Trump to return to public events with ‘law and order’ address at White House

Defiant in the face of slipping opinion polls, and determined to justify his implausible claim of a full recovery from his encounter with Covid-19, Donald Trump will return to public events on Saturday with a “law and order” address to 2,000 invited guests from the White House balcony.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images


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Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Related: ‘A surreal reality show’: Trump’s terrible week after his Covid diagnosis

Questions about the president’s health are still swirling following the refusal of doctors or aides to reveal when Trump last tested negative for coronavirus, and today’s lunchtime in-person event – just six days after he left Walter Reed medical center following a three-night stay – appears to counter his own government’s health guidelines over large gatherings and social distancing.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.


© Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Donald Trump walks from Marine One after arriving on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington DC, on 1 October.

But after another tumultuous week in which Trump lost further ground to his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, and with the 3 November general election little more than three weeks away, the president is seizing an opportunity to try to reposition himself in the race, despite the apparent health risk to attendees from a man likely to still be contagious.

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In a Friday night interview on Fox News, Trump, who was given a cocktail of antiviral drugs and strong steroids during his hospital stay, insisted he was “medication-free”.

“We pretty much finished, and now we’ll see how things go. But pretty much nothing,” Trump said when Fox medical analyst Dr Marc Siegel asked the president what medications he was still taking.

Earlier in the day, Dr Sean Conley, Trump’s personal physician, issued a letter clearing the president to return to in-person campaign events, but omitting any medical justification, including crucial information about any negative coronavirus tests.

In the Friday interview, Trump said he had been tested, but gave a vague answer about it. “I haven’t even found out numbers or anything yet,” he said. “But I’ve been retested and I know I’m at either the bottom of the scale or free.”

Trump’s speech today at the White House South Lawn will address “law and order” and protests around the country in the wake of the death of George Floyd and racial issues, sources revealed on Friday.

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Trump Maps Return to Campaign Trail After White House Says COVID-19 Treatment Complete | Top News

By Jeff Mason and Steve Holland

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Republican President Donald Trump on Friday prepared to return to the campaign trail with a pair of weekend rallies after his COVID-19 diagnosis sidelined him for a week in the race against Democratic nominee Joe Biden for the White House.

Trump, who announced he had been infected with the coronavirus on Oct. 2 and spent three nights in a military hospital receiving treatment, said late on Thursday he was feeling “really good” and, with a doctor’s blessing, aimed to campaign in Florida on Saturday and in Pennsylvania on Sunday.

Trump’s illness has kept him from crisscrossing the country to rally support and raise cash in the final weeks before the Nov. 3 election. A return to in-person events would be aimed at convincing voters he is healthy enough to campaign and to govern.

While Trump has released several videos on Twitter, he has not appeared in public since he returned home from the hospital on Monday. Biden has continued to campaign, with events scheduled on Friday in Las Vegas, Nevada.

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines say people who are severely ill with COVID-19 might need to stay home for up to 20 days after symptoms first appear.

Biden, who has sharply criticized Trump’s handling of the pandemic, is beating the Republican in national polls, though that lead is narrower in some of the swing states that may determine the election’s outcome.

White House physician Sean Conley said in a memo released on Thursday that Trump had completed his course of therapy for COVID-19, remained stable since returning home from the hospital and could resume public engagements on Saturday.

Sounding hoarse and occasionally pausing and clearing his throat, Trump told Fox News host Sean Hannity in an interview late on Thursday that he was likely to be tested for the virus on Friday. The White House has declined to say when Trump last tested negative.

“I feel so good,” Trump said.

The president is expected to host a “virtual rally” on Friday by appearing on conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh’s radio program.

The Trump and Biden campaigns sparred on Thursday over a televised debate that had been planned for next week. Trump pulled out after the nonpartisan commission in charge said the Oct. 15 event would be held virtually with the candidates in separate locations because of health and safety concerns after Trump contracted COVID-19. Biden’s campaign arranged a town hall-style event in Philadelphia instead.

Trump’s White House and campaign have experienced an outbreak of the virus in the last week, with multiple top aides, including the president’s press secretary and campaign manager, testing positive.

Trump and his staff have largely eschewed wearing masks, against the guidance of health professionals, and held rallies with thousands of people in indoor and outdoor venues despite recommendations against having events with large crowds.

Trump’s health will remain in the spotlight even if he begins holding events again.

(Reporting by Jeff Mason and

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Coronavirus live news: doctor clears Trump to return to public events on Saturday; record global case rise | World news





Trump again calls for in-person debate, citing doctor’s letter

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What we know so far: Trump expected to return to public engagements on Saturday

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Donald Trump added more turbulence on Thursday to the US presidential race by refusing to participate in the next presidential debate with Joe Biden after it was changed to a virtual event to guard against the spread of Covid-19, prompting both campaigns to propose postponing it a week.

On Thursday morning, the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) said that the next presidential debate, due on 15 October, would be a virtual affair, with the candidates appearing remotely.

“In order to protect the health and safety of all, the second presidential debate will take the form of a town meeting, in which the candidates would participate from separate remote locations,” it said.

But Trump, who was hospitalized for three days after disclosing last Friday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, blasted the format change announced by the nonpartisan commission in charge of the debates and expressed concern that his microphone could be cut off at the event:

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White House doctor says Trump could ‘return to public engagements’ on Saturday

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a castle on top of a building: The White House is seen in Washington, early Tuesday, the morning after President Trump returned from the hospital where he was treated for COVID-19.


© J. Scott Applewhite
The White House is seen in Washington, early Tuesday, the morning after President Trump returned from the hospital where he was treated for COVID-19.

President Trump made the stunning announcement that he and First Lady Melania Trump had tested positive for COVID-19 early Friday, Oct. 2. Since that time, several others in Trump’s circle have tested positive for the virus. Here’s the latest about what we know:

  7:40 p.m.  

White House doctor says Trump could ‘return to public engagements’ on Saturday

By Lauren Booker, Globe Staff

Dr. Sean Conley, the physician treating President Trump, says in a statement sent Thursday night that he anticipates for President Trump to be able to “return to public engagement” on Saturday, and cites that date as being day 10 since the president’s diagnosis on Oct. 1.

The doctor’s report says that the president’s “physical exam has remained stable and devoid of any indications to suggest progression of illness.”

“Overall he’s responded extremely well to treatment, without evidence on examination of adverse therapeutic effects,” Conley writes in the memo.

Trump’s afternoon vitals, including heart rate, 69 beats/min, blood pressure, 127/91 mmHG, respiratory rate, 15-17 breaths/min, and pulse oximetry, 96 to 98 percent room air, were also listed in the memo.

  4:51 p.m.  

Biden won’t divulge court expansion stance now

By The Associated Press

Joe Biden says he won’t reveal until after the Nov. 3 election whether he’d consider adding seats to the Supreme Court.

The Democratic presidential nominee told reporters in Arizona on Thursday that voters will “know my opinion on court packing when the election’s over.” He said answering the hypothetical and politically fraught question would play into President Donald Trump’s hands.

Biden has joined his party’s senators in calling for Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to delay a confirmation vote on Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett, until after the election. Barrett would give the court a 6-3 conservative majority.

Some progressives want Biden and Democrats to commit to expanding the court with a slate of liberal justices if they take power in January. Trump and Republicans are using that scenario in the hopes of animating the GOP base and perhaps coaxing votes from some moderate Republicans who dislike Trump but care about the court makeup.

  4:26 p.m.  

Biden calls on Trump to stop insulting Harris

By The Associated Press

Democrat Joe Biden is calling on President Donald Trump to stop insulting his running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris, after the president called her a “monster” during a TV appearance.

Speaking to reporters Thursday on the tarmac in Phoenix, Biden called the Republican president’s comments “despicable” and “so beneath the office of the presidency.” He added of the president: “It’s obvious he has great difficulty dealing with strong women.”

Trump made the comments Thursday on Fox Business in reference to Harris’ performance during Wednesday night’s vice presidential debate with Mike Pence. Harris, who is campaigning in Arizona with Biden, declined to

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Trump can return to ‘public engagements’ this weekend, White House physician says

White House physician Dr. Sean Conley sent out a memorandum on Thursday stating that President Trump will be able to return to public engagements this weekend.

Noting that it will be ten days since Trump was first diagnosed with the novel coronavirus, Conley anticipates that Trump can return to his usual schedule by Saturday.

Conely said that Trump has responded “extremely well to treatment” and said there is no sign of “adverse therapeutic effects.”

“Today the President has completed his course of therapy for COVID-19 as prescribed by his team of physicans,” Conley said in his memo.

“Saturday will be day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the President’s safe return to public engagements at that time,” he added.

Hours earlier, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., teased a constitutional measure to potentially remove Trump from office, following questions regarding Trump’s health as he recovers from coronavirus.

“Tomorrow, by the way, tomorrow, come here tomorrow,” Pelosi said. “We’re going to be talking about the 25th Amendment.”

The president and first lady Melania Trump announced they tested positive for COVID-19 early Friday, just before 1:00 a.m. — althuogh the actual timeline of his diagnosis has been disputed.

The Centers for Disease Control says people “with mild to moderate COVID-19 remain infectious no longer than 10 days after symptom onset. People with more severe symptoms can remain infectious for longer, it says.

TRUMP ACKNOWLEDGES HE WAS ‘VERY SICK’ WHEN HE WAS HOSPITALIZED FOR COVID 

White House officials said Trump started exhibiting symptoms about a week ago.

Trump acknowledged earlier he was “very sick” last week when he was admitted to Walter Reed Medical Center.

Trump highlighted in a new video that while hospitalized, “I took this medicine and it was incredible.”

He told Fox Business’ Maria Bartiromo said Thursday morning he didn’t think he was contagious “at all” anymore.

Still, the Commission on Presidential Debates moved next week’s debate to a virtual setting.

President Trump said he would not participate in a virtual debate. “The commission changed the debate style and that’s not acceptable to us,” Trump said on “Mornings with Maria.” “I beat him in the first debate, I beat him easily.”

PELOSI QUESTIONS TRUMP’S HEALTH, SAYS ‘WE’RE GOING TO BE TALKING ABOUT THE 25TH AMENDMENT’ 

The president added that he expected to “beat [Democratic nominee Joe Biden] in the second debate also.”

“I’m not going to do a virtual debate,” Trump went on. “I’m not going to waste my time at a virtual debate.”

Meanwhile, Trump adviser Stephen Miller announced that he’d tested positive for coronavirus Tuesday, following White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany’s announcement she had contracted the virus on Monday.

Other White House staff who have tested positive for COVID-19 at this point include senior adviser Hope Hicks and director of Oval Office operations Nick Luna. Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien also tested positive for COVID-19.

Former counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway has also

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White House doctor says Trump safe to return to public events on Saturday

White House physician Sean Conley said Thursday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpFive takeaways from the vice presidential debate Harris accuses Trump of promoting voter suppression Pence targets Biden over ISIS hostages, brings family of executed aid worker to debate MORE would be able to make a “safe return” to public events on Saturday, less than two weeks after being diagnosed with the novel coronavirus. 

Conley issued a memo Thursday evening stating that Trump had completed his therapy for COVID-19 and that he has responded “extremely well” to treatment overall. The update came just three days after Trump returned to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he received treatment for 72 hours.

“Since returning home, his physical exam has remained stable and devoid of any indications to suggest progression of illness. Overall he’s responded extremely well to treatment, without evidence on examination of adverse therapeutic effects,” Conley wrote.

“Saturday will be day 10 since Thursday’s diagnosis, and based on the trajectory of advanced diagnostics the team has been conducting, I fully anticipate the President’s safe return to public engagements at that time,” he continued.

Conley also said that, as of Thursday afternoon, Trump’s heart rate was 69 beats per minute, his blood pressure 127/81 mmHg, his respiratory rate 15-17 breaths per minute and his pulse oximetry showed a blood oxygen level of 96-98 percent with room air.

Trump was diagnosed with the coronavirus one week ago, and he experienced a high fever and two drops in his oxygen level after his diagnosis.

Trump was given the antiviral medication remdesivir, the steroid dexamethasone and an experimental antibody cocktail produced by Regeneron in the course of his treatment. He was also given supplemental oxygen twice — once Friday and again on Saturday — according to his medical team.

Trump has been eager to get back to work since returning to the White House Monday evening. He worked from the Oval Office on Wednesday and Thursday despite likely still being infectious, and has filmed videos touting the drugs with which he was treated.

In a video posted to his Twitter account on Wednesday, Trump described the Regeneron cocktail as a “cure.”

Trump indicated in a Fox Business interview Thursday morning that he wants to return to the campaign trail, and Conley’s memo seems to give him the clearance to do so as soon as Saturday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that patients self-isolate for at least 10 days after experiencing symptoms from the coronavirus.

Conley, who has not briefed the press on Trump’s condition since Monday, has been regularly issuing brief updates about his condition.

He has been evasive on specific questions about the president’s condition and illness, including dodging questions about what scans showed about the health of the president’s lungs and the date of Trump’s last negative COVID-19 test.

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The return of warm, earthy browns is among fall decor trends | Home & Garden

Don’t overdo brown, she warns, but blend it with modern materials like marble for beautiful juxtapositions.

“Bringing it in with light woods, leathers and other natural materials can help make a space feel timeless,” Jimenez says.

Melissa Morgan of M Interiors in San Antonio, Texas, thinks brown’s rebirth is “a reaction to years of very light, tonal interiors. Clients are looking for warmth and sanctuary in their homes more than ever.”

Lighter, yellowish browns, like caramel, often works well in leather.

“In upholstery, we consider saddle leather to be a form of brown that’s like a trusty pair of blue jeans – it goes with everything,” said Chicago designer Brynn Olson.

Soft browns and caramels are also appearing in pillows, lamps and drapes. Caning is on trend too, said Amy Leferink of Interior Impressions in Woodbury, Minn.

As for furniture, Olson likes the effect of brown stains on walnut and white oak, and said that a beautifully stained built-in is timeless. “Natural walnut will always feel fresh, and we love to pair it with bright white decor such as plaster vases, for a sophisticated pairing of textures,” she said.

That brown-and-white combo has been a favorite of decorating icons including Billy Baldwin, said New York City designer Glenn Gissler. Baldwin’s apartment in Manhattan featured a mix of glossy brown walls, white and chartreuse furniture, and brass accents. Inspired, Gissler recently painted a New York loft in a deep, rich brown, with columns and ceilings in crisp white. A long, tuxedo-style sofa in milk-chocolatey velvet anchors the space, along with tonal modern art.

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Despite White House outbreak, Trump and some aides return to work, flouting CDC guidance

But midafternoon — less than a week after testing positive for the potentially lethal virus — Trump returned to work in the West Wing, potentially endangering any staffers still in the building.

Trump’s presence there sent yet another message to the public that illness has not chastened a president who has consistently eschewed masks and social distancing. His rush to get back to business as usual just two days after leaving Walter Reed National Military Medical Center has been the most prominent example of the continued defiance of public health guidelines at the White House. But it isn’t the only one.

Though aides who have tested positive, including counselor Hope Hicks and press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, have stayed home, aides who have continued to test negative have remained on the job. Among them were Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, senior adviser Jared Kushner, social media director Dan Scavino and political director Brian Jack, administration officials said.

Kushner was in contact with Christie, Hicks and others involved in prepping the president for last week’s debate. Meadows has been in contact with virtually everyone in the president’s orbit who is now sick. And at least four aides who traveled on Air Force One and Marine One with a maskless Trump last Thursday were in the White House this week, officials say.

Meanwhile, Vice President Pence, who aides said has had several negative tests, flew to Utah on Tuesday to prepare for his debate late Wednesday with the Democratic vice-presidential nominee, Sen. Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.).

Pence attended the Sept. 26 Rose Garden ceremony — to announce Trump’s nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court — that is suspected to be at the center of the White House outbreak. He was near others during the ceremony who have since tested positive and was in the Oval Office last week with Trump, albeit briefly.

And almost every senior official in the White House this week shared a room with an aide or adviser who has since tested positive, officials said, but they defended their presence by saying it was usually not in “close contact” — or within six feet for more than 15 minutes.

Their decisions reflect a White House that has declined to follow the best medical practices to contain the virus, even as at least 13 employees in the complex have tested positive. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend that anyone exposed to the virus remain isolated for at least two weeks to avoid the risk of spreading the virus to others.

Beyond the White House gates, other Trump aides also have exhibited a reluctance to fully embrace the CDC guidelines — most prominently Attorney General William P. Barr, who also attended the Sept. 26 Rose Garden ceremony. Despite that, Barr attended a Justice Department meeting Friday and, after several days at home, returned again to his office Wednesday, aides said.

Since news of Trump’s infection was made public last Thursday, Barr has had six coronavirus tests

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White House cleaning crews hard at work on Trump’s return

The White House cleaning crews have their work cut out for them after an outbreak of coronavirus that infected President Trump, first lady Melania Trump and several aides and staffers.

Trump returned to the White House just three days after he was diagnosed with COVID-19 and admitted to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for treatment even though he has not yet been cleared of the virus and was receiving experimental drugs to control his symptoms.

A member of the cleaning staff sprays the James Brady Briefing Room of the White House, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

A member of the cleaning staff sprays the James Brady Briefing Room of the White House, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

WHITE HOUSE RELEASES NEW CORONAVIRUS PRECAUTIONS FOR RESIDENCE STAFF AFTER PRESIDENT TRUMP’S DIAGNOSIS

Cleaning crews in hazmat suits disinfected the James Brady Briefing Room and other parts of the West Wing upon Trump’s return.

Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany briefed reporters on the president’s condition last Thursday from that room and subsequently tested positive for the coronavirus on Monday. Her assistant, Chad Gilmartin, also tested positive.

The two are among at least 20 administration officials and lawmakers who have come down with the virus. Many of them may have been infected at what has been called a “super-spreader event” at the Rose Garden to celebrate Trump’s nominee to fill the Supreme Court vacancy — Judge Amy Coney Barrett. The event has come under fire as most attendees were maskless and proper social distancing was not observed.

TRUMP URGES CONGRESS TO PASS MORE CORONAVIRUS AID HOURS AFTER BREAKING OFF NEGOTIATIONS

Trump returned to the White House, traveling on Marine One, and shot a maskless video of himself waving from his balcony despite still being contagious.

President Trump holds his face mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington, after leaving Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

President Trump holds his face mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington, after leaving Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

He tweeted Tuesday morning that he is planning to attend next week’s debate with Democratic challenger Joe Biden in Miami.

The president’s diagnosis has fueled speculation over White House measures for keeping its staff safe during the pandemic.

The White House maintains that since March, it has adopted hospital-grade disinfection policies, had medical teams lead coronavirus workshops, significantly reduced staff and encourage maximum teleworking.

On Tuesday, it issued updated guidance on coronavirus protections for employees, which included wearing personal protective equipment and taking additional precautionary measures to prevent cross-contamination.

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Fox News’ Bradford Betz contributed to this report. 

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White House prepared for Trump to return to Oval Office



a man wearing a blue shirt: US President Donald Trump wears a facemask as he leaves Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland heading to Marine One on October 5, 2020, to return to the White House after being discharged. - Trump announced Monday he would be "back on the campaign trail soon", just before returning to the White House from a hospital where he was being treated for Covid-19. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)


© Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
US President Donald Trump wears a facemask as he leaves Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland heading to Marine One on October 5, 2020, to return to the White House after being discharged. – Trump announced Monday he would be “back on the campaign trail soon”, just before returning to the White House from a hospital where he was being treated for Covid-19. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)

President Donald Trump’s aides were preparing for him to return to the Oval Office on Wednesday, an eventuality one senior official seemed to believe was so inevitable he mistakenly claimed it already happened.

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After Larry Kudlow, the director of the National Economic Council, said in an interview that Trump had been working from the Oval Office a day after returning from the hospital, the White House quickly clarified the President remained isolated in his residence.

But few seemed to think that would last much longer, even though he is carrying an active case of coronavirus. In a new memo released midday Wednesday, Trump’s doctor relayed the President saying “I feel great!” and reported he had been symptom-free for 24 hours. But the memo declined again to provide critical information such as when Trump last tested negative, what his lung scans show and whether he is still on the steroid dexamethasone or any other medications that could be masking his symptoms.

Trump’s “schedule right now is fluid, we’re looking at his prognosis,” chief of staff Mark Meadows told reporters at the White House. “If he decides to go to the Oval, we’ve got safety protocols there.”

Indeed, preparations have been made for Trump’s eventual return to the Oval Office, including positioning a so-called “isolation cart” stocked with yellow medical gowns, respirator masks and plastic goggles required for visitors just outside the office doors near where Trump’s assistants sit.

Trump made phone calls and spoke with aides mostly from his third-floor quarters on Tuesday but did tape a video from downstairs where offices were set up for him next to the medical suite. The video hadn’t been released by Wednesday morning, nor had the White House distributed any photos of the President after his return from Walter Reed hospital.

Trump’s intent on returning to his office had some senior officials convinced he already had.

“The President actually showed up in the Oval Office yesterday with extra precautions with respect to his Covid-19,” Kudlow said Wednesday in an interview on CNBC. “He’s getting a lot better, he’s a lot strong. So there was some limited activity.”

Kudlow’s account was entirely different than Meadows’, who was speaking simultaneously at the White House. The White House insisted Kudlow misspoke and that Trump remained in the White House residence.

All except Trump’s senior-most aides are mostly in the dark about his health status beyond what his doctor released publicly. While he seemed short of breath at times on Monday night, people said he

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