Fox News reporter slams White House for deflecting on white supremacy

  • Fox News reporter John Roberts lost his temper on air on Thursday as he discussed the White House’s efforts to dance around questions on President Donald Trump’s stance on white supremacy.
  • “Stop deflecting. Stop blaming the media. I’m tired of it,” Roberts, Fox News’ chief White House correspondent, said in an impassioned reaction to Thursday’s press briefing.
  • During the presidential debate on Tuesday, Trump declined to explicitly condemn white-supremacist groups.
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Fox News reporter John Roberts on Thursday became visibly frustrated with the White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany’s responses to questions on why President Donald Trump had not condemned white supremacist groups.

“Stop deflecting. Stop blaming the media. I’m tired of it,” Roberts, Fox News’ chief White House correspondent, said in an impassioned reaction to Thursday’s press briefing.

“The press secretary would not, in a definitive and unambiguous and non-deflecting way, say that the president condemns white supremacism in all its forms and any group that espouses it,” Roberts told the Fox host Melissa Francis.

He mentioned that several prominent Republicans in Congress had urged Trump to “correct” his recent statements on the matter.

“For all of you on Twitter who are hammering me for asking that question, I don’t care!” Roberts said. “Because it’s a question that needs to be asked, and clearly the president’s Republican colleagues a mile away from here are looking for an answer for it too.”

During the briefing, Roberts asked McEnany for a declarative statement on whether the president denounced white supremacism and groups that espouse it.

McEnany falsely said Trump had “condemned white supremacy more than any other president in modern history.” White-supremacist and other far-right groups have frequently celebrated Trump’s rhetoric and policy positions, and white nationalists have endorsed him in the past.

The White House press secretary went on to misleadingly say that Trump’s “record on this is unmistakable,” adding that it was “shameful that the media refuses to cover it.”

Later, McEnany went after Roberts on Twitter and noted that his wife, the reporter Kyra Phillips, said in a tweet on Wednesday that Trump “tells me he DENOUNCES white supremacists.”

But Roberts’ questions on Thursday were linked to Trump’s well-documented history of decrying white supremacy only feebly after public pressure. The president has repeatedly failed to forcefully condemn white-supremacist groups and their ideology.

Trump has on many occasions made comments that directly align with the worldviews of white supremacists; he told a rally of nearly all white supporters in Minnesota last month that they had “good genes” as he referenced the “racehorse theory.”

It’s true that the president has disavowed white-supremacist groups in some instances. But this has generally occurred after he received an endorsement from such groups or people associated with them — including the Ku Klux Klan — or after he ignited backlash for making racist or xenophobic statements.

In one of the most infamous moments of his presidency,

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WATCH: House Minority Leader McCarthy slams Pelosi on COVID-19 relief

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy harshly criticized House Speaker Nancy Pelosi over her negotiating position on COVID relief, saying the Democrats’ plan “mentions cannabis more than it mentions jobs.”

Watch McCarthy’s remarks in the player above.

“There are so many problems with the Democratic bill, why it’s gone nowhere,” McCarthy said.

“Could she not see past politics for once?” he asked rhetorically.

The White House is backing a $400 per week pandemic jobless benefit and is dangling the possibility of a COVID-19 relief bill of $1.6 trillion as last-ditch, pre-election negotiations hit a critical phase Thursday.

But pessimism is again seeping into the talks and the two sides switched back to attacking each other in public.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Speaker Pelosi were expected to talk by phone early Thursday afternoon, but the speaker was publicly dismissive of the latest White House plan.

Pelosi postponed debate Wednesday on a Democratic alternative measure in hopes of getting an agreement.

A vote is likely on Thursday, spokesman Drew Hammill said, depending on how the Mnuchin-Pelosi exchanges go.

McCarthy also said he thought President Donald Trump won Tuesday night’s presidential debate with Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

The first of three scheduled debates between Trump and Biden deteriorated into bitter taunts and chaos Tuesday night as the Republican president repeatedly interrupted his Democratic rival with angry jabs that overshadowed any substantive discussion of the crises threatening the nation.

McCarthy’s advice to Trump was to let Biden talk more.

“I think the more he talks, the more the American public would decide they don’t want Joe Biden,” he said.

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White House slams FBI chief Wray over voter fraud testimony

By Doina Chiacu



a man wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on "Threats to the Homeland", on Capitol Hill in Washington


© Reuters/POOL
FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on “Threats to the Homeland”, on Capitol Hill in Washington

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – FBI Director Christopher Wray faced criticism from the White House for the second time in a week on Friday when President Donald Trump’s chief of staff questioned his ability to detect voter fraud as the November election draws near.

Wray told lawmakers on Thursday he has not seen evidence of a “coordinated national voter fraud effort,” undercutting the Republican president’s unfounded assault on mail-in balloting before his Nov. 3 contest against Democrat Joe Biden.

Mark Meadows, the White House chief of staff, denigrated Wray during an interview with CBS “This Morning.”

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there’s any kind of voter fraud,” he said without elaborating.

A top federal prosecutor in the battleground state of Pennsylvania on Thursday said his office and the FBI were investigating whether nine military ballots cast for Trump had been handled improperly.

Meadows suggested to CBS that Wray “drill down on the investigation that just started … Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and then he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill.”

The FBI had no comment on Meadows’ remarks.

Trump appointed Wray as FBI director after he fired James Comey in 2017 during a federal probe into ties between the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and Russia.

Last week, Wray testified before a House of Representatives committee that his biggest concern in the 2020 election was the “steady drumbeat of misinformation” coming from Russian interference.

That prompted Trump to retort, “I did not like his answers yesterday.”

Wray’s statements run contrary to the Republican president’s stances as he seeks re-election on Nov. 3 in the race against Democrat Joe Biden. Trump continues to downplay the threat from Moscow and argues that mail-in voting, which many states are relying on during the coronavirus pandemic, poses a threat to election security.



a man wearing a suit and tie: FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on "Threats to the Homeland", on Capitol Hill in Washington


© Reuters/POOL
FILE PHOTO: Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on “Threats to the Homeland”, on Capitol Hill in Washington

Asked if Trump had confidence in Wray, Meadows told reporters on Friday he has not spoken to the president about it.

Trump himself has repeatedly and without evidence questioned the increased use of mail-in ballots, an established method of voting in the United States.

He also continues to bristle at U.S. intelligence agencies’ finding that Russia acted to boost Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign and undermine his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Additional reporting by Susan Heavey; Editing by Nick Zieminski and Cynthia Osterman)

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White House Slams FBI Chief Wray Over Voter Fraud Testimony | Top News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows on Friday denigrated FBI Director Christopher Wray’s ability to detect voter fraud in the U.S. election and suggested that if he “drill down” more he would change his congressional testimony on the issue.

Wray told lawmakers on Thursday he has not seen evidence of a coordinated national voter fraud effort, undercutting President Donald Trump’s unfounded assault on mail-in balloting as a threat to election security.

“With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI, let alone figuring out whether there’s any kind of voter fraud,” Meadows said on CBS “This Morning.” It was not clear what missing emails he was referring to.

A top federal prosecutor in the battleground state of Pennsylvania on Thursday said his office and the FBI was investigating whether nine military ballots cast for Trump had been handled improperly.

Earlier in the day, Wray told the Senate Homeland Security Committee that, “We have not seen, historically, any kind of coordinated national voter fraud effort in a major election, whether it’s by mail or otherwise. We have seen voter fraud at the local level from time to time.”

Meadows suggested on CBS that Wray “drill down on the investigation that just started … Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and then he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill.”

The FBI did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Meadows’ remarks.

Trump appointed Wray as FBI director after he fired James Comey in 2017 during a federal probe into ties between the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and Russia.

Earlier this month, Wray testified before a House of Representatives committee that his biggest concern in the 2020 election was the “steady drumbeat of misinformation” coming from Russian interference.

Both statements run contrary to the Republican president’s stances as he seeks re-election on Nov. 3 in the race against Democrat Joe Biden. Trump continues to downplay the threat from Moscow and argues that mail-in voting, which many states are relying on during the coronavirus pandemic, poses a threat to election security.

Asked if Trump had confidence in Wray, Meadows told reporters on Friday he has not spoken to the president about it.

Trump himself has repeatedly and without evidence questioned the increased use of mail-in ballots, a long established method of voting in the United States.

The Republican president has long bristled at that U.S. intelligence agencies’ finding that Russia acted to boost now-Trump’s 2016 campaign and undermine his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton.

Trump repeatedly referenced Clinton’s “missing emails” during that campaign, mockingly asking Russia to help find them. A State Department investigation of Clinton’s use of a private email server while she was secretary of state has found no evidence of deliberate mishandling of classified information.

(Reporting by Doina Chiacu; Additional reporting by Susan Heavey; Editing by Nick Zieminski)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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House panel slams Boeing, FAA for 737 Max crashes while calling for reforms

A House committee issued a scathing report Wednesday questioning whether Boeing and government regulators have recognized problems that caused two deadly 737 Max jet crashes and whether either will be willing to make significant changes to fix them.

Staff members from the Democrat-controlled Transportation Committee blamed the crashes that killed 346 people on the “horrific culmination” of failed government oversight, design flaws and a lack of action at Boeing despite knowing about problems.

The committee identified deficiencies in the Federal Aviation Administration approval process for new jetliners. But the agency and Boeing have said certification of the Max complied with FAA regulations, the 246-page report said.

“The fact that a compliant airplane suffered from two deadly crashes in less than five months is clear evidence that the current regulatory system is fundamentally flawed and needs to be repaired,” the staff wrote in the report released early Wednesday.

The report highlights the need for legislation to fix the approval process and deal with the FAA’s delegation of some oversight tasks to aircraft manufacturer employees, said Committee Chairman Peter DeFazio, D-Oregon.

“Obviously the system is inadequate,” DeFazio said. “We will be adopting significant reforms.”

He wouldn’t give details, saying committee leaders are in talks with Republicans about legislation. He said the committee won’t scrap the delegation program, and he hopes to reach agreement on reforms before year’s end.

A Senate committee on Wednesday could make changes to a bipartisan bill giving the FAA more control over picking company employees who sign off on safety decisions. One improvement may be that a plane with significant changes from previous models would need more FAA review.

The House report stems from an 18-month investigation into the October 2018 crash of Lion Air flight 610 in Indonesia and the crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 in March of 2019. The Max was grounded worldwide shortly after the Ethiopia crash. Regulators are testing planes with revamped flight control software, and Boeing hopes to get the Max flying again late this year or early in 2021.

Relatives of people who died in the crashes said the report exposes the truth.

“It was an unforgivable crime, and Boeing still wants to return the aircraft to service quickly,” said Ababu Amha, whose wife was a flight attendant on the Ethiopia Airlines jet. “All those responsible for the accident should pay the price for their actions.”

Paul Njoroge of Toronto, whose wife, three young children and mother-in-law died in the Ethiopia crash while traveling to Kenya to see grandparents, said the report revealed Boeing’s culture of putting profit ahead of safety.

“There are instances in the report where some employees within Boeing tried to raise safety concern issues. But their concerns would be slammed by people within Boeing,” said Njoroge, who is among those suing the company. “This is an organization that should focus more on delivering safe planes.”

Eighteen months after the crash, Njoroge said he still relies on support from others. “It just doesn’t go away. It never leaves

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Eric Burdon Slams Trump For Unauthorized Use Of The Animals’ ‘House Of The Rising Sun’



a man wearing glasses talking on a cell phone: Getty Images


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There’s a lengthy list of music stars who’ve taken issue with having their music played at Donald Trump’s rallies without permission, ranging from Neil Young to Steven Tyler to Adele.

The latest name to add to that roster is Eric Burdon, frontman for British Invasion hitmakers The Animals.

On Saturday, the 79-year-old rocker shared a photo of himself wearing a face mask emblazoned with the word “VOTE.”

RELATED: Eddy Grant Files Lawsuit Against Donald Trump For Using ‘Electric Avenue’ In Campaign Video

“Even though nobody asked my permission, I wasn’t surprised to learn that #Trump #864511320 used #HouseoftheRisingSun for his rally the other day,” he said of The Animals’ rock version of the classic folk song about a house of ill repute in New Orleans, while also sneaking in the #864511320 hashtag, which links to an Instagram page for Joe Biden’s campaign.

“A tale of sin and misery set in a brothel suits him so perfectly!” added Burdon of Trump before referencing another Animals it. “Far more appropriate for this time in our history might be #WeGottaGetOutofThisPlace.”

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Even though nobody asked my permission, I wasn’t surprised to learn that #Trump #864511320 used #HouseoftheRisingSun for his rally the other day…A tale of sin and misery set in a brothel suits him so perfectly! Far more appropriate for this time in our history might be #WeGottaGetOutofThisPlace. This is my answer #vote #saveourdemocracy #bidenharris2020 A post shared by Eric Burdon (@officialericburdon) on Sep 5, 2020 at 3:45pm PDT

Burdon concluded by telling his followers, “This is my answer #vote #saveourdemocracy #bidenharris2020.”

Back in June, The Rolling Stones announced they’d be taking legal action against Trump after his campaign repeatedly ignored cease-and-desist letters over the unauthorized use of their song “You Can’t Always Get What You Want”.

RELATED: Rolling Stones Threaten Trump With Lawsuit If He Continues To Use Their Music At Rallies

“This could be the last time Trump uses any Jagger/ Richards songs on his campaigns,” the band’s rep said in a statement.

“The BMI have notified the Trump campaign on behalf of the Stones that the unauthorized use of their songs will constitute a breach of its licensing agreement,” the rep added. “If Donald Trump disregards the exclusion and persists then he would face a lawsuit for breaking the embargo and playing music that has not been licensed.”

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