Man set bathroom on fire after saying he’d blow the place up

A Des Moines man was arrested this week after authorities said he set fire to a bathroom in a business.According to court documents, security cameras caught Joseph Barrese Jr. went into the bathroom of Big Dog Billiards at 4:10 p.m. Jan. 4. Police say he used lighter fluid and a flame to start a fire in the bathroom. The police report states Barrese exited the establishment about three minutes later. Four minutes after he left, staff noticed a haze in the bar. Big Dog Billiards staff then found the fire in a bathroom stall as well as the lighter fluid. “Flames were described as being three to four feet high on the wall moving toward the ceiling,” the police report stated. Barrese was identified by multiple witnesses and employees. “(Barrese) was also heard making comments about ‘blowing the place up’ approximately 20 minutes before the fire was discovered,” the police report stated. Cameras at a Casey’s show him stealing lighter fluid and getting matches. Barrese has been charged with first-degree arson as well as other offenses and is being held at the Polk County Jail.

A Des Moines man was arrested this week after authorities said he set fire to a bathroom in a business.

According to court documents, security cameras caught Joseph Barrese Jr. went into the bathroom of Big Dog Billiards at 4:10 p.m. Jan. 4. Police say he used lighter fluid and a flame to start a fire in the bathroom.

The police report states Barrese exited the establishment about three minutes later. Four minutes after he left, staff noticed a haze in the bar.

Big Dog Billiards staff then found the fire in a bathroom stall as well as the lighter fluid.

“Flames were described as being three to four feet high on the wall moving toward the ceiling,” the police report stated.

Barrese was identified by multiple witnesses and employees.

“(Barrese) was also heard making comments about ‘blowing the place up’ approximately 20 minutes before the fire was discovered,” the police report stated.

Cameras at a Casey’s show him stealing lighter fluid and getting matches.

Barrese has been charged with first-degree arson as well as other offenses and is being held at the Polk County Jail.

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Popular West Palm eatery Kitchen set to open second location at Alton Town Center



a man and a woman standing in a room: Aliza Byrne and Chef Matthew Byrne own and operate Kitchen restaurant in West Palm Beach. [Photo by LILA PHOTO]


© [LILA PHOTO]
Aliza Byrne and Chef Matthew Byrne own and operate Kitchen restaurant in West Palm Beach. [Photo by LILA PHOTO]

PALM BEACH GARDENS — Seven years after opening their popular American brasserie Kitchen in West Palm Beach, Chef Matthew Byrne and his wife, Aliza, are preparing to debut the sequel. 

The West Palm Beach residents will unveil their second Kitchen restaurant early next month at Alton Town Center in Palm Beach Gardens.

The eatery, which will seat 150 with ample outdoor space and a private room, joins a growing list of new restaurants at the 360,203-square-foot retail complex on Donald Ross Road.

More: Gardens McDonald’s reopens dining room after $450,000 contemporary renovation

More: Miller’s Ale House to open next year at Alton Town Center in Gardens

The location was a perfect one for the Byrnes, who were eager to expand into an area where many of their regular customers live, including nearby Jupiter.

“It’s such an amazing community there,” said Aliza Byrne, who has grown familiar with the area since her teenage sons began attending The Benjamin School. “A lot of our clients live nearby. There was such a huge demand from people who said they wished we were closer. We feel really good about it.”

Byrne said she expects to draw more year-round diners to the new Alton Town Center location, whereas the original Kitchen, at 319 Belvedere Rd., is more seasonal.

That restaurant, which has drawn a steady stream of locals and visiting VIPs since it first opened in October 2013, seated just 36 people initially and served only beer, wine and champagne for the first three years.

The Alton Town Center restaurant will have a ‘proper’ bar, Byrne said, which will allow for a bar menu and happy hour.

“We were never able to have a happy hour,” she said. “We’re really excited about that.”



a chicken sandwich and salad on a plate: Kitchen's chicken schnitzel is one of Chef Matthew Byrne's favorites.


© [Contributed by LibbyVision.com]
Kitchen’s chicken schnitzel is one of Chef Matthew Byrne’s favorites.

The restaurant also will have valet parking, an outdoor patio, and private event space that can accommodate up to 20 people.

The menu will feature most of the same, modernized comfort classics created by chef Byrne — a former personal chef for golf great Tiger Woods — that are found at the original Kitchen, such as fettuccine bolognese, seared strip steak and chicken schnitzel.

“Our philosophy is to keep it simple, buy the freshest and do as little as possible,” Aliza Byrne said. “With everything from a foie gras burger to a grilled fish, to somebody who has celiac (disease) or is a vegetarian or a vegan, we want everyone to enjoy. There’s something for everybody.”

Kitchen will open for dinner initially, but plans are to add a Saturday and Sunday brunch.

Byrne said she is excited to finally open the Kitchen doors after months of planning and a four-month delay brought on by the novel coronavirus pandemic.

“It’s been so fun to create a space from scratch,” she said. “With our space in West Palm,

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Coronavirus live news: WHO daily cases set new record at more than 350,000 | World news





Trump again calls for in-person debate, citing doctor’s letter

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What we know so far: Trump expected to return to public engagements on Saturday

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Donald Trump added more turbulence on Thursday to the US presidential race by refusing to participate in the next presidential debate with Joe Biden after it was changed to a virtual event to guard against the spread of Covid-19, prompting both campaigns to propose postponing it a week.

On Thursday morning, the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) said that the next presidential debate, due on 15 October, would be a virtual affair, with the candidates appearing remotely.

“In order to protect the health and safety of all, the second presidential debate will take the form of a town meeting, in which the candidates would participate from separate remote locations,” it said.

But Trump, who was hospitalized for three days after disclosing last Friday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, blasted the format change announced by the nonpartisan commission in charge of the debates and expressed concern that his microphone could be cut off at the event:

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Fundraiser set up for mother struck, seriously injured near Boston Public Garden



a car parked on a city street: A crashed truck, at Boylston and Charles streets, was involved in a serious accident, next to the Boston Public Garden.


© Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff
A crashed truck, at Boylston and Charles streets, was involved in a serious accident, next to the Boston Public Garden.

An online fundraiser has been set up for the woman injured when an allegedly stolen truck crashed near the Boston Public Garden last week.

Kamila Guimaraes had been married for just a few weeks when she was injured. She’s also the mother of a 9-year-old son, according to the GoFundMe page.

The money will go to help her pay for rent and other expenses as she recovers, the page says, noting that she may be out of work for sometime, and could remain hospitalized “for a while.” It says she’s in critical condition.

As of Thursday afternoon, the fundraiser had brought in over $16,700 of a $100,000 goal.

The crash happened around 4:23 p.m. last Thursday, Boston police said in a press release. Keith Andrade, 58, of Boston, was later arrested and charged in connection with the incident.

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Susan Collins: Trump didn’t set a ‘good example’ by taking mask off at White House

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsMurkowski after Trump halts talks: Congress must move on virus package Susan Collins: Punting coronavirus relief until after election a ‘huge mistake’ Biden leads Trump by 11 points in Maine: survey MORE (R-Maine) said President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump and Biden’s plans would both add to the debt, analysis finds Trump says he will back specific relief measures hours after halting talks Trump lashes out at FDA over vaccine guidelines MORE, who is currently infected with COVID-19, didn’t set a “good example” when he took off his mask outside of the White House earlier this week, shortly after leaving Walter Reed hospital.

“When I saw him on the balcony of the White House, taking off his mask, I couldn’t help but think that he sent the wrong signal, given that he’s infected with COVID-19 and that there are many people in his immediate circle who have the virus,” Collins told The Associated Press. “I did not think that was a good example at all.” 

Collins, who is fighting for her political life as she tries to hold onto her Senate seat, has previously been critical of the president’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, saying earlier this year that it had been “extremely uneven” and that he “should have been straightforward” about the seriousness of the disease. 

Trump was spotted taking off his mask on Monday as he posed for photos from the balcony above the South Lawn. After landing in Marine One, Trump walked up the stairs of the South Portico, removed his mask and looked over the balcony.

The president was near an official photographer, and other staffers could be seen behind him. He did not put his mask back on as he turned to walk back into the White House.

Trump went to Walter Reed late Friday afternoon, a move the White House said was done out of an abundance of caution. He spent several days at the hospital receiving treatment for COVID-19 and left on Monday. 

White House physician Sean Conley told reporters on Monday that Trump was healthy enough to leave the hospital, citing his vitals and clinical evaluations. But he acknowledged that the president, who is 74 and overweight and thus at risk for severe complications, was not out of the woods yet. 

Collins, however, added that she was “shocked” Trump was discharged from the hospital so quickly.  

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Maskless Trump set a poor example at White House

BANGOR, Maine (AP) — Republican Sen. Susan Collins said Tuesday she was “shocked” to see President Donald Trump discharged from the hospital so soon, and said Trump set a poor example by appearing at the White House without a mask.



Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, speaks at a news conference, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, in Waterville, Maine. Collins, who is seeking re-election, visited businesses on a campaign swing through downtown Waterville. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)


© Provided by Associated Press
Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, speaks at a news conference, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, in Waterville, Maine. Collins, who is seeking re-election, visited businesses on a campaign swing through downtown Waterville. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

“When I saw him on the balcony of the White House, taking off his mask, I couldn’t help but think that he sent the wrong signal, given that he’s infected with COVID-19 and that there are many people in his immediate circle who have the virus,” she said. “I did not think that was a good example at all.”

The White House is now a coronavirus hotspot, with both the president and first lady having contracted the virus, along with others in their inner circle.

Collins, who has been critical of Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic before, calling his performance “extremely uneven.”

She’s running against Democrat Sara Gideon, the Maine House speaker, in one of the most competitive senate races in the country — one of a handful that could decide whether Republicans keep control of the U.S. Senate. It’s the costliest political race in state history.

Collins is seeking to persuade voters who oppose Trump to stick with her. Collins has not said whether or not she’ll cast her ballot for the president. She says she didn’t vote for him in 2016.

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Kamala Harris and Mike Pence Set to Debate as Virus Spreads at White House

(Bloomberg) — Mike Pence and Kamala Harris will take the stage Wednesday night under extraordinary circumstances that will elevate the oft-forgotten vice presidential debate to the highest-stakes running mate matchup in years.

With President Donald Trump fresh out of the hospital but still battling the coronavirus, both Pence and Harris will have to reassure voters that they can step into the presidency if either of the septuagenarians who top the tickets become incapacitated.

A week after Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden squared off in a combative and chaotic debate, Pence and Harris will meet at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City under dramatically different circumstances. Not only have the safety precautions become stricter since at least 10 people who live or work at the White House have become infected, but the tone is expected to be more civil as well.



Mike Pence, Kamala Harris are posing for a picture: Pence Harris duo


© Source: Bloomberg
Pence Harris duo

Mike Pence and Kamala Harris

Source: Bloomberg

The debate will be divided into nine discussion categories, each lasting about 10 minutes.

Although the Trump campaign opposed it, Harris’s staff won an argument to have a plexiglass shield separating her and Pence, who has tested negative for the virus that sent Trump to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for three days. The candidates will be a little more than 12 feet (3.7 meters) apart, and the moderator, Susan Page of USA Today, will also be that distance, the Commission on Presidential Debates said Monday.

Read More: Pence Urges Trump’s Re-Election With Law-and-Order Battle Cry

Anyone who refuses to wear a mask will be “escorted out,” the commission said. The first family and some of Trump’s guests refused to wear masks at last week’s debate.

“This VP debate will get a lot more attention than they usually do,” said Charlie Black, a veteran Republican strategist. “So it’s an opportunity for both candidates. I actually expect a good debate. Pence does a good job of presenting the president’s case, his accomplishments and his ideas in a calm, measured manner. Harris has proved to be a good debater.”

The candidates are also less likely to sling the ad hominem attacks that highlighted the Sept. 29 debate in Cleveland between Trump and Biden. Harris will have to restrain the punches she used in her own presidential run.

She has re-upped some of her lines since joining the Biden ticket, including calling Trump a “predator.” But with the president just a day or so out of the hospital, she is expected to shelve those attacks. That doesn’t mean she’ll hold back on criticizing the administration for what Democrats say is a gross mismanagement of the pandemic, especially given that Pence leads the White House coronavirus task force.

“It’s the perfect microcosm for the failure of the Trump administration on coronavirus,” Democratic strategist Joel Payne said. “They became their own super spreader. They didn’t follow best practices. Harris can really effectively use this last week as exhibit A of why Trump and Pence are dangerous and

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20,000 empty chairs set up outside White House on COVID-19 Remembrance Day

Nearly 210,000 lives have been lost to the coronavirus in the United States, and on Sunday, the first National COVID-19 Remembrance Day, a powerful installation was set up outside the White House to represent the toll the pandemic has taken on the nation. Twenty-thousand empty chairs were lined up on the Ellipse, a large lawn outside of the White House. Each one stands for 10 lives lost to COVID-19.

The organization COVID Survivors for Change set up the chairs and also live-streamed a program of “advocacy, art and real people’s stories.” The event was hosted by Grammy Award-winner and former U.S. Ambassador for Health Dionne Warwick, CBS affiliate WUSA reports.

Speakers included family members of those who have died from COVID-19, as well as survivors and frontline workers. 

20,000 Empty Chairs Placed Near White House To Remember 200,000 Lives Lost To COVID-19
20,000 empty chairs were set up outside the White House on Oct. 4, 2020, each representing 10 Americans who have died from COVID-19.

TASOS KATOPODIS / Getty Images


One of the speakers was Konah Bernard, whose mother, Dr. Maima Darbah Fahnbulleh, died from COVID-19 after contracting the virus in a nursing home in May, WUSA reports.

Bernard also shared her 73-year-old mother’s story with WUSA’s Jess Arnold, and described the day she had to say goodbye to her mom over Zoom. “I remember that dreadful morning,” Bernard said. “Time just stopped.”

Dr. Fahnbulleh, who was born in Liberia, “was a very vibrant person,” Bernard said. She received her Ph.D. in social work from Howard University, and had masters degrees in social work and public health, WUSA reported. 

“She spent most of her life advocating for people with disabilities, speaking for the disenfranchised and the people who didn’t really have a voice,” her daughter said.

The installation of 20,000 empty chairs was meant to serve as a wake-up call to the White House, WUSA reports. The event organizers and speakers like Bernard want the government to develop a national plan for safety and recovery. 

20,000 Empty Chairs Placed Near White House To Remember 200,000 Lives Lost To COVID-19
Empty chairs representing the 200,000 lives lost due to the coronavirus pandemic are set up for National COVID-19 Remembrance Day on the Ellipse behind the White House on October 4, 2020 in Washington, D.C.

TASOS KATOPODIS / Getty Images


“I think education and consistency is the main thing,” Bernard said. 

CBS News has reached out to COVID Survivors for Change for more information and is awaiting response. 

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Swiggy’s cloud kitchen model is set to transform dining

When food delivery startup Swiggy started cloud kitchens three years ago, it was a sideshow in its food delivery business. The concept caught on as restaurant brands that had a following in one area could expand easily into new localities or even other cities. Investment in real estate was reduced because these kitchens could be smaller and didn’t need premium locations, apart from doing away with seating and the staff for serving.

Various models arose. Some introduced cloud kitchens in addition to restaurants for expansion, like Chennai’s Buhari becoming available in Coimbatore. Others like Rebel Foods created fully virtual brands that only came from dark kitchens. This became a new real estate and services play as restaurants only had to provide cooking staff while everything else, including cleaning and maintenance, could be outsourced.

Cloud kitchens caught a new impetus after the covid pandemic struck this year. Now even high-end restaurants in luxury hotels resorted to those as eating out took a nosedive and is yet to return to anywhere near the pre-covid levels. For example, Swiggy rolled out a Marriott-on-wheels with menus and prices tailored for delivery at home. Marriott could launch online-only brands whose specs varied from those of its on-premise dining.

“We help create new brands out of the existing kitchens of fine-dining restaurants,” says Vishal Bhatia, CEO, Swiggy New Supply. “For example, a premium restaurant for Chinese cuisine can use the same infrastructure to produce mass Chinese brands. We can help with the catalogue, pricing and discounting for it.”

This helps restaurants find new consumers and partially offset the under-utilization of kitchen facilities and culinary staff. “Everyone’s volumes have dropped and they’re looking for new revenue avenues,” says Bhatia.

Swiggy has co-created nearly 200 brands since the launch of this model using existing kitchens of restaurants in February. It’s too early to say how many restaurants will persist with these if they’re able to restore dining on premises, which gives them far higher margins. What started as a stopgap arrangement could get entrenched as a parallel business.

Plenty of challenges remain. Data analytics is one of the levers of online food delivery catering to mass consumers. “We can match cuisines to gaps in delivery. Then we can plug restaurants to those locations to fill the cuisine gap,” says Bhatia.

But this is still an imperfect science because consumer tastes, behaviours and cultures vary. Besides, the huge number of brands jostling for attention on a food delivery app creates a problem of visibility for all but the best-known brands.

Hygiene is another issue that cloud kitchens will have to address increasingly. The mass consumer may have been blase about this before the pandemic, but covid has raised awareness of cleanliness and what goes into food.

“We have food safety rankings and a checklist for a food safety audit of cloud kitchens. During the pandemic, because the safety team wasn’t able to visit the kitchens, we installed cameras to ensure safety protocols were followed. If the protocol isn’t followed,

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Condo set among treetops beckoned garden-loving couple

“The Colonnade was built in the 1960s and has Old World construction, including solid plaster walls, wood floors and nine-foot-high ceilings,” says Molinaroli, a designer and museum exhibition consultant. “We wanted to play off the traditional classical elements of the apartment with a contemporary kitchen and modern bathrooms. Plus, as a museum designer, I’m interested in setting up spaces to display art and using lighting to direct people’s attention to different features.”

Molinaroli started the design process with two oak columns with their original finish that he has owned since 1978 when they were salvaged from a building in downtown D.C.

“The columns have been with me in every home, so here we used them to frame the living and dining area, which has a nice flow,” he says.

The renovation included replastering the walls to make them level, adding new wide-plank French oak floors, new custom moldings to complement the columns and new windows with electronic shades. A museum-quality lighting system was installed in the ceiling to showcase the couple’s art collection and the grand piano Carabetta, music director of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Georgetown, has recently used to record videos for virtual church services.

The terrace was repaved with bluestone, the kitchen includes European high-glass cabinets and upgraded appliances, and the bathrooms have been renovated with Porcelanosa tile and high-end fixtures such as a soaking tub by Waterworks.

The Colonnade condominium has been famous since it opened in 1966 as home to high-profile Washingtonians, including journalists Rita Braver and Diane Rehm, as well as the late senator Harry F. Byrd Jr. (D-Va.) and descendants of former presidents Roosevelt and Eisenhower.

“Retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor lived above us when we first moved into our condo in 2015,” says Carabetta. “The daughter of the former owner of our condo told us that her parents purchased it from senator Edmund Muskie’s daughter.”

While the interesting neighbors add to the charm of living in the Colonnade, the couple were mostly drawn to the building’s setting on the edge of Glover-Archbold Park and the building amenities.

“We loved our house and especially our garden, so our priority was to find a place with a gardenlike view and a terrace,” says Carabetta. “Now we live at tree level with the birds and every view is of a garden or park. The Colonnade has four major gardens that are well cared for, plus a heated swimming pool and terraces where you can grill and eat outside.”

This two-bedroom, three-bathroom condo has 1,600 square feet and is listed at $1.19 million. The monthly condo fee of $2,060 per month covers all utilities including gas, water, electricity, Internet access and cable TV.

2801 NEW MEXICO AVE. NW #408, WASHINGTON, D.C.

Features: Erected in the 1960s, the condo has solid plaster walls, wood floors and nine-foot-high ceilings. The living and dining area are framed by two oak columns that came from a downtown building. The renovation included replastering the walls to make them

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