Trump returns to White House after saying he ‘learned’ about COVID-19 by having it

At a news conference Monday afternoon, the president’s physician declined to comment on Trump telling Americans not to be afraid. “I’m not going to get into what the president says,” Dr. Sean Conley said.

Trump has for months has played down the threat of the pandemic, mocked mask-wearing, flouted public health guidelines and expressed little empathy for the nearly 210,000 Americans who have died.

Criticized for mishandling his response, he and his campaign now are casting him as someone strong and uniquely qualified to lead the fight.

“I learned a lot about COVID,” Trump said in a video he tweeted Sunday afternoon. “I learned it by really going to school. This is the real school. This isn’t the, ‘Let’s-read-the-book school.’ And I get it. And I understand it. And it’s a very interesting thing, and I’m going to be letting you know about it.”

“I feel better than I did 20 years ago!” he tweeted Monday afternoon.

A spokeswoman for his campaign on Monday criticized the Democratic presidential nominee, former Vice President Joe Biden, for having not contracted the virus himself.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump boards Marine One as he leaves the White House to go to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after he tested positive for COVID-19, Oct. 2, 2020, in Washington.

President Donald Trump boards Marine One as he leaves the White House to go to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after he tested positive for COVID-19, Oct. 2, 2020, in Washington.

President Donald Trump boards Marine One as he leaves the White House to go to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after he tested positive for COVID-19, Oct. 2, 2020, in Washington.

“He has experience now fighting the coronavirus as an individual,” Erin Perrine, director of press communications for Trump’s campaign, said in an interview with Fox News Monday morning. “Those first-hand experiences Joe Biden, he doesn’t have those.”

In stark contrast with Trump, Biden has for months practiced strict coronavirus protocols, severely limiting the sizes of his events and frequently wearing a face covering. He has repeatedly said he would trust public health officials — unlike Trump, who has disagreed with them in public, politicized mask-wearing and made false and misleading claims about treatments and vaccines.

Biden’s campaign has followed strict social distancing in order to keep the candidate safe and project an image of responsibility in contrast, they say,

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A buoyant Trump returns to a deflated White House

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump attempted to claim victory over the coronavirus Monday as he returned to a White House increasingly hollowed out by the disease, as infections among staffers continued to spread and confusion reigned.

“I will be leaving the great Walter Reed Medical Center today at 6:30 P.M. Feeling really good!” he tweeted shortly before making a dramatic exit through the front doors of the hospital, pumping his fist to cameras. “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life. We have developed, under the Trump Administration, some really great drugs & knowledge. I feel better than I did 20 years ago!”

Upon returning to the White House, Trump took off his mask before posing for a photo op as Marine One took off.

Back inside the West Wing, the mood was less triumphant. “Folks are dropping like flies over here,” a White House official said. “S— is very crazy.”

Normally a hive of activity, the White House press office was dark and deserted as of Monday morning, even before press secretary Kayleigh McEnany revealed she had tested positive for the virus. In one area, the lights hadn’t been turned on. In another section, where roughly half a dozen staffers usually sit tightly grouped together as top administration officials stream in and out, just one aide had come into work.

McEnany joined a string of aides and allies who have tested positive in recent days, as the White House has become an epicenter for a coronavirus outbreak stretching from low-level aides to senators and some of Trump’s closest advisers, like former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who is hospitalized.

Trump and his allies have looked to reframe the narrative around his diagnosis, pushing an image of the president as a “warrior” battling the virus, and arguing that his newly-acquired firsthand experience with the illness gives him an advantage over Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

At the same time, they tried to project a sense of normalcy, issuing images of Trump working from the hospital even as his doctors and top officials detailed drops in his oxygen level and an aggressive course of therapy.

Trump is now expected to remain in the residence where he will receive constant care and monitoring by White House medical staff, and not head to the West Wing until he gets cleared by doctors, said a person familiar with the plans.

Trump’s earlier tweet that he planned to leave the hospital, hours after the revelation that McEnany and two of her deputies had tested positive for the virus, had left West Wing staffers feeling almost entirely in the dark as the outbreak continued to spread, a White House official said.

While the press office was nearly deserted on Monday, on Friday a group of more than half a dozen officials, including White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, had gathered in McEnany’s office in cloth masks for about an hour.

Staffers are not being consistently informed through official channels or contact tracers about

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Comforting brown returns as a fall home decor trend

In recent years, brown anything in a living space was considered by some arbiters of decor as drab and outdated. But this fall the hue is back in favor, in part because of the unsettled, anxious state of the world.

“Brown traditionally makes people feel comfortable and safe, and those are feelings that many of us are looking to our homes to provide,” says interior designer Dawn Hamilton of Oakland Park, Florida.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

It’s just one of the trends in decor this season, when the pandemic has made home an even more essential space for living, working, studying and more. Also on the watch list: flexible rooms, indoor and out.

Cozy palette

Hamilton says today’s brown palette is being used in new ways, as a neutral in all kinds of materials, and as an accent color.

“Brown feels very earthy and rich. It’s warm and inviting, and has the same grounding properties as black, although it’s not quite as harsh,” she says.

New York designer Becky Shea also cites brown’s organic versatility: “It’s a tone that works cohesively with neutrals as well as dark, bold tones like navy, graphite and black.”

Eilyn Jimenez of Sire Design in Miami is adding a mocha brown vanity to the guest bathroom of a “minimalist, French chateau-style” home she’s designing. “It adds a layer of depth with a vintage feel,” she says.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Don’t overdo brown, she warns, but blend it with modern materials like marble for beautiful juxtapositions.

“Bringing it in with light woods, leathers and other natural materials can help make a space feel timeless,” Jimenez says.

Melissa Morgan of M Interiors in San Antonio, Texas, thinks brown’s rebirth is “a reaction to years of very light, tonal interiors. Clients are looking for warmth and sanctuary in their homes more than ever.”

Lighter, yellowish browns, like caramel, often works well in leather.

“In upholstery, we consider saddle leather to be a form of brown that’s like a trusty pair of blue jeans — it goes with everything,” says Chicago designer Brynn Olson.

Soft browns and caramels are also appearing in pillows, lamps and drapes. Caning is on trend too, says Amy Leferink of Interior Impressions in Woodbury, Minnesota.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

As for furniture, Olson likes the effect of brown stains on walnut and white oak, and says a beautifully stained built-in is timeless. “Natural walnut will always feel fresh, and we love to pair it with bright white decor such as plaster vases, for a sophisticated pairing of textures,” she says.

That brown-and-white combo has been a favorite of decorating icons, including Billy Baldwin, says New York City designer Glenn Gissler. Baldwin’s apartment in Manhattan featured a mix of glossy brown walls, white and chartreuse furniture, and brass accents. Inspired, Gissler recently painted a New York loft in a deep, rich brown, with columns and ceilings in crisp white. A long,

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Why The Rock Damaged His Own House, Ty Pennington Returns to Reality TV, 2021 Colors of the Year

House Party” is realtor.com®’s official podcast about the overlapping worlds of real estate and pop culture, hosted by Natalie Way and Rachel Stults. Click the player above to hear our take on this week’s hot topics.

In an extremely on-brand move, actor and former WWE star Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson inflicted some serious pain on the gate of his rented Atlanta mansion. He’s filming a movie there and has been living in an eight-bedroom, 8.5-bathroom Southern Colonial estate. But why, pray tell, did he go “Fast and Furious” on the front gate? We get into it on this week’s episode.

Other topics we discuss:

  • Ty Pennington‘s triumphant return as host of a new HGTV show, “Ty Breaker”
  • The colors of the year, according to several paint companies
  • A “Star Trek”–themed house that you can rent for $200,000 a month
  • This week’s celebrity real estate winner and loser

Want more “House Party”? Subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. And please: Throw us a five-star rating if you like what you hear. The more good ratings and reviews we have, the easier it is for people to find us.

Want to chime in? Have your own crazy home-related story you’re dying to share? We’re all ears, eagerly waiting to discuss all of your burning real estate questions on “The Mailbox” segment. Email us at [email protected], follow us on Facebook and Instagram, or tweet us @housepartypod on Twitter.

The post ‘House Party’ Podcast: Why The Rock Damaged His Own House, Ty Pennington Returns to Reality TV, 2021 Colors of the Year appeared first on Real Estate News & Insights | realtor.com®.

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House returns with 1 month to strike new COVID-19 stimulus deal with Senate

Mannequins with face masks and designer clothing fill a window at a Diane Von Furstenberg store in New York City on September 8, 2020. Photo by John Angelillo/UPI | License Photo

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This week: House returns for pre-election sprint

The House is returning this week for its final work period before the November election, with a government funding fight looming and uncertainty growing over whether Congress will pass a fifth coronavirus relief bill. 

The House, set to reconvene on Monday, has only 12 working days before they are scheduled to leave Washington, D.C., again until after the election. The Senate is currently scheduled to be in for part of October, though senators have questioned, absent a last-minute COVID-19 bill, if they will stick to their full schedule. 

Before they leave, Congress will need to pass a stopgap funding bill by Sept. 30 in order to prevent an election year government shutdown. Lawmakers are expected to use a continuing resolution (CR), which will continue funding at fiscal year 2020 levels, to keep the government open starting on Oct. 1. 

Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinBattle over timing complicates Democratic shutdown strategy Overnight Health Care: McConnell: Chance for coronavirus deal ‘doesn’t look that good right now’ | Fauci disagrees with Trump that US rounding ‘final turn’ on pandemic | NIH director ‘disheartened’ by lack of masks at Trump rally McConnell: Chance for coronavirus deal ‘doesn’t look that good right now’ MORE and House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiBiden marks anniversary of the Violence Against Women Act, knocks Trump and McConnell Sunday shows – Trump team defends coronavirus response GOP chair defends Trump messaging on masks: ‘To say that he should have known then what we know now isn’t really fair’ MORE (D-Calif.) have agreed to a “clean” CR, meaning it will not include items either side would view as political poison pills. Because of that informal deal the funding bill is not expected to include coronavirus relief amid a stalemate between congressional Democrats and the White House. 

“We are now looking at anomalies in the rest, and we’ll figure out the timing when we do,” Pelosi said during a weekly press conference.

But they have not agreed yet on a length for the stopgap funding bill. 

Democrats are locked in a behind-the-scenes debate about if they should accept a bill that goes into December, a timeline supported by Republicans, or push for a CR that would go into early next year, when Democrats hope they will have more leverage if they win back the Senate and Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenCrowd aims ‘lock him up’ chant at Obama during Trump rally Biden campaign plans to run ad during every NFL game until Election Day LA mayor condemns protesters shouting ‘death to police’ outside hospital treating ambushed officers MORE wins the White House. 

“We’ve gone back and forth, it’s a split decision in the caucus. If you can tell us what happens Nov. 3 it is a lot easier. … The uncertainty about the presidential election is an element,” Senate Democratic Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinBattle over timing complicates Democratic shutdown strategy GOP senators say coronavirus deal dead until after election Senate Democrats introduce bill to sanction Russians

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In-person art returns to Garden City Arts – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

GARDEN CITY–After a few trial runs, some of the adult, in-person classes resumed at Garden City Arts in August, but information about the classes was not publicly known until mid-September.

Katy Guthrie, executive director of Garden City Arts, said the reopening of classes was not publicly announced earlier because they wanted to make sure they could be done in a safe manner.

“The first class we only had six participants, but that was absolutely fine, because it gave us a good sense of how many we could fit in the space comfortably and safely,” she said. “We had three in-person classes in August and both went very well.”

So far only two adult programs have resumed in-person — Blushing Artiste and Acrylic Pour, Guthrie said. They’re the programs they were confident could be restarted safely.

The classes look different now than they did pre-COVID-19, Guthrie said. Teachers and participants are required to wear masks and everyone is at their own desk 6 feet apart.

Classes sizes have also shrunk, Guthrie said. Prior to COVID-19, they had more seating and up to 20 people per class.

“We’re down to a maximum of eight to 10, so we cut our class sizes in half, and we’re really making sure that everyone feels comfortable,” she said.

Additionally, instructors are encouraged to check with participants before approaching or handling supplies, Guthrie said. They want to make sure no one feels like their space is being invaded and that they feel safe.

In particular to the reopened classes, Blushing Artiste, a paint class, looks different in that refreshments are no longer offered and it is only held once a month.

Guthrie said Arcylic Pour has changed little, as it’s a class that feels like it was made in response to COVID-19.

“Everyone kind of works at their own pace and at their own station and does their own thing after a very quick demo,” she said.

Cleaning has also been stepped up in the classrooms, Guthrie said.

“All brushes are sanitized in between classes, that’s why we don’t have back-to-back classes anymore, to ensure that supplies are not being handled by the same person,” she said. “We’re making sure that everyone has their own supplies. We also thoroughly clean surfaces that are heavy traffic areas, just to ensure everyone’s safety.”

One big change to in-person classes is that pre-enrollment is now required, Guthrie said. Walk-ins are accepted if there is room, but with a limited class size, it’s unlikely.

For more information, visit gardencityarts.org.

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