Save on cookware, small appliances and more

Shop and save at Macy’s during the VIP Sale. (Photo: All-Clad / Macy’s)

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The countdown to Amazon Prime Day is on, but you don’t have to wait to start saving at Macy’s. Thanks to the store’s huge VIP Sale, which is happening now through Tuesday, October 6, you can take an additional 10%, 15%, 25% or 30% off select items and use the promo code VIP to score even bigger savings.

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You can get massive discounts on top-rated home, fashion and beauty products during this dynamite endeavor. For example, you could score an exquisite seven-piece All-Clad cookware set, originally $839.99, and on sale for $499.99, for $374.99 with the coupon code, so you’ll save $465. We love All-Clad and think they make some of the best pots and pans—and best skillets—we’ve ever tried because they cook so evenly and look so elegant. This is just of many groovy deals you can pick up during this event: We’ve put together this list of our faves so you don’t miss a thing.

The product experts at Reviewed have all your shopping needs covered. Follow Reviewed on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for the latest deals, reviews, and more.

Prices were accurate at the time this article was published but may change over time.

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Can small pieces of land can bring neighborhoods together? Milwaukee urban garden, community education center proposed



a house on the side of a road: An urban garden and community education center is being proposed for a vacant lot near West Walnut and North 25th streets.


© City of Milwaukee
An urban garden and community education center is being proposed for a vacant lot near West Walnut and North 25th streets.

An urban garden and community education center is being proposed for a central city site northwest of downtown Milwaukee.

It would be developed on a 9,000-square-foot vacant lot, south of West Walnut Street between North 24th Lane and North 25th Street, by Venus Consulting LLC, according to a new Common Council resolution.

That resolution calls for selling the city-owned lot for $1 to Venus Consulting, which a Department of City Development report describes as a community advocacy, activism and education organization.

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The property would “be developed with garden amenities focusing on herbs, edible flowers, butterfly garden and serenity/meditation spaces,” the report said.

Most of the space would be used to grow medicinal plants, which can be used to make teas, and edible plants, said Jacqueline Ward, who operates Venus Consulting.

People would be taught how to grow those plants in their yards, homes or community gardens, Ward said.

The teaching would include a focus on the health benefits of eating plants, and the importance of creating space for bees and butterflies, which pollinate other crops, she said.

It’s not a traditional garden, said Ward, former executive director of the Marketplace Business Improvement District, which operates near the garden site.

“This is a totally new concept, focused on outdoor learning experiences (especially in wake of pandemic),” Ward wrote in an email.

Venus Consulting, a for-profit firm, would manage the operation, and do some programming. Superior Care Training Center Corp., a separate nonprofit group Ward operates, would provide teaching services.

“Another component will be working with small emerging nonprofit organizations and neighborhood associations helping them figure out how to utilize and create areas of conception of lots to bring people together (as gardens, meet up spaces-considering social distancing and safety) and how these small pieces of land can be a space for community and economic development,” she wrote.

Other nearby urban community gardens include Alice’s Garden, at North 21st Street and West Garfield Avenue.

Tom Daykin can be emailed at [email protected] and followed on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. 

Our subscribers make this reporting possible. Please consider supporting local journalism by subscribing to the Journal Sentinel at jsonline.com/deal.

This article originally appeared on Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Can small pieces of land can bring neighborhoods together? Milwaukee urban garden, community education center proposed

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Torres Small, Herrell meet in 1st debate in close House race

RIO RANCHO, N.M. (AP) — Democratic Rep. Xochitl Torres Small and Republican challenger Yvette Herrell finally have gone head-to-head in a debate in southern New Mexico’s closely watched U.S. House race.

Torres Small stressed “bipartisanship” during the KOAT-TV/Albuquerque Journal-sponsored debate Sunday while Herrell tried to link the Democrat to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Herrell said she would be a “conservative voice” and pointed to her “Christian values.” Torres Small repeatedly highlighted her votes on oil and gas that bucked the Democratic Party.

The race is a rematch of the 2018 campaign where Torres Small won by less than 4,000 votes to flip the traditionally Republican-leaning district. However, Herrell avoided televised debates then and faced criticism for failing to campaign in Hispanic areas.

This time, Herrell is campaigning in the Hispanic-majority Doña Ana County and has challenged Torres Small to multiple debates.

State numbers show that new GOP voter registrations outpaced Democrats in the 2nd Congressional District by 10,000 — more than twice the margin of victory in 2018.

Herrell campaign manager Michael Horanburg said those numbers show there is “energy and momentum” with Republicans to recapture the seat.

The Torres Small campaign said the Las Cruces Democrat has worked with Republicans, Democrats, and President Donald Trump on various proposals.

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Kalamazoo County commissioner faces small business owner in 61st House District race

Republican Bronwyn Haltom and Democrat Christine Morse are facing off to represent the 61st District in the Michigan House of Representatives.

Morse is a current Kalamazoo County commissioner representing District 9. She has a bachelor’s degree from Michigan State University and a law degree from Wayne State University Law School.

“Christine is Michigan native, former attorney, Kalamazoo County Commissioner, public school parent of 3, breast cancer survivor, and spouse of a Navy Veteran,” she said in her responses to the Vote411.org voter guide from the League of Women Voters.

Haltom Attended Kalamazoo Valley Community College and transferred to the University of Michigan, where she earned a bachelor’s degree.

“I was born here, educated here, and own a small business here. I believe in our community and am committed to serving our neighbors to move Michigan forward,” Haltom said in responses to the League of Michigan Voters voter guide.

Haltom defeated Tom Graham in the August primary election. Morse was unopposed in the Democratic primary.

The 61st District contains the city of Portage, Oshtemo, Texas, Prairie Ronde and Schoolcraft townships and the villages of Schoolcraft and Vicksburg in Kalamazoo County. Current GOP state Rep. Brandt Iden is term-limited.

MLive Media Group has again partnered with the League of Women Voters of Michigan Education Fund to provide candidate information and other voting resources to our readers. Each candidate was asked to answer a series of questions about their policy stances.

Information on all state and federal races and many of Michigan’s county and local races will be available at Vote411.org.

Here’s a look how both candidates responded to questions from the League of Women Voters candidate survey:

EDUCATION: What is your position on the role of public funding of education in Michigan? What measures do you support/propose to improve educational outcomes and accessibility for all Michigan students?

Morse: As a public school graduate and parent, public education funding is my top issue. Teachers are vastly underpaid and class sizes are unreasonably high. In addition to rectifying the disinvestment we’ve seen over the last couple of decades, we are 50th in the country in reading growth. I believe we need to invest seriously in our public education – both through skilled trades programs, retraining, and higher education if we want our kids to be able to build a life here in Michigan. We also need to reevaluate our testing standards and make sure to involve educators in the process of rewriting.

Haltom: Public education is the most important investment the State of Michigan can make in our future, and I support robust education funding that prepares Michigan students for the jobs of tomorrow. The legislature must find long-term solutions to address Michigan’s third grade reading levels that bring together parents, teachers, administrators and students. I support measures to expand opportunities that empower parents and guardians to make decisions that best fit their student’s educational needs. We must also promote and invest in skilled trades and vocational learning as an additional path to

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RV renovation: Big changes, small decor touches make a motorhome feel homey | Food + Living

After being grounded for months, we’ve become antsy, craving adventure and escape. But with social distancing recommendations still clipping our wings, plane, bus and train travel seem worrisome.

Home still feels safer than anywhere else. What to do? Why, take that home on the open road. That’s precisely what a motorhome or camper lets us do. It’s no wonder that the RV Industry Association reports a sharp uptick in RV sales and rentals.

“Our inventory is down to a dozen vehicles,” says Autumn Quinn, marketing manager of Dylane RV Center, Denver. “Normally we would have about 80 vehicles on the lot. Spontaneity and freedom are key attractions to travel by RV, and they are precisely what families are looking for after all those COVID constraints.”

Lee Vought of Stoltzfus RV of Adamstown agrees. “We have four RVs in the lot. Normally, we’d have 100.”

Dealers say that RV manufacturers are working hard to improve motor homes’ interiors, but at price tags of $50,000 to $100,000 for new motor homes, or even more depending on sizes and features, older models are obviously popular. However, their interiors are an issue for design-minded buyers.

Some RVs practically beg for design intervention. But it seems a daunting task. RVs are smaller spaces, so every decision counts, and plywood walls and boring cabinets make you want to start from scratch and tear everything apart.

Chic comes to old RV

Designer Anastasia Laudermilch of Annville understands this problem. She faced it herself when she and her husband bought a 1999 Winnebago.

“We bought it for weekend trips,” she says. “We like the escape once in a while. But I couldn’t live with its interior, and I ended up changing every inch. It was a DIY job, lots of work, but also very satisfying. Rolling down the road in a comfortable, attractive vehicle makes weekend adventures so much better.”

What in the past may, to some, may have given RVs a reputation for tackiness has been all the woody surfaces. So Laudermilch started right there, painting the walls light gray and the upper cabinets black.



Anastasia Laudermilch and motorhome

This is Anastasia Laudermilch’s 1999 Winnebago motorhome Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020.




“That alone made a dramatic difference,” she says. “I found a great product called Zar, easy to use because it is just wiped on. New hardware on cabinets and drawers followed.

“In the kitchen, a pretty glass mosaic backsplash and a new vinyl plank floor were big upgrades. The ceiling light over the kitchen table was boring, so I covered it with a gold-finished basket,” she says.



Anastasia Laudermilch and motorhome

This is the cooking area on Anastasia Laudermilch’s motorhome Thursday, Sept. 17, 2020. The countertop on the right folds back to expose a gas stove.




“I cannot emphasize enough what a difference all those little things made, and they were all inexpensive,” she says. “For example, I used moldings to create a nice mirror frame in the bathroom, and I found a lovely crackle-finished

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House Republicans try to force PPP small business vote

House Republicans will attempt to quickly force a vote on a bill to replenish a key coronavirus small business aid program, according to congressional aides. 

The GOP lawmakers on Wednesday will unveil a two-part proposal designed to restart the Paycheck Protection Program. Reps. Steve Chabot of Ohio and Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington plan to introduce proposals to reopen applications for the $138 billion that remains unspent from the small business loan program, along with a so-called discharge petition to force a vote on the bill. 

Under the legislation, companies could apply for a second loan if they have fewer than 300 employees and have seen revenue decline by 25%. The GOP is expected to be able to start gathering signatures on the petition next Friday, and would need 218 to move toward a vote. If all 198 Republicans support the move, the party would need 20 Democrats to join. 

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has repeatedly said the chamber will only take up a comprehensive coronavirus relief package. Democratic leaders have previously rejected efforts to renew standalone relief policies such as unemployment insurance as they push for legislation that would cost at least $2.2 trillion. 

The Republican maneuver underscores the growing agitation among members of both major parties to approve more pandemic aid ahead of the 2020 election. GOP senators vulnerable in November have pushed to pass more relief, while House Democrats running in competitive races have reportedly grown increasingly impatient with Pelosi’s strategy. 

Coronavirus stimulus talks between the Trump administration and Democratic leaders effectively fell apart last month and have made little progress since. However, President Donald Trump urged Republicans to support a more ambitious stimulus package on Wednesday. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows also said he has grown more optimistic about a deal in recent days. 

On Tuesday, the bipartisan House Problem Solvers Caucus put forward a $1.5 trillion plan, which Democratic leaders opposed. 

Last week, Senate Democrats blocked a roughly $500 billion Republican relief plan that Democrats called inadequate to address economic and health-care crises.

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Small bathroom storage ideas | CNN Underscored

The bathroom is one of the most purely functional rooms in the home, but for many people, their bathroom doesn’t function well at all — especially if it’s very small. If you’re struggling to make a small bathroom work for you, or if you’ve got space but no built-in storage features like drawers, cabinets or an under-sink area, these tips and product recommendations from professional organizers can help you get the bathroom of your dreams…or at least close to it!

“As always, the number one suggestions for living in small spaces of all sorts is to get rid of everything you no longer need, use, want or love,” Ann Lightfoot, a professional organizer and co-founder of Done and Done Home, says. She notes that nothing should be stored in a bathroom that won’t be used this year, and takes a hard line with her clients when it comes to casting off things that are taking up valuable space. “The minute someone finds themselves saying, ‘Yeah, but…it’s really good, it was expensive, I might use it…’ they’re going wrong,” she says.

When eliminating items, Lightfoot looks for what she calls “space hogs” — especially things like hairstyling tools that haven’t been used in years but that were expensive and therefore can be hard to part with. “The question to ask yourself is what do I want more, a functioning bathroom today or a chance that I’ll curl my hair in the unknown future?” she says.

Both Lightfoot and Nonnahs Driskill, a professional organizer and founder of Get Organized Already, say the most common mistake people make when setting up their small bathroom is not utilizing vertical space. Driskill also encourages people with limited bathroom space to “break with traditional rules about what goes in the bathroom. Store bathroom items you don’t use every day somewhere else in the house.”

She suggests assembling a “pampering kit” made up of items you use only once a month or so, like sheet masks and soothing foot balms, that can be stashed in the bedroom. Store cough syrup, aspirin, antihistamine and other over-the-counter medications in a travel bag or small container in a bedroom drawer, hallway cabinet or in the kitchen.

Lightfoot explains that pedestal sinks, which offer no under-sink storage and limited ledge space for things like hand soap and lotion, can easily and fairly inexpensively be replaced with a vanity — even in rentals. “I know it seems like a big investment for a rental, but if you plan to stay a couple years and get approval from your landlord, you can have a bathroom that actually works for the years you’re there,” she says.

Style Selections Euro Single Sink Bathroom Vanity ($159; lowes.com)

Style Selections Euro Single Sink Bathroom Vanity

Style Selections Euro Single Sink Bathroom Vanity

PHOTO:
Lowe’s

Ahead, Lightfoot and Driskill suggest some of their favorite products and hacks for maximizing space in a small bathroom, including ones they recommend to their clients over and over again — and ones they use in their own homes.

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How to elevate a small, urban plot for maximum impact

A colleague recently enlisted my advice about replanting the front and side yards of his Capitol Hill townhouse. Thankfully, there was little existing vegetation (or he had cleared it already) and it was spared the tired, overgrown fate of many small urban yards.

We are entering prime season for renovating landscapes, and his project got me thinking about what folks need to know about successful makeovers and why so many small gardens go wrong. Before speaking to the right way, let’s imagine the ravages of time on a city garden the size of my colleague’s. His corner lot features an entrance garden of about 20 by 20 feet, bisected by a brick path. The connected side yard is about six feet wide and 25 feet long.

This blank slate seemed primed for a wholesale replanting that would grow into a fresh, beautiful and deeply satisfying landscape. Such a garden would stand out too against all those urban lots whose plantings had grown to blur the original spatial relationships and design intent.

Typically, hedges planted when the “Jurassic Park” film franchise cranked up in 1993 have become themselves menacing dinosaurs. They were originally intended to define the property or to provide screening but are now too broad at the top and too thin at the bottom. Similarly, both deciduous and evergreen shrubs expand into paths and shade out other plants around and beneath them. Time flies, time fudges.

Large trees provide their own conundrum. You don’t want to take down a mature shade tree — and in some jurisdictions are constrained from doing so — but at the same time you shouldn’t live under a constant gloom of shade and tree litter. (The worst offender might be a Southern magnolia.) Often, you can remove the lowest limbs and thin out the canopy to reclaim space and light. This can go badly wrong in several ways, though, and is a job for a competent and qualified certified arborist.

All gardens sag with time, all gardens need constant tweaking and adjustment, but ones that are put together with careful consideration of plant choices will age slowly and even gloriously. After removing old vegetation from the site (and improving the soil) consider my general principles for planting in small gardens:

Don’t plant for instant effect. Perennials and grasses take two to three years to reach established size, ground covers can take as long or longer to fill in, and trees and shrubs should take at least five years to have any real presence. Anything rushed or planted too thickly will come back to bite you. Central to the last point is this: Don’t plant fast-growing trees and shrubs. A variety with an annual growth rate of more than 12 inches (high or wide) would raise a flag to me.

Reduce the number of prospective ornamental trees and shrubs, and regard each one you do plant as a piece of sculpture, to be positioned and spaced with utmost consideration.

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6 stylish, space-saving small bathroom storage ideas EVERYONE needs



a room with a sink and a mirror: null


© Provided by Real Homes
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If you’re in the market for small bathroom storage ideas, you’ve come to the right place. Squeezing everything a bathroom needs to be functional and practical into a small space is tricky at the best of times, and when you add storage on top of that – crucial for family bathrooms in particular – it can be hard to know where to start.

To help you out, we’ve rounded up our favourite storage solutions for genuinely small bathrooms. And it’s not all about installing shelving or building in storage units, either, for all the renters out there: there are easy updates you can pull together in minutes that won’t take a chunk out of your deposit.

Read on for our pick of the best clutter-clearing, space-saving solutions, then head to our bathroom ideas gallery for more great ways to spruce your space.

1. Add a wall-hung vanity unit for a space-enhancing illusion

Vanity units are the holy grail of bathroom storage, doubling up as worktop space and somewhere to stow away your favourite beauty buys all at once. The most compact designs are perfect for smaller spaces, but we’ve got an extra bit of trickery for you, too: opt for a wall-hung unit like this homeowner and the flow of the floor underneath will create the illusion of more space. You’re welcome!

2. Use built-in shelving for a seamless finish

One for the bathroom renovators out there, built-in shelving can add much-needed storage and display space without impeding too much on a small room. This homeowner used shelves built in over the toilet (also wall-hung – told you it was a good trick) to store toilet paper and add personality with decorative items, but you could also add an alcove in your shower to keep shampoo bottles to hand.

3. Choose a mirrored cabinet for beauty bits and bobs

A mirrored cabinet is one of the most valuable items you can have in a small bathroom thanks to its multifunctional nature – and modern designs can be pretty stylish to boot. They’ll store a deceptively large number of items away and are perfect for keeping everything from toothbrushes to makeup to hand. We like the Godmorgon cabinet from Ikea for its simplicity.

4. Create instant storage with ladder shelving

Sleek, slimline furniture is the order of the day when it comes to small bathrooms, and ladder shelving in particular is a godsend when it comes to storage – as shown by this homeowner’s neat ‘n’ tidy display. They take up very little floor space, can fit in the smallest of gaps and will keep everything from bottles to toilet rolls tidy – as well as giving you extra display space for your houseplant collection that’s getting out of hand.

5. Add decorative details that double up as storage

Wall hooks, pegboards and baskets will all add extra storage capacity to your bathroom while looking stylish, too, as this set-up from George Home shows. Baskets

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Small quarters means more attention to kitchen essentials

We’ve been gearing up for our fall RV trip and for the resident cook that means getting the kitchen dialed in.

Take it away, Chef Leslie!

One of the biggest shocks about downsizing from a full kitchen to a tiny setup was the large number of tools I had to leave on the shelf back at home. I thought I couldn’t live without them.

Guess what? I’ve adapted. Less isn’t exactly more, but it’s just fine to streamline what’s in the single cupboard and the lone drawer where the cooking essentials live. These are the tools I can’t do without in our RV.

Cast iron skillet: I’ve worn out plenty of non-stick pots and pans over the years, both cheap and spendy, but when it comes to durability, nothing tops my trusty cast iron skillet. This MVP sears salmon fillets and braises chicken in wine. It’s key in creating fluffy pancakes and eggs fried sunny-side up, crispy around the edges. I’ve even baked cakes in it. Our special bond goes back more than 25 years when I found it at a second-hand shop on the Oregon Coast. Ah, sweet memories.

Staying sharp: There’s a butcher block filled with knives back in my full kitchen, but the go-to slice-and-dicer is an eight-inch chef’s knife, followed by a paring knife. Those are no good, though, unless they’re sharp. Enter the amazing Wüsthof hand-held sharpener. It’s a bit bulky, so it’s tucked under the couch until it’s needed. I take a couple of passes with a dull knife through this affordable gizmo and I’m back in action.

More than a peeler: Speaking of sharp, my trusty vegetable peeler has been drafted into duty far beyond scraping carrots clean. I put it to good use making zoodles, ribbons of veggies like summer squash standing in for noodles. When it shaves Parmesan over a Caesar salad and turns citrus peels into flavor-packed zest, that peeler is almost like a hand-held food processor.

Magnifique coffee press: Someone in our traveling twosome cannot function without the morning caffeine kickstarter, so we invested in a top-notch coffee maker. The Espro P7 has two built-in microfilters to create a smooth cuppa. The double-sided stainless carafe helps keep it hot until that certain somebody’s eyes are wide open and his adventuring spirit wonders: “What trail do you want to explore today?”

Electric kettle: Ever since a long-ago trip to England, we’ve been fans of heating water in a kettle that’s plugged in. Don’t forget to occasionally descale the kettle with a vinegar solution, especially after staying in a place with hard water.

It’s the champ: Absolutely couldn’t be happier than when cooking outdoors on the excellent George Foreman Smokeless Grill. Yes, I love the flavor imparted by charcoal and wood chips, but this grill offers the ability to control the heat. I’ve made neighbors jealous frying bacon, burgers and chops, the savory fragrance perfuming the air. It also puts a pretty char on veggies and has even been pressed into

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