Garden of the Gods receives donation for park advancement | Colorado Springs News

Improvements to the Garden of the Gods are on the horizon after the park received a hefty donation earlier in September, a city news release announced Wednesday.

The Garden of the Gods Foundation, a local nonprofit that oversees the betterment of the park by collecting money and distributing it to support the park’s needs, gave $367,826 to enhance public safety, visitor experience and restroom construction.

“This is such a great example of community organizations working together toward a common goal, which in this case, is enhancing and protecting Garden of the Gods Park for the enjoyment of generations to come,” Karen Palus, Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services director, said in the release.

A chunk of the donation, $102,000, will go toward the park ranger program such as staff salaries, John Stark, the parks manager said.

Park rangers are key to protecting the park and its environmental philosophy, Stark said, as well as providing educational programming and services for visitors.

Another portion of the donation will go toward restroom construction within the park, Stark said, although more fundraising is needed before construction can begin.

A bulk of funding came from the Garden of the Gods Visitor & Nature Center, including money generated from the park gift shop and café, Stark said.

The visitors center was shut down from mid-March through May because of the coronavirus pandemic, but reopened to the public in June.

Despite the temporary closure, the nonprofit was still able to give back.

“We’re really fortunate to have the relationships with the Garden of the Gods Foundation,” Stark said. “They’re just such wonderful partners for the city.”

 

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NTEC Receives Highest Honor for Exemplary Mining and Reclamation from US Department of Interior

NTEC chose to rework marginal, legacy reclamation sites to create a stable landscape, ultimately allowing the land to be returned better than they found it

FARMINGTON, N.M., Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Today, the US Department of Interior’s Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) recognized Navajo Transitional Energy Company (NTEC) for their exemplary mining and reclamation work at the Navajo Mine. OSMRE awarded NTEC the agencies highest honor for activities that went above and beyond reclamation requirements to achieve superior results.

NTEC is the steward of the nearly 33,000 acre Navajo Coal Mine on the Navajo Indian Reservation. Traditional piecemeal reclamation began at the mine in 1970. When NTEC, a Navajo-owned company, purchased the mine in 2013 they inherited failing reclamation and unstable landforms, much of which had already been relinquished from jurisdictional oversight. The company immediately saw an opportunity to go above and beyond to correct the situation and do more than required to create a stable, sustainable landscape that mimics the natural erosion and deposition process of the Southwest.

Specifically, one site had been reclaimed to the previous applicable standard and was unnaturally eroding, while another site was lacking soil to shape and fill the area. However, the existing site configuration didn’t allow equipment the access necessary to perform reclamation work. NTEC and Bisti Fuels (NTEC’s contract miner) applied a creative solution to remedy both situations and allow for a watershed reclamation method.

The limiting infrastructure included electric rail structures (necessary to move coal from the pit to the power plant) and a local access road. The Company removed electric rail overhead lines and purchased diesel locomotives, as well as relocated a portion of the road. The new road location served the dual purpose of providing locals safe passage during the weather events. The new configuration allowed NTEC to correct the erosion problems with one pit, minimize impacts to previous reclamation, and move soils for future reclamation. Combined, these extraordinary efforts allowed for a large-scale effort that mimics a natural watershed and creates a sustainable restoration landscape.

This effort and approach is above and beyond what is required. “We took a site that has already been released from jurisdiction by the agency, and put it back in, because we knew we could do it better—we wanted to leave things better than we found them,” said Clark Moseley, CEO. “Doing the right thing is one of NTEC’s core behaviors. We have an obligation to our shareholders, the Navajo People. Our reclamation efforts present an opportunity to step up, do the right thing, at the right time, and create a better landform than what is required.”

OSMRE Principal Deputy Director Lanny E. Erdos, along with NTEC and Navajo Nation leadership toured the reclamation site this morning. The tour was followed be an award ceremony. “It is with great pleasure that I am here today to present the Navajo Transitional Energy Company with the 2020 Excellence in Surface Coal Mining Reclamation Award,” said OSM

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Grandfather receives brutal note from neighbor about his ‘ridiculous’ house decorations

A grandfather recently received a vicious note from his neighbor that many people online are calling racist.

Earlier this week, Twitter user @goldenstef posted a picture of the letter saying: “Someone REALLY sent this to my grandpa…… my man is just trynna [sic] decorate his house and……. I f—ing hate people.”

The letter was signed by “the decent, middle-class people with Class of Thunderbird Hills sub-division,” but appears to have only been written by one person, who used the phrase “my wife and I” at the very beginning of the note. Thunderbird Hills is in San Antonio, Texas.

The letter writer begins by explaining that he and his wife occasionally walk around their neighborhood to exercise, but whenever they pass the grandfather’s place they see he has “yet another new decoration or ornament in front of your house.”

LONELY WIDOWER FLOODED WITH THOUSANDS OF MESSAGES FOLLOWING PLEAS FOR FRIENDSHIP

“Oh my God — Enough already,” the neighbor wrote. “All the people that we know in our neighborhood have commented on the EXCESSIVE decorations in front of your house — and am sorry to say, you’re [sic] house has become, and is, the laughing joke of the neighborhood.”

“Some of our friends have even purposely driven in front of your house just to see how RIDICULOUS all those decorations look like — and needless to say, they all laugh,” the neighbor added. “All those decorations are in ‘bad taste’ and only goes to prove to everyone that a ‘low class Mexican family’ lives there, or some Gypsy family.”

VIDEO SHOWS HEARTBREAKING MOMENT BOY HEARS DECEASED GRANDPA’S VOICE INSIDE STUFFED BEAR

The neighbor goes on to complain about the man’s “pot plants in the middle of the lawn.”

“Oh my God, where do you people come from?” the neighbor wrote. “It makes absolutely no sense to have ‘plants’ in the middle of the lawn. Also, do you realize that you have four or five American flags displayed in your front. Hello? Do you think that’s going to make people think you’re patriotic? Believe me, they will think like we do — at how Ridiculour [sic] that looks.”

“Apparently you people must have come here to our neighborhood from the deep West side or the deep South side where all the poor people with no class live,” the neighbor added. “Believe me when I tell you that your house is an EMBARRASSMENT to the neighborhood.”

LONELY WIDOWER POSTS SIGN IN WINDOW SEEKING FRIENDSHIP AMID PANDEMIC

To conclude the note, the neighbor recommended that the grandfather “start looking at the other houses around here and then take a look at your own house.”

“And then come to realize how ridiculous and embarrassing your excessive house decorations look to the rest of us,” the neighbor wrote.

Since the post went up, the tweet has had more than 237,000 likes, 39,800 retweets and 5,400 comments, with

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