Trump, down for a week with coronavirus, returns to rallying with large White House gathering.

Just over a week since he was hospitalized with Covid-19, President Trump is returning to his beloved rallies.

At 2 p.m., Mr. Trump appeared on a White House balcony and addressed a gathering of conservative activists on the South Lawn. More than 2,000 invitations went out for the event, according to one official.

On Monday, the president will return to must-win Florida for a “Make America Great Again” event at Orlando Sanford International Airport — his first battleground-state rally since testing positive for the virus.

Mr. Trump’s rationale is easy to discern: He is eager to get back into the fray. And, more to the point, he’s hungry for the adulation of his supporters.

But the political wisdom of attending campaign events as a lethal virus ripples through the White House staff is dubious, at best.

Mr. Trump’s insistence since leaving the hospital that Covid-19 was nothing to dwell on and a challenge that can be easily overcome has highlighted the cavalier approach he has taken to the virus for six months. Returning to the campaign trail while the virus might still be working through his system will have the same effect. In an interview on “Tucker Carlson Tonight” on Friday, Mr. Trump said that he was “medication free.”

But as he trails Joseph R. Biden Jr. in the polls just over three weeks before Election Day, and with millions of votes are already being cast, Mr. Trump will not be denied.

One person familiar with the planning for the White House event said that all attendees would be required to bring and wear a mask, and that they would have to submit to a temperature check and a fill out a questionnaire.

As Mr. Trump prepares to hit the campaign trail again, outside medical experts caution that doing so could pose risks to himself and others. Attendees at the Florida event will be asked to sign a disclaimer stating that “you and any guests voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to Covid-19.”

Outside medical experts said that resuming public duties might worsen Mr. Trump’s condition, which could still deteriorate in the next several days. Covid-19 patients can take turns for the worse during the second week of illness.

Then there are the potential risks Mr. Trump could pose to others. According to C.D.C. guidelines, people with mild to moderate cases of Covid-19 most likely “remain infectious no longer than 10 days after symptom onset.”

Dr. Sean P. Conley, the White House physician, said on Thursday that Mr. Trump could safely “return to public engagements” on Saturday — a timeline that was questioned by outside experts.

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Reboot Test Kitchen Returns with A New Interactive Animated Short

Seattle’s Reboot Test Kitchen is returning this October to workshop an interactive tale that will explore gender identity.

Seattle’s Reboot Test Kitchen is returning this October to workshop an interactive tale that will explore gender identity through the larger than life imagination of a child.

Writer Adam Kern is hopeful that his “_____form Prologue” will develop into an interactive animated short. The medium will be a natural fit as the piece features slice-of-life moments that often erupt into epic clashes of dragons and fantasy. The project is designed to showcase the internal weight and importance that identity can carry for the young protagonist.

The workshop highlights an inclusive and diverse cast of actors, featuring professional voice-over artist Julie Rei who also served as an invaluable consultant on the piece.

‘Trans representation in art is not only a personal mission of mine, but also aligns with the mission of Reboot Theatre Company,” says Jasmine Joshua, founder and Artistic Director of Reboot Theatre Company. “I chose Adam’s script because I wanted to encourage writers of all backgrounds to include trans narratives in their work and, as a trans writer, artist, and producer, I wanted to help him develop it and provide the dramaturgical support needed to make the piece as authentic and uplifting as possible.’

Kern says, “As a cis-gendered gay man, I’ve always realized that my understanding of the complexities these characters are going through are not to the level of those who have actually lived through them. Authentic feedback and assistance have always been one of our major priorities and the Test Kitchen will continue to be a natural extension of that goal.”

Kern, a professional actor who also co-owns and directs for an immersive theatre company in Cleveland, has produced 30-40 readings of other artists work, but states that he’s beyond thrilled to watch his words come to life as a first-time writer himself.

Producer Clint Sears adds that he was immediately on board for the idea the moment Kern pitched it. “Empathy starts with understanding and Adam is crafting something that’s not only entertaining but accessible for everyone. To find the balance in a work that has authentic representation and speaks to cultural awareness as well would be the ultimate success.”

The performance and workshop will be on Monday, October 12th, between 7:00-9:00 PM PT, and will include work from five other artists. More information available at https://www.reboottheatre.org.

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Trump returns to White House, state GOP files lawsuit against Pritzker tax amendment and the return of Dark Lord imperial stout



a bottle of wine on a table: Three Floyds Brewing in Munster, Ind. will release its coveted Dark Lord imperial stout via touch-free pick up this fall instead of at its usual Dark Lord Day festival in the spring.


© Gregg Gearhart / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Three Floyds Brewing in Munster, Ind. will release its coveted Dark Lord imperial stout via touch-free pick up this fall instead of at its usual Dark Lord Day festival in the spring.

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a man talking on a cell phone: Cubs President Theo Epstein talks with GM Jed Hoyer and manager David Ross before a game against the White Sox on Sept. 25, 2020, at Guaranteed Rate Field.


© John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Cubs President Theo Epstein talks with GM Jed Hoyer and manager David Ross before a game against the White Sox on Sept. 25, 2020, at Guaranteed Rate Field.

Good morning, Chicago. Illinois public health officials reported Monday 1,853 new known coronavirus cases and 14 additional confirmed deaths. In Chicago, the positivity rate has increased over the last three days: it’s now at 4.4%.

Meanwhile, the CDC updated to its COVID-19 guidelines to say the virus can spread more than 6 feet through the air. Some experts said the updated guidance isn’t enough — here’s why.

Also, a Chicago-area study showed that nearly one-third of coronavirus patients experienced some type of altered state. The neurological symptoms identified ranged from confusion to delirium to unresponsiveness.

Here’s more coronavirus news and other top stories you need to know to start your day.

Trump, after receiving unprecedented level of care, downplays COVID-19 threat and returns to White House — without a mask

President Donald Trump staged a dramatic return to the White House Monday night after leaving the military hospital where he was receiving an unprecedented level of care for COVID-19. He immediately ignited a new controversy by declaring that despite his illness the nation should not fear the virus that has killed more than 210,000 Americans — and then he entered the White House without a protective mask.



a man standing next to a tree: Scott Sheridan, a tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, is losing his job as the school eliminates many offerings in the humanities.


© Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Scott Sheridan, a tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, is losing his job as the school eliminates many offerings in the humanities.

Trump’s message alarmed infectious disease experts and suggested the president’s own illness had not caused him to rethink his often-cavalier attitude toward the disease, which has also infected the first lady and several White House aides, including new cases revealed on Monday.

GOP-aligned group files lawsuit challenging ballot language on Pritzker’s graduated-rate income tax amendment

The Illinois Policy Institute, a GOP-aligned group opposed to Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker’s graduated-rate income tax plan, filed a lawsuit suit Monday contending the explanation of the proposed state constitutional amendment sent to voters was “misleading” and needs court-ordered clarification.



J.B. Pritzker wearing a suit and tie: Gov. J.B. Pritzker holds a news conference at the James R. Thompson Center in Chicago on Sept. 22, 2020.


© E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Gov. J.B. Pritzker holds a news conference at the James R. Thompson Center in Chicago on Sept. 22, 2020.

The Pritzker-backed Vote Yes for Fairness group backing the proposed amendment called the lawsuit “frivolous” and said it was simply an attempt to gain attention to efforts to

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Trump discharged from Walter Reed, returns to White House

President Trump was discharged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and returned to the White House on Monday evening to continue his fight against the novel coronavirus, after his medical team warned that he “may not entirely be out of the woods yet.”

Dressed in a navy suit and tie and wearing a face mask, Trump walked out of Walter Reed on his own. Upon walking out the doors of the hospital, he made a low fist pump and gave a thumbs up to the press as he got into a black SUV to head to Marine One.

The president teased his return to the White House Monday afternoon, saying he is “feeling really good!”

“Don’t be afraid of Covid,” the president tweeted. “Don’t let it dominate your life. We have developed, under the Trump Administration, some really great drugs & knowledge.”

He added: “I feel better than I did 20 years ago!”

Trump appeared to have his reelection campaign at the forefront of his thoughts shortly before departing Walter Reed, promising his followers on Twitter that he will be back on the stump soon and blasting polls that show him trailing Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

Upon arriving to the White House, the president walked out on the balcony overlooking the South Lawn, surrounded by American flags, and saluted military officers and Marine One as it departed.

The president arrived back to the White House after his physician, Dr. Sean Conley, hosted a press conference detailing the president’s progress and condition as he battles COVID-19.

WHITE HOUSE PHYSICIAN SAYS TRUMP ‘MAY NOT ENTIRELY BE OUT OF THE WOODS YET’ IN BATTLE AGAINST COVID19

“The president may not entirely be out of the woods yet,” Conley said, but said that his “clinical status supports the president’s safe return home,” where he said he will be surrounded by medical staff “24/7.”

Conley added that the president met “most of his discharge requirements” on Sunday afternoon.

“We try to get patients out of the hospital as quickly as possible,” Conley said. “There is nothing being done here that we can’t safely do at home.”

He added: “We all remain cautiously optimistic and on guard because we’re in a bit of uncharted territory when it comes to a patient who received the therapies he has.”

Conley added that HIPAA prevents him from discussing some details about the president’s health.

Another member of the president’s medical team said that his heart rate, as of Monday, was measured at 68 beats per minute, and that he had a 97% blood oxygen level. A normal blood oxygen reading is between 95 and 100%.

Conley also told reporters Monday that the president has not been on fever-reducing medicine for over 72 hours.

The medical team also said that the president does not have any “respiratory complaints,” and will receive his fourth round of Remdesivir before he departs Walter Reed Monday evening. The team said that the president will receive his final dose of Remdesivir at the

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Trump Returns To White House, Removes Mask Despite Infection : Live Updates: Trump Tests Positive For Coronavirus : NPR

President Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House on Monday after undergoing treatment for COVID-19 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md.

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President Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House on Monday after undergoing treatment for COVID-19 at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md.

Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump, who spent the weekend in the hospital being treated for COVID-19, made a theatrical return to the White House Monday evening, disembarking Marine One and walking the staircase to the South Portico entrance, where he turned to face the cameras, removed his mask and gave his signature two thumbs up.

Shortly before, a masked Trump had emerged from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he was receiving treatment, pumping his fist and giving a thumbs up as he ignored questions from reporters.

In a video recorded at the White House which he tweeted later, the president seemed somewhat more circumspect about a virus that he has often downplayed, along with measures to halt its spread, such as wearing masks.

Trump thanked the staff of Walter Reed and said that during his three-night stay he had “learned so much about coronavirus.”

“One thing that’s for certain – don’t let it dominate you. Don’t be afraid of it. You’re going to beat it,” he said. “We have the best medical equipment. We have the best medicines. All developed recently. And you’re going to beat it.”

“I went, I didn’t feel so good,” he said, but added that, “And two days ago, I could have left two days ago. Two days ago I felt great, like better than I have in a long time. I said just recently, better than 20 years ago.”

Trump’s physician, Sean Conley, said he is cautiously optimistic about the president’s prognosis, but that medical staff needed to remain on guard for another week.

“Over the past 24 hours, the president’s condition has continued to improve,” Conley told reporters at a news briefing Monday. “He’s met or exceeded all standard hospital discharge criteria.”

“Although he may not be entirely out of the woods yet, the team and I agree that all our evaluations, and most importantly, his clinical status, support the president’s safe return home, where he will be surrounded by world-class medical care, 24/7.”

The president’s treatment has included the steroid dexamethasone and a five-day course of remdesivir. Dr. Brian Garibaldi told reporters on Monday that Trump would get a fifth dose of remdesivir at the White House on Tuesday night and that he continues to receive a steroid.

Asked by a reporter if he had concerns about a possible worsening or reversal of the president’s condition, Conley responded: “You’re absolutely right.”

“That’s why we all remain cautiously optimistic and on guard, because we are in a bit of uncharted territory when it

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Trump returns to White House from Walter Reed

President Donald Trump returned to the White House Monday evening after leaving Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he had been receiving treatment for Covid-19 since Friday.

White House physician Sean Conley said in a briefing with reporters after Trump tweeted that he was leaving the hospital that the president had “met or exceeded all standard hospital discharge criteria” and could be released for continued treatment at the White House.

Trump made his way from Marine One, that had carried him from Walter Reed, up to a balcony overlooking the South Lawn of the White House and removed his mask before posing for photos.

On Sunday, Trump briefly left the hospital to wave to supporters from a motorcade, a move medical experts and Democrats swiftly criticized as “insanity.” The president does not travel anywhere without Secret Service protection, and this outing was no exception. At least two other people were seen in the car with Trump.

Earlier, Trump’s medical team said that he had been placed on a steroid therapy typically used in more severe Covid-19 cases and that his condition was improving after multiple “episodes” over the weekend.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading news from Tuesday on the president’s condition.

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Trump returns to White House after leaving hospital, sheds mask for photo opportunity

Trump abruptly announced earlier in the day on Twitter that he would be leaving Walter Reed.

“I will be leaving the great Walter Reed Medical Center today at 6:30 P.M,” Trump tweeted in the afternoon. “Feeling really good!”

“Don’t be afraid of Covid,” he continued. “Don’t let it dominate your life. We have developed, under the Trump Administration, some really great drugs & knowledge. I feel better than I did 20 years ago!”

The virus has so far killed more than 211,000 people in the United States.

Earlier Monday, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany and two of her deputies were confirmed to have tested positive for Covid-19, among 11 people tied to the president who have contracted the virus in recent days.

Shortly before his departure, Trump tweeted, “Will be back on the Campaign Trail soon!”‘

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines stipulate that a person should quarantine for 10 days after symptoms first appear. The president first said he began feeling sick Thursday, about five days ago. The CDC says those “who are severely ill” with the virus may need to quarantine for up to 20 days.

The president’s physician, Dr. Sean Conley, briefed the news media Monday afternoon, saying the president has improved to the point that he could recommend returning to the White House, although he said Trump is not quite in the clear yet. Conley said the president would continue to take remdesivir, an experimental antiviral drug, later Monday and on Tuesday.

“Though he may not be entirely out of the woods yet, the team and I agree that all our evaluations, and most importantly, his clinical status, support the president’s safe return home,” Conley said. He declined to say when the president last tested negative for the virus.

Asked about the results of the president’s chest X-ray, Conley said he could not discuss it, citing health privacy laws. But he seemed to do so selectively, having released other information that would be protected by the law. It was not clear why Conley did not want the public to know about the X-ray, which could indicate whether signs of pneumonia are present.

On Sunday, Conley acknowledged in a briefing that he had not been completely forthcoming about Trump’s condition at a briefing Saturday to “reflect the upbeat attitude” of the White House.

Later Sunday, White House strategic communications director Alyssa Farah defended the mixed messaging by saying, “When you’re treating a patient, you want to project confidence, you want to lift their spirits, and that was the intent.”

Doctors had said Sunday that Trump could be discharged as soon as Monday, but they also said he was placed on a steroid therapy typically used in more severe coronavirus cases.

Conley said Trump experienced a high fever Friday morning and was administered supplemental oxygen later in the day. He added that Trump’s oxygen levels dipped for a second time Saturday, but he could not answer whether Trump required supplemental oxygen that day. Doctors said

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Trump returns to White House and removes mask despite having Covid



a passenger seat of a car: US President Trump waves from the back of a car in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020.


© Alex Edelman/AFP/Getty Images
US President Trump waves from the back of a car in a motorcade outside of Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland on October 4, 2020.

President Donald Trump staged a reckless departure from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday, telling his followers the virus that dangerously deprived him of oxygen and hospitalized him for 72 hours was nothing to fear before posing for a mask-less photo-op on the White House balcony.

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It was a remarkable attempt to convert his still-ongoing disease into a show of strength, even as it underscored his longstanding practice of denying the pandemic’s severity and downplaying its risks despite the more than 200,000 Americans dead.

“Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life,” Trump wrote several hours before walking carefully out of the hospital’s gold front doors, even as his doctors warned he wasn’t yet “out of the woods.”

Wearing a white cloth mask and a navy blue suit, Trump gave several thumbs up and a first bumps as he walked down the hospital’s front steps toward his waiting helicopter. He would not answer when asked how many of his staffers had tested positive.

After a flight over Washington, Trump landed on the South Lawn and proceeded in an unusual route up a set of stairs the first-floor balcony, where aides had positioned a row of American flags.

Peeling off his mask, Trump posed in salute as his helicopter departed before walking inside. The building he’s returning to has become a center for viral contagion — in part because of disregard for mitigation measures.

Then Trump posted a propaganda video after apparently re-doing his White House entrance for effect. He also nonsensically seemed to claim he faced the coronavirus because he “had to” as a “leader” — a deeply misleading message to deliver.

“We’re going back. We’re going back to work. We’re gonna be out front. As your leader I had to do that. I knew there’s danger to it but I had to do it,” Trump says in the video. “I stood out front. I led. Nobody that’s a leader would not do what I did. I know there’s a risk there’s a danger. That’s OK. And now I’m better, and maybe I’m immune? I don’t know. But don’t let it dominate your lives. Get out there, be careful.”

The message was jarring not only because it was irresponsible but that it came from a current coronavirus patient who has experienced serious symptoms of the disease and whose recovery has included experimental treatments unavailable to most Americans.

As more of his aides test positive for the disease and questions emerge about what steps have been taken to curtail the spread, Trump’s physician Dr. Sean Conley offered few details on how staff members would be kept safe upon Trump’s return to the White House, which is equipped with its own medical suite.

He also continued to obfuscate on critical pieces of information, such as

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Trump returns to White House despite mysteries around his health

Trump left Walter Reed Medical Center by helicopter on Monday evening, with Marine One touching down on the White House South Lawn about 15 minutes later. He walked out of Walter Reed under his own power, but did not take questions from reporters gathered outside.

Upon his return, Trump walked up the stairs to the White House wearing a white mask before taking it off on the balcony, standing for a few moments for a photo op before walking in without wearing the mask. Experts say that someone in Trump‘s progression of the virus is still likely contagious, and multiple people could be seen waiting for him on the other side of the entrance.

Trump’s discharge comes as the White House faces accusations of a lack of transparency about the severity of the president’s illness, and as the president has sought to project some semblance of normalcy despite contracting the virus.

It was a striking statement, even for a president who has repeatedly played down the threat of the virus throughout the pandemic, and worked to project normalcy and portray himself as undaunted by it throughout his stay in the hospital.

His administration, meanwhile, has been panned for its response to the pandemic more generally.

Trump was first transferred to Walter Reed on Friday evening out of what the White House said was an “abundance of caution.” His aides have since been eager to show that Trump is still carrying out the duties of the office despite his hospitalization.

But Sean Conley, the president’s physician, appeared to confirm Sunday that Trump’s condition is more serious than the White House had so far acknowledged.

And in a news briefing on Monday afternoon, Conley conceded that the president “may not be entirely out of the woods yet.”

But, he continued, “the team and I agree that all our evaluations — and most importantly his clinical status — support the president’s safe return home, where he’ll be supported by world-class medical care 24/7.“

Trump’s discharge comes at a potentially delicate time, as questions persist about his health.

Some patients see sharp declines about seven to 10 days after infection, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that Covid-positive patients continue to self-isolate for 10 days after symptoms begin to emerge. Trump, whose age and weight increase his risk of severe disease, announced his diagnosis early Friday — four days ago.

The drugs Trump is receiving, and some of the details revealed by Trump’s medical team, suggest that the president has a moderate to severe case of Covid-19.

Trump has received two experimental drugs, care that many of the millions of Americans infected with the virus likely would not have had access to, as well as one steroid generally reserved for patients with severe or critical coronavirus cases.

Conley acknowledged on Monday that

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Trump returns to White House downplaying virus that hospitalized him at Walter Reed

More than a dozen White House officials have tested positive for the coronavirus in recent days, a steadily increasing total that grew again Monday to include press secretary Kayleigh McEnany. How the return of an infected president to such a setting could be managed safely was one of several questions left unanswered Monday as Trump’s medical team briefed reporters about his condition.

“We’ve worked with our infectious-disease experts to make some recommendations for how to keep everything safe down at the White House,” Trump’s doctor Sean Conley said after describing the president’s condition as improving, though he said Trump was “not out of the woods yet.”

Conley declined to describe what specific steps would be made to ensure a safe environment at a building that doubles as a personal residence and a government office while the president remains contagious, which could be for several more days at least.

“I wish I could go into that more, but I just can’t,” he said.

The transformation of the White House into a vector of a deadly pathogen has done little to change the approach of an administration that has been determined to downplay the coronavirus for months. Trump used his personal experience with the disease — which twice knocked his oxygen levels down significantly and required him to be hospitalized and injected with several drugs — to again play down its severity.

“Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life,” Trump tweeted Monday afternoon, three days after he was transported to Walter Reed for treatment. “We have developed, under the Trump Administration, some really great drugs & knowledge. I feel better than I did 20 years ago!”

His statement — seeming to again minimize the pandemic, something he has done consistently since it emerged as a threat earlier this year — immediately drew rebukes.

“ ‘Don’t be afraid’? I wish every American had access to the same health care you’re getting — but they don’t,” Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) wrote on Twitter.

But Trump has given little indication that he plans to change his behavior if or when he is told by doctors that he can resume normal activities.

When he returned to the White House on Monday evening, the contagious president climbed up the stairs rather than use the usual ground-level entrance and posed for pictures. After a few seconds, he reached up with his right hand, took off his mask, put it in his pocket and resumed flashing thumbs up. He then turned and entered the building.

Trump spent Sunday and Monday discussing his campaign, the polls, advertising in key states and what Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden is doing, according to people who spoke to the president. He began discussing with officials Sunday when he could return to the campaign trail — and how.

“Will be back on the Campaign Trail soon!!! The Fake News only shows the Fake Polls,” he tweeted Monday afternoon shortly before leaving the hospital.

Trump is trailing Biden in national and

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