Rep. Cedric Richmond set to join House Ways and Means Committee

Rep. Cedric RichmondCedric Levon RichmondBiden campaign ratchets up courting of Black voters, specifically Black men Buttigieg, former officials added to Biden’s transition team The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by Facebook – Trump encouraged to call for calm during Wisconsin visit MORE (D-La.) — national co-chair of Joe BidenJoe BidenCoons beats back progressive Senate primary challenger in Delaware Biden courts veterans amid fallout from Trump military controversies Biden campaign manager touts ‘multiple pathways’ to victory MORE‘s presidential campaign and a former Congressional Black Caucus chair — is set to join the powerful House Ways and Means Committee.

Richmond is poised to fill the seat left vacant by the late Rep. John LewisJohn LewisGOP ramps up attacks on Democrats over talk of nixing filibuster Smithsonian to reopen four DC museums on Friday Bills players to highlight social justice initiatives with helmet decals MORE (D-Ga.), a civil rights leader and senior member of the tax-writing panel who died in July. The committee has jurisdiction over tax, trade and health issues.

The Louisiana Democrat has been recommended by the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee to serve on panel. The full Democratic Caucus still needs to approve the assignment.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Congressman Cedric Richmond is a proven leader in our Caucus, whose vision and expertise will be essential to promote fairness in our tax system and secure economic justice and financial security for millions of hard-working families,” House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi seeks to put pressure on GOP in COVID-19 relief battle On The Money: Pelosi says House will stay in session until stimulus deal is reached | GOP short of votes on Trump’s controversial Fed pick | WTO rules Trump tariffs on Chinese goods illegal Democratic lawmakers call for an investigation into allegations of medical neglect at Georgia ICE facility MORE (D-Calif.) said in a statement.

Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard NealRichard Edmund NealCoons beats back progressive Senate primary challenger in Delaware Pelosi: House will stay in session until agreement is reached on coronavirus relief On The Money: Senate Democrats block GOP relief bill | Senators don’t expect stimulus until after election | Jobless claims plateau MORE (D-Mass.) added that “John Lewis’s shoes are impossible to fill, but I know that Rep. Richmond will honor Congressman Lewis’s legacy and commitment to justice as he takes on this new responsibility.”

Richmond has been a member of Congress since 2011, and has been serving on the House Judiciary and Homeland Security committees. He led the Congressional Black Caucus from 2017 to 2019 and is currently the chair of the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation. 

He endorsed Biden shortly after the former vice president announced his presidential run, and was named co-chair of the campaign in May 2019.

Source Article

Read more

Local foundation dedicates memorial garden commemorating victims of addiction | Richmond Local News

Jill Cichowicz lost her twin brother, Scott Zebrowski, to an overdose in 2017. Cichowicz visited Zebrowski’s brick in the garden Saturday along with 11 family members, including her mother, Linda, and two young sons.

Linda said one of the last things her son told her before he died was that if something happened to him, he didn’t want his family to be ashamed to tell his story. Cichowicz helps run A Night For Scott, an annual local fundraiser for the Scott Zebrowski Scholarship Fund.

“We’ve cried every day, but we hope we can save somebody else’s life by telling Scott’s story,” Cichowicz said.

Dan Schneider has made it his life’s mission to save other people’s lives by sharing his son’s story in Netflix’s “The Pharmacist,” a documentary series detailing how Schneider has used his grief to help others heal.

Schneider’s son, Danny Jr., was fatally shot at the age of 22 while trying to buy crack in New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward in April 1999. Schneider came to McShin’s event to speak, share his story and see a brick in the garden bearing his son’s name.

“I get a chance when I travel to tell my story, and if I can save a life in the process, it’s well worth it. [Addiction] is still horrible, and it isn’t getting better. This is a camaraderie of people who have lost their kids,” said Schneider, gesturing around him to the people milling about the garden, some smiling, some crying and hugging over bricks commemorating their lost loved ones.

Source Article

Read more