House collapses, record rains kill 15 in southern India

HYDERABAD, India (AP) — Record rains and heavy flooding in the southern Indian state of Telangana collapsed houses and killed at least 15 people, police said Wednesday.

Four other people were injured in Hyderabad, the state’s capital, when a house’s boundary wall fell on a neighboring house, which collapsed with the impact, police officer Gaja Bhopal Rao said.

The first house to collapse in Hyderabad was in a hilly area of the city where the soil was loosened by more than 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) of rain in the past 24 hours, said Police Commissioner Anjani Kumar. That left eight people dead.

Five other people were killed in two other house collapses in the city, Kumar said. Two other people were swept away by flood waters elsewhere in the state.


The rain washed away part of the highway linking the city to the airport.

Thirty cars and trucks were washed away when a lake in the city overflowed, district administrator Amoy Kumar said.

The heavy rain in Hyderabad, caused by a deep

Read more

8 dead as house collapses amid record rain in southern India

HYDERABAD, India — A house collapsed in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad amid record rains and heavy flooding, killing at least eight people, police said Wednesday.

In addition to the dead, another four people were hospitalized after a farmhouse’s boundary wall fell on a neighboring house, which collapsed with the impact, said police officer Gaja Bhopal Rao.

The house was in a hilly area of the city where the soil was loosened by more than 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) of rain in the past 24 hours, said Police Commissioner Anjani Kumar.

The heavy rain in Hyderabad, caused by a deep depression in Bay of Bengal, broke a record set 20 years ago. It caused flooding in low lying areas of the city, where authorities used boats to evacuate people.

More than 9.6 million people across South Asia have been affected by severe floods this year, with hundreds of thousands struggling to get food and medicine.

About 550 people have died in India, Bangladesh and Nepal, while millions have been displaced from their homes since the flooding began in June.

rn{% endblock %}"},"start":"https://users.startribune.com/placement/1/environment/3/limit-signup-optimizely/start"},{"id":"limit-signup","count":12,"action":"ignore","mute":true,"action_config":{"template":"{% extends "grid" %}rnrn{% block heading_text %}Youu2019ve read your 10 free articles for this 30 day period. Sign up now for local coverage you wonu2019t find anywhere else, special sections and your favorite columnists. StarTribune puts Minnesota and the world right at your fingertips. {% endblock %}rnrn{% block last %}rn{{ parent() }}rn{# limit Krux pixel from https://www.squishlist.com/strib/customshop/328/ #}rnrn

Read more

Coronavirus live news: WHO daily cases set new record at more than 350,000 | World news





Trump again calls for in-person debate, citing doctor’s letter

Updated





What we know so far: Trump expected to return to public engagements on Saturday

Updated





Donald Trump added more turbulence on Thursday to the US presidential race by refusing to participate in the next presidential debate with Joe Biden after it was changed to a virtual event to guard against the spread of Covid-19, prompting both campaigns to propose postponing it a week.

On Thursday morning, the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) said that the next presidential debate, due on 15 October, would be a virtual affair, with the candidates appearing remotely.

“In order to protect the health and safety of all, the second presidential debate will take the form of a town meeting, in which the candidates would participate from separate remote locations,” it said.

But Trump, who was hospitalized for three days after disclosing last Friday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, blasted the format change announced by the nonpartisan commission in charge of the debates and expressed concern that his microphone could be cut off at the event:

Read more

Coronavirus live news: doctor clears Trump to return to public events on Saturday; record global case rise | World news





Trump again calls for in-person debate, citing doctor’s letter

Updated





What we know so far: Trump expected to return to public engagements on Saturday

Updated





Donald Trump added more turbulence on Thursday to the US presidential race by refusing to participate in the next presidential debate with Joe Biden after it was changed to a virtual event to guard against the spread of Covid-19, prompting both campaigns to propose postponing it a week.

On Thursday morning, the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) said that the next presidential debate, due on 15 October, would be a virtual affair, with the candidates appearing remotely.

“In order to protect the health and safety of all, the second presidential debate will take the form of a town meeting, in which the candidates would participate from separate remote locations,” it said.

But Trump, who was hospitalized for three days after disclosing last Friday that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, blasted the format change announced by the nonpartisan commission in charge of the debates and expressed concern that his microphone could be cut off at the event:

Read more

Coronavirus live news: record global case rise; Washington health officials ask Rose Garden guests to get tested | World news













Trump doctor says he anticipates president’s ‘return to public engagements’ on Saturday

Updated





Washington warns those at White House super-spreader event

In an extraordinary step, the Washington, DC, Department of Health has released an open letter appealing to all White House staff and anyone who attended a September 26 event in the Rose Garden and inside the building to mark the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the supreme court to seek medical advice and take a Covid-19 test.

The letter indicates a lack of confidence in the White House medical team’s own contact tracing efforts regarding an ongoing virus outbreak that has infected Donald Trump, multiple senior staff members and two US senators, among others, The Associated Press writes.

Co-signed by nine other local health departments from neighboring jurisdictions in Maryland and Virginia, the letter flatly states a belief that contact tracing on the outbreak has been insufficient.

It says the public appeal is based on, “our preliminary understanding that there has been limited contact tracing performed to date, there may be other staff and residents at risk for exposure to Covid positive individuals.”

It asks all White House employees, anyone who attended the Sept. 26 event and anyone who may have been in contact with those people to “contact your local health department for further guidance/questions regarding your potential need to quarantine.”

The letter represents a rising level of concern and a clear shift in strategy by Mayor Muriel Bowser’s government, which had previously remained publicly hands-off and said it trusted the White House’s robust medical operation to handle its own contact tracing and follow-up.





Summary

Read more

Fairfield council questions SLO CA police chief’s record

Soon-to-be former San Luis Obispo Police Chief Deanna Cantrell is facing scrutiny in Fairfield, just weeks before starting her new job — over her lost gun incident and the department’s handling of Black Lives Matter protests.

According to the Daily Republic newspaper in Solano County, two members of the Fairfield City Council raised concerns at a meeting Sept. 15 about Cantrell’s handling of the weapons incident, noting they received calls from city residents on the issue.

“I think we will have a better sense of the police chief when we meet her,” Vice Mayor Pam Bertani told the Daily Republic. “I have never talked to her or met her. … I think her presence will make a difference.”

Prior to her resignation from her post as head of San Luis Obispo Police Department in August, Cantrell was the subject of some high-profile local incidents.

In July 2019, she left her gun in an El Pollo Loco bathroom in San Luis Obispo. The follow-up search for her missing weapon led to an investigation and arrest of an unrelated suspect.

Fairfield Councilwoman Catherine Moy said at the Sept. meeting that she wanted to hear more from Cantrell on the gun incident and the subsequent investigation.

“My concern is the arrest of a person who did not at all look like the person who they believed took (the gun), and they got him for something else,” Moy said in the Daily Republic article. “I believe that is a violation of his civil rights.”

At the meeting, Cantrell was also criticized for the handling of Black Lives Matter protests in San Luis Obispo.

During as march in June, the San Luis Obispo Police Department fired tear gas at protesters. The department later arrested activist Tianna Arata and asked the district attorney to file eight criminal charges against her for leading a separate July protest.

According to the Daily Republic, Fairfield city manager Stefan Chatwin, who was responsible for hiring Cantrell, said he stood behind his decision, noting Cantrell was the clear favorite for the position after community, professional and staff panel interviews of the top candidates.

Cantrell began the recruitment process for the Fairfield chief job in May. Her last day with the San Luis Obispo Police Department will be Sept. 30.

Related stories from San Luis Obispo Tribune

Kaytlyn Leslie writes about business and development for The San Luis Obispo Tribune. Hailing from Nipomo, she also covers city governments and happenings in the South County region, including Arroyo Grande, Pismo Beach and Grover Beach. She joined The Tribune in 2013 after graduating from Cal Poly with her journalism degree.

Source Article

Read more

A Record Number of Women Are Running for House in 2020 | America 2020

A record number of female nominees are running for the House in the 2020 general elections, exceeding the historic number set in the 2018 midterms that brought in a wave of women – mostly Democrats – to Congress and switched party control.

With the conclusion of the regular 2020 primary season following Tuesday’s primaries in Delaware, 298 women advanced to general elections with a large majority of them running as Democrats, according to an analysis by the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. Of the total number of female House nominees, 204 are Democrats, while 94 are Republicans, with both parties shattering their previous records. The number, however, could slightly grow with a few remaining primaries happening on Election Day.

Political Cartoons on Congress

It’s a sizable uptick from 2018 when there were record-high numbers of women seeking House seats with 234 nominees. The number of female nominees in 2020 is likely to again bolster the ranks of women serving in Congress which has historically been overwhelmingly run by men despite women representing more than half the U.S. population. There are a number of female nominees, however, who will face steep hurdles in November since they’re running in districts that are considered swing seats or ones that dramatically tilt towards one party.

Women played a pivotal role in delivering Democrats control of the House in 2018 for the first time in eight years. Two years ago, Democrats had a record-high of 182 female nominees running for Congress.

And in 2020, a historic number of at least 130 Black women ran for the House and Senate, according to the Center for American Women and Politics. The record number of Black candidates, who are largely Democrats, are running at a time when the country faces a reckoning over race and ongoing protests around the country against police brutality and systemic racism.

Republican women, meanwhile, have seen their numbers dwindle in recent years. There are only 13 women currently in the House GOP conference since a handful of incumbents lost to Democratic candidates two years ago.

But House Republicans made a significant push to recruit a record number of female candidates, though they still face challenges – particularly financial – when trying to navigate and win contested primaries. This year, the GOP surpassed its previous record of female House nominees which was 53 in 2004, according to the Center for American Women and Politics.

Women fell just short of the 2018 record set in the Senate, which had 23 nominees. This year, there are 20 female nominees for the Senate: 12 Democrats and eight Republicans. The current composition of women in the upper chamber includes nine Republicans and 17 Democrats.

The number could again change after Georgia’s special election for the Senate on Nov. 3. Republican Sen. Kelly Loeffler, who was appointed to former Sen. Johnny Isakson’s seat last year, is running for a full term and competing in a jungle primary which will feature all Senate candidates regardless

Read more

White House says reducing record debt will be ‘big second-term priority’ for Trump

The White House on Wednesday said that reducing the nation’s record debt will be a second-term priority for President Trump.



a woman in a blue shirt: White House says reducing record debt will be 'big second-term priority' for Trump


© Getty
White House says reducing record debt will be ‘big second-term priority’ for Trump

Asked about Congressional Budget Office projections that the annual deficit will reach $3.3 trillion by the end of the fiscal year this month, White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said Wednesday “the debt is a big second-term priority” for President Trump.

Loading...

Load Error

“We believe unprecedented growth will go a long way in solving the problem but it is certainly a second-term priority,” she said, echoing promises Trump made in 2016 and in the early days of his presidency.

The annual deficit this year is projected to reach an unprecedented level that dwarfs the record $1.4 trillion deficit from 2009.

The accumulated debt is on track to surpass the size of the entire economy next year for the first time since World War II, and breach its all-time record in the coming years.

On the 2016 campaign trail, Trump promised to wipe out the nation’s debt altogether over the course of his presidency.

The primary tool for doing that, he said, would be to juice the economy, producing unprecedented, consistent annual growth rates upwards of 3, 4, 5, even 6 percent to bring revenues up and dwarf the debt, which is frequently measured in comparison to the size of the economy.

But the unprecedented growth failed to materialize, never reaching 3 percent over the course of a full calendar year.

Instead, the GOP’s unfunded tax cuts added a projected $1.9 trillion to deficits over the course of a decade, even after accounting for their effects on economic growth.

At the same time, Trump insisted on supercharging the level of defense spending, and agreed to Democratic demands for similarly large increases in domestic spending.

Annual deficits jumped from $587 billion in 2016 to just shy of $1 trillion in 2019, an increase of two-thirds. Economists say periods of economic growth should be used to pay down debts and prepare for a rainy day.

The precipitous increase in the deficit since last year, however, is largely due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the unprecedented level of fiscal response that kept the economy from collapsing during a period of lockdowns.

Top economic officials including Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell say that a strong fiscal response is key to supporting a robust economic recovery.

Many fiscal hawks acknowledge that the debt should be tackled only after the crisis abates, but warn that it will be a serious and difficult undertaking when it does, involving some combination of tax increases and spending cuts.

Morgan Chalfant contributed.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Read more

China’s exports jump amid Covid-19 recovery; UK house prices hit record – business live | Business





1,100 jobs to go at Pizza Express









House prices jump: what the experts say

Read more