State Farm teams up with Scarborough Fire Department to serve up kitchen safety

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and State Farm agent Michelle Raber are teaming up with the Scarborough Fire Department to support Fire Prevention Week, an annual public awareness campaign promoting home fire safety.

State Farm agents are delivering Fire Prevention Week toolkits to more than 2,500 fire departments across the country, including Scarborough. Each toolkit includes resources for Fire Prevention Week, taking place Oct. 4-10, including brochures, magnets, posters and more. The Fire Department will be sharing these resources with schools and communities this fall in support of the campaign.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen” focuses on cooking fire safety. Home cooking fires represent the leading cause of all fires with nearly half – 49 percent – happening in the kitchen. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of these fires.

“The good news is that the majority of kitchen fires are highly preventable,” said State Farm agent Michelle Raber. “These great kits will help our fire departments spread the news to always stay focused when you’re in the kitchen and never leave the kitchen unattended.”

Key messages around this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign will include the following:

• Keep a close eye on what you’re cooking; never leave cooking unattended

• Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — at least three feet away from your stovetop.

• Be on alert. If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.

For more information about Fire Prevention Week and this year’s theme, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen,” visit fpw.org.


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St. Anthony’s Soup Kitchen in Skowhegan creatively continues to serve the community

SKOWHEGAN — The cars continue to line up and roll through, while others walk up wearing masks.

The images of this weekly labor of love look different than they did just eight months ago, but it’s Thursday night, which means a free dinner is available to all who need one thanks to the volunteers at St. Anthony’s Soup Kitchen in Skowhegan.

“It’s going well. Our numbers increase every week,” said Aldea LeBlanc, coordinator of the kitchen.

St. Anthony’s Soup Kitchen, located in the parish hall of Notre Dame de Lourdes Church on Water Street, offered a free, sit-down, hot meal for anyone in need every Thursday night prior to the start of the pandemic in March. The ministry is entirely volunteer run.

“The meals were suspended until early June when the soup kitchen resumed again,” said Nora Natale, office manager at Christ the King Parish, of which the soup kitchen is a part. “Most of the crew was more than ready to see our guests again.”

“The need is so great here,” said Fr. James Nadeau, pastor of Christ the King Parish.

The diners are currently not allowed in the parish hall due to the pandemic, but nobody involved was willing to give up this important ministry that has helped thousands of community members through the years.

Now, volunteers wear masks and practice social distancing, the meals are served in a drive-thru format in the parking lot of the church and other recipients participate through take-out service.

While the delivery methods have changed, what has not is the appeal of the meals, which have included pork chops, barbecue chicken, and many other delectable choices.

“We also provide a vegetable and fruit of some kind, as well as donated desserts and bread,” said Aldea. “The meals are served from 4:30 to 5 p.m. to anyone who comes.”

Established in 1991, the soup kitchen shut down briefly in 2017 while the parish sought funding and someone to lead it. 

Aldea stepped forward, along with Steve Watrous, and the kitchen began serving meals again in November 2018.

Patrons not only come from Skowhegan but from surrounding communities such as Athens, Bingham and Canaan.

The soup kitchen is funded through several sources, including donors as well as partners like the Good Shepherd Food Bank in Auburn and The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP). Additionally, Walmart provides a $50 gift card each month, which is used to buy food or supplies, and Hannaford donates food for the meals, as well as bread for the guests to take home.

“If there is any food left over, it gets donated to a homeless shelter in Skowhegan,” said Aldea.

Like many ministries, St. Anthony’s has been diligently planning for the colder months ahead.

“There are two separate doors to the kitchen. One of our ideas is to have people come one at a time to pick up their food from one door and exit the other door,” said Aldea. “They could tell the volunteers what items they want

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Fire Prevention Week, “serve up fire safety in the kitchen”

This week is Fire Prevention Week, and this year’s campaign slogan is “serve up fire safety in the kitchen.”

The Kern County Fire Department is teaming up with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week for more than 90 years.

The campaign aims to educate everyone about simple but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe.

And according to NFPA cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries in the U.S.

KCFD wants to encourage all residents to embrace the 2020 Fire Prevention Week theme.

Safety tips to avoid starting a fire:

  • Never leave cooking food unattended.
  • Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, or boiling. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove.
  • If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.
  • You have to be alert when cooking. You won’t be alert if you are sleepy, have taken medicine or drugs, or consumed alcohol that makes you drowsy.
  • Always keep an oven mitt and pan lid nearby when you’re cooking. If a small grease fire starts, slide the lid over the pan to smother the flame. Turn off the burner, and leave the pan covered until it is completely cool.
  • Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.

To find out more about Fire Prevention Week programs and activities, visit the Kern County Fire Department website.

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Serve up fire safety in the kitchen

The Scarborough Fire Department is teaming up with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week for more than 90 years, to promote this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!” The campaign is designed to educate everyone about simple but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe.

According to the NFPA, cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries in the United States. Almost half (44 percent) of reported home fires started in the kitchen. Two-thirds (66 percent) of home cooking fires start with the ignition of food or other cooking materials.

The Scarborough Fire Department encourages all residents to embrace the 2020 Fire Prevention Week theme. The most important step you should take before making a meal is to Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!  A cooking fire can grow quickly. We have seen many homes damaged and people injured by fires that could easily have been prevented.

The Scarborough Fire Department would like to share the following safety tips to keep you from having a cooking fire:

Never leave cooking food unattended. Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling or broiling. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove.

If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.

You have to be alert when cooking. You won’t be alert if you are sleepy, have taken medication, or consumed alcohol that makes you drowsy.

Always keep an oven mitt and pan lid nearby when you’re cooking. If a small grease fire starts, slide the lid over the pan to smother the flame. Turn off the burner, and leave the pan covered until it is completely cool.

Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.

The Scarborough Fire Department also wants to remind all residents to remember the following:

• Check your smoke and carbon monoxide alarms

• Have a home fire escape plan and practice it

• As winter approaches maintain heating appliances in a safe manner

• Be vigilant around candles and open flames

The Scarborough Fire Department has been forced to change its usual fire prevention activities this year due to COVID-19. Instead of in-person visits we are creating a public education video that we are planning to share with our school department, child-care providers, and add on our social media platforms. Along with the video we are also putting together educational packets that will be distributed to K-2 schools and our pre-schools. Unfortunately, we are not able to conduct open house activities at our stations this year, but we look forward to a time in the future when we can get back to normal fire prevention and public outreach activities.

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State Farm teams up with Saco Fire Department to serve up kitchen safety

SACO — The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and State Farm Agent Peg Poulin are teaming up with the Saco Fire Department to support Fire Prevention Week, an annual public awareness campaign promoting home fire safety.

State Farm Agents are delivering Fire Prevention Week toolkits to more than 2500 fire departments across the country, including Saco. Each toolkit includes resources for Fire Prevention Week — which takes place Oct. 4-10 — including brochures, magnets, posters and more. The Fire Department will be sharing these resources with schools and communities this fall in support of the campaign.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen” focuses on cooking fire safety. Home cooking fires represent the leading cause of all fires with nearly half — 49 percent — happening in the kitchen. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of these fires.

“The good news is that the majority of kitchen fires are highly preventable,” said State Farm Agent Peg Poulin. “These great kits will help our fire departments spread the news to always stay focused when you’re in the kitchen and never leave the kitchen unattended.”

Key messages around this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign will include the following:

• Keep a close eye on what you’re cooking; never leave cooking unattended

• Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — at least three feet away from your stovetop.

• Be on alert. If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.

For more information about Fire Prevention Week and this year’s theme, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen,” visit fpw.org.

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Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen > United States Marine Corps Flagship > News Display

The Fire Prevention team is cooking up some excitement for Fire Prevention Week 2020, themed “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!” aboard Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow, California, October 4 – 10.

The goal of Fire Prevention Week is to involve people, children and adults alike, to learn how to stay safe in case of a fire.

“Firefighters provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires,” said Michelle Bledsoe, fire prevention officer on base.

This year the focus is on preventable fires and injuries that happen while cooking in one’s kitchen or while barbequing in their yard.

“During 2014 – 2018, local fire departments responded to approximately 172,900 home cooking fires per year,” said Paul Aguilar, fire prevention officer aboard MCLB Barstow. “These fires caused an average of 550 civilian deaths; 4,820 civilian injuries; and $1.2 billion in direct property damage annually. Cooking caused almost half of the reported home fires, 49 percent, and home fire injuries, 44 percent, and one in five home fire deaths, 21 percent. Cooking was the leading cause of reported home fires and home fire injuries and the second leading cause of home fire deaths.”

One of the things that makes cooking such a hazard is indeed the fire or hot surface itself. However, in many cases, it is human error, negligence or complacency which is the root cause of the disaster. So, it’s important for families to learn and teach proper kitchen safety etiquette.

“One common cooking related injury is caused by introducing frozen foods to hot grease or oil,” said Greg Kunkel, Emergency Medical Services chief on base. “Typically, when ice melts it turns to water then to a vapor. When frozen foods are dropped into the hot oil, it causes what is called ‘sublimation,’ which means it skips the water stage and goes straight from solid to vapor, suddenly and violently causing mini explosion. The expansion rate of the ice to gas is crazy! It expands at a factor of 1,600. So, those mini explosions the oil to pop and spray, potentially burning the cook.”

“Cooking is such a routine activity that it is easy to forget that the high temperatures used can easily start a fire,” said Nicholas Llewellyn, fire prevention officer aboard MCLB Barstow. “Sometimes people become complacent and leave items unattended. Sometimes, especially during holidays, sporting events, or other activities, it can be easy to get distracted. For example, home fires caused by cooking peak during Thanksgiving and Christmas when people may be cooking more than usual, but may also be distracted by visiting family members and friends. Always be attentive to what’s cooking and never leave any items on the stove or oven unattended.”

 “Firefighters provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires.” Michelle Bledsoe, base fire prevention officer

The type of clothing worn while cooking can also make the difference between slight discomfort, versus a full on 3rd degree burn.

“Be

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DVIDS – News – Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen


The Fire Prevention team is cooking up some excitement for Fire Prevention Week 2020, themed “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!” aboard Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow, California Oct. 4 – 10.

The goal of Fire Prevention Week is to involve people, children and adults alike, to learn how to stay safe in case of a fire.

“Firefighters provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires,” Bledsoe said.

This year the focus is on preventable fires and injuries that happen while cooking in one’s kitchen or while barbequing in their yard.

“During 2014 – 2018, local fire departments responded to approximately 172,900 home cooking fires per year,” said Paul Aguilar, fire prevention officer aboard MCLB Barstow. “These fires caused an average of 550 civilian deaths; 4,820 civilian injuries; and $1.2 billion in direct property damage annually. Cooking caused almost half of the reported home fires (49 percent) and home fire injuries (44 percent) and one in five home fire deaths (21 percent). Cooking was the leading cause of reported home fires and home fire injuries and the second leading cause of home fire deaths.”

One of the things that makes cooking such a hazard is indeed the fire or hot surface itself. However, in many cases, it is human error, negligence or complacency which is the root cause of the disaster.So, it’s important for families to learn and teach proper kitchen safety etiquette.

“One common cooking related injury is caused by introducing frozen foods to hot grease or oil,” said Greg Kunkel, Emergency Medical Services chief on base. “Typically, when ice melts it turns to water then to a vapor. When frozen foods are dropped into the hot oil, it causes what is called ‘sublimation,’ which means it skips the water stage and goes straight from solid to vapor, suddenly and violently causing mini explosion. The expansion rate of the ice to gas is crazy! It expands at a factor of 1,600. So, those mini explosions the oil to pop and spray, potentially burning the cook.”

“Cooking is such a routine activity that it is easy to forget that the high temperatures used can easily start a fire,” said Nicholas Llewellyn, fire prevention officer aboard MCLB Barstow. “Sometimes people become complacent and leave items unattended. Sometimes, especially during holidays, sporting events, or other activities, it can be easy to get distracted. For example, home fires caused by cooking peak during Thanksgiving and Christmas when people may be cooking more than usual, but may also be distracted by visiting family members and friends. Always be attentive to what’s cooking and never leave any items on the stove or oven unattended.”

The type of clothing worn while cooking can also make the difference between slight discomfort, versus a full on 3rd degree burn.

“Be careful not to wear long, loosely fitting sleeves, for instance, which can catch fire over an open flame,” Kunkel warned. “Also be diligent when young children are around the kitchen.

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Why Your House Must SERVE Your Needs?

Before one considers, buying, a home of their own, they must, objectively, introspectively, think about, both, what you, truly need, as well as what you wish for / desire, and your personal reasons and rationale! While some want a big home, with a lot of land, others may not want, the responsibility of maintaining such a large property. Examine your personal comfort zone, and determine, how large, monthly payments, will make you feel. Examine, your present resources / funds / assets, and, whether, you feel, you have a good degree of job, and income security. Are you considering, relocating, in the next 5 years, or, looking, to settle – in, and live, in a specific neighborhood / region / area, for the longer – run? Give yourself, a check – up, from the neck – up, and consider, what might best SERVE your personal needs, lifestyle, and interests. With that in mind, this article will attempt to, briefly, consider, examine, review, and discuss, using the mnemonic approach, what this means and represents, and why it's an important consideration / factor.

1. Size; solutions; systems; services; strengths: What size house, do you need, and what do you want / hope for? Does a specific house, provide the solutions, you seek? Which of the house's internal systems, meet your objectives, etc? Do the strengths of a house, outweigh potential weaknesses, or things, it lacks? Always consider, the services, you seek, need, and desire?

2. Energy efficiency: Many overlook, or fail to pay enough attention, to the overall energy efficiency, of a particular house. Have a professional, building inspector, and / or, engineer, inspect the existing heating, cooling, and electric systems, and, request suggestions, which might, enhance, improve, and make, better, more effective, efficient, and, hopefully, save you money and aggravation!

3. Real estate; relevant; real: Are you ready to own real estate? Consider your decision, seriously, and, thoroughly, because, for most, the value of their house, becomes their single – biggest financial asset! Are you considering a house, which addresses, you personal, relevant, realistic needs, and aspirations? Will you keep, your focus, on your real needs, and financial abilities, both today, and projected, into the future?

4. Value; values; vision: Have your real estate professional, create a meaningful, realistic, Competitive Market Analysis, or, CMA . Consider your true values, and examine your personal vision, in a responsible manner!

5. Emphasis; effects: Consider, your personal emphasis, and reasoning / rationale, and the effects, on what serves your best purposes!

Will the house, you purchase, truly serve your NEEDS? Take this consideration, seriously, because it's an important, major decision!

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