Gatwick knifeman gets suspended sentence after bringing two huge kitchen knives

A knifeman has been given a suspended sentence after brandishing two huge kitchen knives at Gatwick Airport.

Adam Russell, 32, told a neighbour he had planned a ‘massacre’ at the airport and wanted ‘to kill them all’.

Russell, who suffers from schizophrenia, was in the midst of a relapse in his mental illness when he took a bus to Gatwick in the early hours of June 3, 2019.

He was armed with two 10-inch blades, a court heard, and nearly 200 people were evacuated from in the South Terminal as Russell headed towards the international departure lounge.

Armed police arrived two minutes after security staff pressed the panic button and officers tasered Russell before arresting him. 

Adam Russell (pictured with two large kitchen knives), 32, told a neighbour he had planned a 'massacre' at Gatwick Airport and wanted 'to kill them all'

Adam Russell (pictured with two large kitchen knives), 32, told a neighbour he had planned a ‘massacre’ at Gatwick Airport and wanted ‘to kill them all’

Russell, from Crawley in West Sussex, pleaded guilty to possessing a bladed article and affray. He appeared at Lewes Crown Court for sentencing on Tuesday afternoon.

Prosecutor Rachel Beckett said Russell was seen by one of his neighbours about 1.30am while they both waited for a bus.

She told the court: ‘The defendant said he was going for a massacre at Gatwick.

‘He later said he was going to kill them all.’

Russell arrived at the airport and was seen walking into the arrivals hall, carrying a knife in each hand.

One witness said the defendant was ‘walking with purpose in his stride’ and had ‘an emotionless glazed over look in his face’.

Russell (pictured), who suffers from schizophrenia, was in the midst of a relapse in his mental illness when he took a bus to Gatwick in the early hours of June 3, 2019

Russell (pictured), who suffers from schizophrenia, was in the midst of a relapse in his mental illness when he took a bus to Gatwick in the early hours of June 3, 2019

Another said Russell looked ‘like he was on a mission’.

As onlookers realised the danger they started shouting and running, with security staff ushering people away.

Russell was heard shouting ‘come on then’ as he continued to hold the knives.

The prosecutor added: ‘(A) security officer said she was so scared when she saw the defendant she was scared he was about to start stabbing everyone.

‘She thought “this is it, this is a terrorist attack”.’

Staff pressed the panic button at 1.54am and armed police arrived in the area at 1.55am.

Officers armed with a carbine and handguns found the defendant and shouted at him to show them his hands.

Armed officers tasered Russell before arresting him after he walked through Gatwick Airport's security area with two large knives

Armed officers tasered Russell before arresting him after he walked through Gatwick Airport’s security area with two large knives

They formed the view that he was ‘aggressive and an immediate danger’ and tasered him in the chest.

After he was apprehended, he told officers that he suffered from schizophrenia.

The court heard that a week before the Gatwick incident he had told ambulance staff that voices in his head were telling him to blow up the airport.

Defence barrister Fiona Clegg said: ‘What is very clear is that in the proceeding weeks to the incident that his mental health was deteriorating significantly.

Read more

Former Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard reports to jail to start prison sentence

Former Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard reported this afternoon to the Lee County sheriff’s office in Opelika to begin his prison sentence.

Hubbard turned himself in at 5:05 p.m., the online jail log shows.

Lance Bell, an attorney for Hubbard, said Hubbard was taken to the Russell County jail in Phenix City, where he is being held.

The Alabama Supreme Court denied Hubbard’s request for a rehearing two weeks ago, exhausting his state appeals.

Hubbard, 58, was sentenced to four years in prison in 2016 for violating the state ethics law. He has been out on appeal since.

Bell released a brief statement this evening.

“Mike Hubbard is a strong Christian man and has accepted the current situation but firmly believes in his innocence and looks forward to exploring other options to clear his name,” Bell said.

Joel Dillard, another lawyer for Hubbard, had said two weeks ago that the defense team would recommend that Hubbard file a federal appeal.

When the state Supreme Court turned down Hubbard’s request for a rehearing on August 28, the attorney general’s office said that left him with 15 days to report to jail to be turned over to the Department of Corrections.

A Lee County jury convicted Hubbard of 12 ethics violations. The Alabama Court of Criminal Appeals upheld 11 of the 12. The Alabama Supreme Court affirmed six of the 11 and overturned five.

Hubbard was one of Alabama’s most powerful politicians until his conviction, which automatically removed him from office.

Related: 6-year saga: Timeline of Mike Hubbard’s ethics case

Prosecutors said Hubbard used his public office to enrich himself, partly through consulting contracts.

Hubbard has maintained his innocence since his indictment in 2014 and said the transactions that led to the charges were normal business activities not related to his public office. He testified for three days during his 2016 trial.

The six convictions involved consulting contracts with three companies that paid Hubbard a total of $525,000 while he was speaker, from 2012 to 2014.

Lee County voters first elected Hubbard to the House of Representatives in 1998, a time when Democrats controlled the Legislature. They would elect him to four more four-year terms.

Hubbard became state Republican Party chair and in 2010 helped orchestrate a campaign in which the GOP took control of the Legislature for the first time in 136 years. Hubbard’s House colleagues elected him speaker, a position he retained until his conviction in 2016.

Shortly after the 2010 election, the new Republican-controlled Legislature met in a special session to put tighter restrictions in the state ethics law, fulfilling a campaign promise.

Hubbard was convicted under the enhanced law that he helped pass.

The former speaker has maintained his innocence since his indictment by a Lee County special grand jury in 2014, which led to his trial two years later.

This story was updated at 3:03 p.m. on Sept. 12 to say that Hubbard is being held at the Russell County jail in Phenix City.

Source A

Read more

Alabama Ex-House speaker reports to begin prison sentence



FILE - In this Friday, Sept. 2, 2016 file photo, Mike Hubbard, former Alabama Speaker of the House, and his wife, Susan, arrive for a post trial hearing at the Lee County Justice Center in Opelika, Ala..  Mike Hubbard reported Friday, Sept. 11, 2020 to a county detention center to begin the sentence after an  unsuccessful effort to overturn his conviction. (Albert Cesare/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP, Pool)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Friday, Sept. 2, 2016 file photo, Mike Hubbard, former Alabama Speaker of the House, and his wife, Susan, arrive for a post trial hearing at the Lee County Justice Center in Opelika, Ala.. Mike Hubbard reported Friday, Sept. 11, 2020 to a county detention center to begin the sentence after an unsuccessful effort to overturn his conviction. (Albert Cesare/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP, Pool)

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Former Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard, for years once of the state’s most influential politicians, reported to jail Friday to begin a prison sentence for his 2016 ethics conviction.

Hubbard reported to the Lee County Detention Center in Opelika, according to jail records, to begin his four-year sentence. The Auburn Republican was for years one of the state’s most powerful politicians until the ethics conviction in a corruption case ended his political career.

Prosecutors accused Hubbard of leveraging his powerful public office to obtain clients and investments for his businesses. His defense lawyers maintained the transactions were all aboveboard.

“Mike Hubbard is a strong Christian man and has accepted the current situation but firmly believes in his innocence and looks forward to exploring other options to clear his name,” attorney Lance Bell said.

A jury in 2016 convicted Hubbard of 12 counts of violating the state ethics law, but six were overturned on appeal. The Alabama Supreme Court last month refused to reconsider the case.

The Alabama attorney general’s office said Hubbard had until Saturday to report to the jail to be processed and turned over to the Department of Corrections.

He had been free on appeal since his 2016 conviction as he unsuccessfully fought to completely overturn his conviction.

Attorney David McKnight said they are considering additional appeals or asking a judge to reduce his sentence since some counts have been overturned.

Hubbard, the architect of the GOP’s takeover of the Alabama Legislature in 2010, was a legislator from Auburn and former chairman of the Alabama Republican Party. He was elected House speaker soon after the Republicans won control of both legislative chambers.

Hubbard was automatically removed from office after his 2016 felony conviction.

Source Article

Read more