This photo of Hallie Jackson pumping en route to White House embodies working motherhood

Since returning from maternity leave in August, NBC’s chief White House correspondent Hallie Jackson has been very busy at work.

On Saturday, Jackson shared a photo of herself on Instagram on Saturday that many new moms could relate to. In it, she’s using a breast pump while riding in a van with other politics reporters headed to the White House. Learning to pump at work is a predicament many women have had to navigate, and it’s made even more challenging when you need to stick to a breast milk schedule but lack the time or privacy on the job.

“Me, my Spectra, and the White House press corps…” Jackson captioned the photo of herself in the car with her breast pump and a scarf draped over her. “This happened on the way back from Walter Reed Sunday, during the president’s hospitalization, in a van carrying the small group of reporters who travel with the president. It was my turn that day. I hadn’t pumped since 7 that morning, and by the time we set up the live shot at the hospital, held a news conference with the president’s doctors, and then – the dagger – hit traffic on the Beltway, it was 12:30 and now or never.”

Jackson, 36, gave birth to her first child in March, a girl named Monroe. Since then, she’s been pulling back the curtain on what it’s like to be a working, new mom, showing the ups and downs and even bringing her little one on set with her.

“It’s just a picture, but to me it’s a snapshot in time: on day 3 of nonstop coverage, on about 6 hours of sleep total, during one of the most intense weeks in my professional life,” Jackson continued. “Not a day went by this week where I didn’t miss at least one pumping session. All the things you’re supposed to do to keep up your milk supply went out the window: regular removal, hydration, plenty of rest (lololololol) But you know what? It’s okay.”

She went on to explain that she “sure did struggle with guilt and anxiety about the absolute avalanche at work consuming my life. But a little self-compassion goes a long way: I’m doing my best. Most moms are. And it’s going to be okay. I’ve been lucky to be able to lean on a lot of people this week for help, like the women journalists in the press corps who have been through the new-mom crush-of-news wringer before.”

Jackson also gave a shoutout to her husband and Monroe’s father, Frank Thorp, who is a producer at NBC News.

“I’m lucky to have Frank, who ended the week as exhausted as me. Home full-time with Ro right now, he cooked breakfast in the morning, did tummy time in the afternoon, and baked cookies for dinner after I finally collapsed through the door at night. He picked up my slack, and my mess. And he cheered me on every minute of our

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Obama departs White House en route to Allentown, Pennsylvania

Valerie Jarrett, Assistant to the President for Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs; David Axelrod, Senior Advisor to the President; Bill Burton, Deputy Press Secretary; and Cody Keenan, Speechwriter; (L to R) walk to Marine 1 on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington to accompany United States President Barack Obama to Allentown, Pennsylvania on December 4, 2009 to discuss jobs and the economy before returning late in the afternoon. UPI/Ron Sachs/POOL

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This Japanese Vegetable Grater Is My Quickest Route to Dinner

Healthyish Loves It is our weekly column where we tell you about the stuff we can’t live without. See our past recommendations here!

When I first moved out of my parent’s home and into my own apartment, it was easy to remember to buy a rice cooker and a chef’s knife. But when I tried to make the Japanese dishes I grew up eating, I began to realize all the small but essential tools that were missing in my new kitchen: bamboo cooking chopsticks, a rice paddle, and, of course, a grater.

Almost every Japanese household has a vegetable grater. This is because Japanese cooking often uses oroshi-mono, which directly translates to “something grated.” Raw grated ginger is often served on the side of grilled vegetables or tempura, and raw grated daikon commonly tops wafū burgers or fried fish. Both are also served as a side to soba noodles or udon noodles, as they are the perfect way to add spice and to freshen up something a bit salty or fatty: Daikon is high in vitamin C and helps metabolize fats, and ginger is anti-inflammatory, making heavier foods much less stressful on our stomachs.

The best vegetable graters look a bit different from those used for cheese. They should lie flat, so you can grate perpendicular to the table with stability, and they should have a container on the bottom to capture the vegetable and easily transfer it to dishes.

Raw grated vegetables add an additional layer of texture like a condiment or sauce would, allowing me to incorporate the fresh flavor of whole foods without the space and clean-up that a food processor requires, or time and skill of slicing and chopping with a knife. If I find that I have some extra daikon or nagaimo yam in my fridge, I just grate them and serve it on the side of whatever I’m cooking that night. If I have some carrots or tomatoes close to spoiling, I grate them and toss them into a stew or curry to add a natural sweetness and thickness. Although it doesn’t take up counter space like a rice cooker or knife’s block, this small and simple tool is one I can’t imagine my kitchen without.

Image may contain: Plant, Food, Vegetable, Carrot, Human, and Person

Non Slip Quick Radish Grater

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Opinion | There Is No Route to the White House Without Latino Voters

This year, a projected 32 million Latinos will be eligible to vote, making them the largest racial or ethnic minority ever to participate in a presidential election. And for the first time, Latinos will outnumber Black voters, according to the Pew Research Center.

The power of Latino voters is evident in states such as Florida and Arizona. Had the Latino turnout been higher in those states in 2016, Mr. Trump might not be president. But over half of all Latinos eligible to vote didn’t do so, and consequently history was written in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Despite the racist insults he hurled at Mexican immigrants during his last campaign (“They are bringing drugs. They are bringing crime. They’re rapists.”) Mr. Trump won 28 percent of the Latino vote. Though not even close to the 66 percent that voted for Hillary Clinton, it was enough to win him the election. Clearly, even insults couldn’t convince that small slice of the Latino electorate that Mr. Trump, who promised economic opportunity, a wall and a crackdown on dictatorships in Cuba and Venezuela, was unfit for office.

I myself have surfed the great Latino wave. When I arrived in the United States in the early 1980s, fewer than 15 million Latinos lived in this country; now we number more than 60 million. And in less than three decades we will be at 100 million, according to estimates.

These numbers mean no candidate will be able to achieve power in the United States without Latino support. Karl Rove, chief adviser to President George W. Bush, understood this perfectly. In 2004, Mr. Bush won 44 percent of the Latino vote, more than any other Republican presidential candidate ever. It was the first time Republicans tried to divide the Latino vote and prove the phrase attributed to Ronald Reagan: “Latinos are Republican. They just don’t know it yet.”

But instead of continuing their efforts to court Latino voters, Republicans turned their backs. As a candidate in 2016, Mr. Trump announced he would build his wall at the border, and that Mexico would pay for it. This is not how to win the hearts of Latinos.

The Latino vote is increasingly powerful, diverse and sophisticated. And in exchange for that vote, which can make or break a president, the Latino community expects concrete benefits. A few words in Spanish and a few empty promises are no longer enough.

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