“Cook Like a Firefighter” competition raises awareness about kitchen fire safety

Fire departments across Arizona come together to raise money for the Arizona Burn Foundation.

PHOENIX — Firefighters across Arizona are pulling out all the stops for a big cook-off competition called “Cook Like a Firefighter.”

It’s not just about culinary skills, it’s to raise awareness about kitchen fire safety.

“We invited all of the fire departments across the state of Arizona,” said Mik Milem, Chief Operations Officer at the Arizona Burn Foundation, an organization working to help burn survivors and their families and raise awareness about fire safety.

While a lot of their regular community events are on hold due to COVID-19, they decided to improvise.

“We came up with this idea of doing a ‘cook like a firefighter’ competition,” he said.

The competition, a fun and mouth-watering way to get the community involved and educated on kitchen fire safety, shows support for the state firefighters.

Each department put together their favorite station staple recipe to show off and fight for the prize.

More than a dozen fire departments jumped on board and they had a lot of fun filming in the kitchen, cooking up tasty dishes.

“We told them, be fun but also put some fire safety and cooking safety instructions in there… firefighters lived up to that challenge,” said Milem.

Firefighters made everything from simple pancakes to tri-tip sandwiches.

“Energy balls, I think there’s two different kinds of burgers,” he said.

It’s easy to get involved and vote for your favorite recipe too, by donating to the Arizona Burn Foundation.

“All the money goes back to the fire departments by providing them free smoke alarms and free children’s education programing for them to go out into the community with,” he said.

The event is based on learning new recipes while providing necessary safety tips.

“To help prevent injuries from ever taking place,” he said.

To check out the recipes and vote for your favorite, visit the competition website.

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Clintons wish Trumps speedy recovery, hopes for safety of White House staff and Secret Service

Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonICE launching billboard campaign highlighting ‘at-large immigration violators’ Congress can’t stop QAnon but combatting abuse and trauma can Majority of Americans concerned about potential foreign election interference: poll MORE on Friday night sent wishes of a speedy recovery to her 2016 opponent President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump campaign manager tests positive for COVID-19 Trump given Remdesivir as treatment for COVID-19 infection ICE launching billboard campaign highlighting ‘at-large immigration violators’ MORE and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpTrump given Remdesivir as treatment for COVID-19 infection Kellyanne Conway tests positive for COVID-19 Trump to Woodward in April: I’m ‘just not’ worried about contracting COVID-19 MORE after their coronavirus diagnosis, as well as hopes “for the safety of the White House staff, the Secret Service, and others putting their lives on the line.”

“This pandemic has affected so many. We must continue to protect ourselves, our families, and communities,” wrote the former first lady and her husband, former President Bill ClintonWilliam (Bill) Jefferson ClintonArizona Mirror editor says changing demographics could shift battleground state in Biden’s favor Clinton says debate made her worry ‘what the next month is going to be like’ New poll finds Biden narrowly leading Trump in Georgia MORE.

The Trumps revealed their coronavirus diagnosis early Friday morning, sending a shock through Washington and the rest of the world.

In the afternoon, Trump traveled to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center where he will remain “for the next few days. White House officials have said that Trump’s symptoms are mild and he remains in good spirits.

The announcement came after news broke that White House adviser and top aide to the president Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksTrump campaign manager tests positive for COVID-19 Trump given Remdesivir as treatment for COVID-19 infection Kellyanne Conway tests positive for COVID-19 MORE tested positive for the disease

Both Hicks and the president had been together on Air Force One in Cleveland for the presidential debate as well as a campaign rally in Minnesota on Wednesday.

Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayTrump given Remdesivir as treatment for COVID-19 infection Kellyanne Conway tests positive for COVID-19 Special counsel investigating DeVos for potential Hatch Act violation: report MORE, Trump’s former longtime adviser, also tested positive for COVID-19 on Friday.

Last Saturday, Conway attended a ceremony in the Rose Garden at the White

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Honolulu Fire Department Chief Manuel Neves gives kitchen safety tips for fire prevention week

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White House announces no changes to safety procedures after Trump positive COVID-19 test

The White House said Friday it will continue following the coronavirus safety procedures it already has in place after President TrumpDonald John TrumpPresident Trump, Melania Trump test positive for COVID-19 Trump, first lady to quarantine after top aide tests positive for coronavirus Secret recordings show Melania Trump was frustrated about criticism of Trump 2018 border separation policy: CNN MORE tested positive for COVID-19. 

When asked what changes would take place after the president’s diagnosis, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany did not rule out making future changes to existing guidelines but did not announce any changes from existing procedures.

“We put in place safety procedures. The White House Correspondents’ Association has spaces between the chairs, we wear masks in the White House when we can’t socially distance, the president, we make sure we’re always six feet away and we stay away from each other. So we’ll move forward with those same procedures, and we believe that we will protect those here in the White House as we come to work,” McEnany said on Fox News. 

The president announced early Friday that he and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpPresident Trump, Melania Trump test positive for COVID-19 Trump, first lady to quarantine after top aide tests positive for coronavirus Secret recordings show Melania Trump was frustrated about criticism of Trump 2018 border separation policy: CNN MORE had tested positive for COVID-19 and would begin quarantining in the White House “immediately.” He is experiencing mild symptoms, though he has not appeared on camera or made any other public remarks since he announced his diagnosis. Reports have surfaced that he is suffering from a mild fever, and he was taken to Walter Reed Military Medical Center later Friday. 

“President Trump remains in good spirts, has mild symptoms, and has been working throughout the day. Out of an abundance of caution, and at the recommendation of his physician and medical experts, the President will be working from the presidential offices at Walter Reed for the next few days. President Trump appreciates the outpouring of support for both he and the First Lady,” McEnany said in a statement. 

White House senior adviser Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksPresident Trump, Melania Trump test positive for COVID-19 Trump, first lady to quarantine after top aide tests positive for coronavirus Trump aide Hope Hicks tests positive for COVID-19 MORE and Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel have also tested positive for the coronavirus. Vice President Pence, who was last seen with Trump on Monday, tested negative, as did former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPresident Trump, Melania Trump test positive for COVID-19 Poll: Biden notches 7-point lead ahead of Trump in New Hampshire Jim Carrey to make his SNL debut as Joe Biden this week MORE, who debated Trump in Cleveland on Tuesday. McEnany also said on Fox News that she tested negative for the coronavirus.

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Serve up fire safety in the kitchen

The Scarborough Fire Department is teaming up with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week for more than 90 years, to promote this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!” The campaign is designed to educate everyone about simple but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe.

According to the NFPA, cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries in the United States. Almost half (44 percent) of reported home fires started in the kitchen. Two-thirds (66 percent) of home cooking fires start with the ignition of food or other cooking materials.

The Scarborough Fire Department encourages all residents to embrace the 2020 Fire Prevention Week theme. The most important step you should take before making a meal is to Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!  A cooking fire can grow quickly. We have seen many homes damaged and people injured by fires that could easily have been prevented.

The Scarborough Fire Department would like to share the following safety tips to keep you from having a cooking fire:

Never leave cooking food unattended. Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling or broiling. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove.

If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.

You have to be alert when cooking. You won’t be alert if you are sleepy, have taken medication, or consumed alcohol that makes you drowsy.

Always keep an oven mitt and pan lid nearby when you’re cooking. If a small grease fire starts, slide the lid over the pan to smother the flame. Turn off the burner, and leave the pan covered until it is completely cool.

Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.

The Scarborough Fire Department also wants to remind all residents to remember the following:

• Check your smoke and carbon monoxide alarms

• Have a home fire escape plan and practice it

• As winter approaches maintain heating appliances in a safe manner

• Be vigilant around candles and open flames

The Scarborough Fire Department has been forced to change its usual fire prevention activities this year due to COVID-19. Instead of in-person visits we are creating a public education video that we are planning to share with our school department, child-care providers, and add on our social media platforms. Along with the video we are also putting together educational packets that will be distributed to K-2 schools and our pre-schools. Unfortunately, we are not able to conduct open house activities at our stations this year, but we look forward to a time in the future when we can get back to normal fire prevention and public outreach activities.

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Fire Prevention Week focuses on safety in the kitchen

The Mount Prospect -based, nonprofit Illinois Fire Safety Alliance is promoting national Fire Prevention Week and this year’s campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!”

The campaign works to educate everyone about the simple but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

According to the National Fire Protection Association, cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries in the United States. Almost half (44%) of reported home fires started in the kitchen. Two-thirds (66%) of home cooking fires start with the ignition of food or other cooking materials.

“We know cooking fires can be prevented,” said Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice president of outreach and advocacy. “Staying in the kitchen, using a timer, and avoiding distractions such as electronics or TV are steps everyone can take to keep families safe in their homes.”

The IFSA encourages all Illinois residents to embrace the 2020 Fire Prevention Week theme.

“The most important step you should take before making a meal is to ‘Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!'” said Fire Chief Jim Kreher, IFSA president. “A cooking fire can grow quickly. I have seen many homes damaged and people injured by fires that could easily have been prevented.”

Illinois Fire Safety Alliance wants to share safety tips to keep you from having a cooking fire:

• Never leave cooking food unattended. Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, or broiling. If you must leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

• Have a “kid-free zone” of at least three feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.

• Always keep an oven mitt and pan lid nearby when you’re cooking. If a small grease fire starts, slide the lid over the pan to smother the flame. Turn off the burner, and leave the pan covered until it is completely cool.

• If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.

• You have to be alert when cooking. You won’t be alert if you are sleepy, have taken medicine or drugs, or consumed alcohol that makes you drowsy.

The Illinois Fire Safety Alliance will be highlighting many more fire safety tips in support of this year’s Fire Prevention Week on its social media pages. To find out more about Fire Prevention Week and home fire safety tips, visit the following pages:

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

• IFSA Facebook: www.facebook.com/IllinoisFireSafetyAlliance

• IFSA Instagram: www.instagram.com/ilfiresafety

• IFSA Twitter: www.twitter.com/ILFireSafety

Since 1982, the Illinois Fire Safety Alliance, a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization, has been dedicated to fire safety and burn prevention throughout Illinois. The IFSA also hosts burn survivor support programs, including Camp “I Am Me,” a unique weeklong camp

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State Farm teams up with Saco Fire Department to serve up kitchen safety

SACO — The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and State Farm Agent Peg Poulin are teaming up with the Saco Fire Department to support Fire Prevention Week, an annual public awareness campaign promoting home fire safety.

State Farm Agents are delivering Fire Prevention Week toolkits to more than 2500 fire departments across the country, including Saco. Each toolkit includes resources for Fire Prevention Week — which takes place Oct. 4-10 — including brochures, magnets, posters and more. The Fire Department will be sharing these resources with schools and communities this fall in support of the campaign.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen” focuses on cooking fire safety. Home cooking fires represent the leading cause of all fires with nearly half — 49 percent — happening in the kitchen. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of these fires.

“The good news is that the majority of kitchen fires are highly preventable,” said State Farm Agent Peg Poulin. “These great kits will help our fire departments spread the news to always stay focused when you’re in the kitchen and never leave the kitchen unattended.”

Key messages around this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign will include the following:

• Keep a close eye on what you’re cooking; never leave cooking unattended

• Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — at least three feet away from your stovetop.

• Be on alert. If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.

For more information about Fire Prevention Week and this year’s theme, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen,” visit fpw.org.

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U.S. House passes horse racing safety bill

National legislation designed to standardize medication and safety protocols in horse racing passed the House of Representatives with bipartisan support Tuesday. A form of the Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act has been around since 2015, but it never had the traction to make it onto the House floor until this year.



a group of people sitting at a table in front of a fence: Horses run in front of empty stands at Santa Anita Park on March 14. (Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press)


© (Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press)
Horses run in front of empty stands at Santa Anita Park on March 14. (Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press)

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has introduced the same bill in the Senate, although there is no date set for committee markup or a vote. It is expected to pass before the end of the year.

The House bill was introduced by Paul Tonko (D-N.Y.), who represents the area around Saratoga, and Andy Barr (R-Ky.), who represents the area around Keeneland and horse farms near Lexington.

The bill has support from all the major racetrack organizations and animal welfare groups. It is, though, a concept with some broad principles rather than a specific plan to be executed at the state level. Currently, there are 38 different jurisdictions that regulate horse racing.

“[Tuesday’s] historic passage … by an overwhelmingly favorable bipartisan vote reflects broad industry support of much-needed national standards for anti-doping and medication control as well as racetrack safety,” said Alex Waldrop, president and chief executive of the National Thoroughbred Racing Assn.

While the idea is to standardize rules and regulations across the country, there appears to be some room for states to impose their own rules, which would no longer make it a national standard. If horse racing is truly standardized, some jurisdictions may have to relax their regulations.

New Jersey, for example, recently outlawed the use of the riding crop, also called a whip, except in the case of safety. It’s the most strict rule in the country. A new whip rule goes into effect in California on Thursday in which a horse can be struck no more than six times and only in an underhand motion.

The Horsemen’s Benevolent and Protective Assn., which represents around 30,000 owners and trainers, has been the most vocal in its opposition to the bill. Among its objections is the proposed banning of the drug Lasix, which is used to treat exercise-induced bleeding from the lungs. The HBPA contends there have not been enough veterinary studies conducted to justify this move.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) is one of the co-sponsors of the Senate bill, but the California Horse Racing Board has reservations about the bill’s passage. At Thursday’s CHRB meeting, Executive Director Scott Chaney expressed concern over fears that standards could be relaxed or that the highly respected UC Davis laboratory might be shut out of testing if it is taken over by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency as the bill proposes. The board, though has not taken a formal position on the matter.

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Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen > United States Marine Corps Flagship > News Display

The Fire Prevention team is cooking up some excitement for Fire Prevention Week 2020, themed “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!” aboard Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow, California, October 4 – 10.

The goal of Fire Prevention Week is to involve people, children and adults alike, to learn how to stay safe in case of a fire.

“Firefighters provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires,” said Michelle Bledsoe, fire prevention officer on base.

This year the focus is on preventable fires and injuries that happen while cooking in one’s kitchen or while barbequing in their yard.

“During 2014 – 2018, local fire departments responded to approximately 172,900 home cooking fires per year,” said Paul Aguilar, fire prevention officer aboard MCLB Barstow. “These fires caused an average of 550 civilian deaths; 4,820 civilian injuries; and $1.2 billion in direct property damage annually. Cooking caused almost half of the reported home fires, 49 percent, and home fire injuries, 44 percent, and one in five home fire deaths, 21 percent. Cooking was the leading cause of reported home fires and home fire injuries and the second leading cause of home fire deaths.”

One of the things that makes cooking such a hazard is indeed the fire or hot surface itself. However, in many cases, it is human error, negligence or complacency which is the root cause of the disaster. So, it’s important for families to learn and teach proper kitchen safety etiquette.

“One common cooking related injury is caused by introducing frozen foods to hot grease or oil,” said Greg Kunkel, Emergency Medical Services chief on base. “Typically, when ice melts it turns to water then to a vapor. When frozen foods are dropped into the hot oil, it causes what is called ‘sublimation,’ which means it skips the water stage and goes straight from solid to vapor, suddenly and violently causing mini explosion. The expansion rate of the ice to gas is crazy! It expands at a factor of 1,600. So, those mini explosions the oil to pop and spray, potentially burning the cook.”

“Cooking is such a routine activity that it is easy to forget that the high temperatures used can easily start a fire,” said Nicholas Llewellyn, fire prevention officer aboard MCLB Barstow. “Sometimes people become complacent and leave items unattended. Sometimes, especially during holidays, sporting events, or other activities, it can be easy to get distracted. For example, home fires caused by cooking peak during Thanksgiving and Christmas when people may be cooking more than usual, but may also be distracted by visiting family members and friends. Always be attentive to what’s cooking and never leave any items on the stove or oven unattended.”

 “Firefighters provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires.” Michelle Bledsoe, base fire prevention officer

The type of clothing worn while cooking can also make the difference between slight discomfort, versus a full on 3rd degree burn.

“Be

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White House reportedly pushed CDC hard to fall in line on sending kids to school, sought alternate safety data

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began working in early summer on guidance for sending children back to school, and the White House then “spent weeks trying to press public health professionals to fall in line with President Trump’s election-year agenda of pushing to reopen schools and the economy as quickly as possible,” The New York Times reported Monday night, citing documents and interviews with current and former government officials.

This “strikingly political intervention in one of the most sensitive public health debates of the pandemic” included searching for “alternate data” that suggested children were at little or no risk from the coronavirus, the Times reports, and trying to swap in guidance from a little-known Health and Human Services Department agency, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

SAMHSA was focused on the emotional and mental health toll remote school could have on children, but CDC scientists found multiple problems with the agency’s assertion that COVID-19 posed a low health and transmission risk for children. That’s the language the White House was most interested in, though, and throughout the summer the CDC won some battles and lost others trying to keep it out of public guidance, the Times documents.

Olivia Troye, one of Vice President Mike Pence’s envoys on the White House coronavirus task force until leaving the administration in July, told the Times she regrets being “complicit” in the effort to pressure the CDC to make children look safer than the data supported. She said when she tried to shield the CDC, Pence’s chief of staff, Marc Short, charged “more junior staff” to “develop charts” for White House briefings.

In early July, several prominent medical groups, including the American Association of Pediatrics, advised sending kids back to school with stringent safety measures, in part because the data at the time suggested lower risk for kids. “More recently, data compiled by the academy from recent months shows that hospitalizations and deaths from the coronavirus have increased at a faster rate in children and teenagers than among the general public,” the Times reports. Read more at The New York Times.

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