I would love to dig into Sakaya” again, he says. “Let me revive it — it’s my baby.

“I can spend an hour telling you why opening Society BBQ is a

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Belarusian Interior Ministry says 633 protesters were detained on September 6 – Society & Culture

MINSK, September 7. /TASS/. Belarusian law enforcers detained 633 protesters on Sunday, about 31,000 people took part in the protests, Interior Ministry Spokeswoman Olga Chemodanova said on Monday.

“Yesterday, on September 6, 42 protests were recorded in various populated areas of the country. <…> The total number of participants was about 31,000 people,” she said on her Telegram channel. “In all, 633 people were detained for violating the legislation on mass events, 363 people were taken into custody until the consideration of cases on administrative offences in court.”

According to the Interior Ministry, in the city of Grodno, radical activists tried to block traffic. They also threw plastic bottles, sticks and stones at law enforcement officers.

Belarus held its presidential election on August 9. According to the Central Election Commission’s data, incumbent President Alexander Lukashenko won 80.10% of the vote, whereas Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, who was considered to be his key rival, garnered 10.12% of the ballot. Subsequently, she refused to recognize the outcome of the polls. After the results of exit polls were announced late on August 9, mass protests flared up in downtown Minsk and other cities. In the early days they were accompanied by clashes between protesters and police. The authorities call for an end to illegal rallies, while the Coordination Council set up by the opposition demands more protests.

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