8 dead as house collapses amid record rain in southern India

HYDERABAD, India — A house collapsed in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad amid record rains and heavy flooding, killing at least eight people, police said Wednesday.

In addition to the dead, another four people were hospitalized after a farmhouse’s boundary wall fell on a neighboring house, which collapsed with the impact, said police officer Gaja Bhopal Rao.

The house was in a hilly area of the city where the soil was loosened by more than 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) of rain in the past 24 hours, said Police Commissioner Anjani Kumar.

The heavy rain in Hyderabad, caused by a deep depression in Bay of Bengal, broke a record set 20 years ago. It caused flooding in low lying areas of the city, where authorities used boats to evacuate people.

More than 9.6 million people across South Asia have been affected by severe floods this year, with hundreds of thousands struggling to get food and medicine.

About 550 people have died in India, Bangladesh and Nepal, while millions have been displaced from their homes since the flooding began in June.

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Swift response, help from rain put out fast-moving grass fire

A prompt response from the Goshen Fire District and a timely assist from Mother Nature in the form of torrential rain helped stop a fast-moving grass fire that prompted a Level 3 evacuation order Wednesday.



Goshen Fire District firefighters work Wednesday to put out a grass fire off of Seavey Loop road near Goshen. Firefighters were able to contain the blaze relatively quickly and were assisted by torrential rain.


© Andy Nelson, The Register-Guard
Goshen Fire District firefighters work Wednesday to put out a grass fire off of Seavey Loop road near Goshen. Firefighters were able to contain the blaze relatively quickly and were assisted by torrential rain.

The fire call came in at at 5:15 p.m. for the 34900 block of Seavey Loop Road, according to the computer assisted dispatch (CAD).

The fire appeared to have started along Seavey Loop Road, with westerly winds spreading fire in dry grass. People in the area reported seeing flames as high as 40 feet.

The Level 3 “go now” evacuation  notice was issued a little after 6 p.m. for Garden Valley Road area from Garden Valley Road to Drummond Drive near Mt. Pisgah. Lane County canceled the evacuation order at about 6:45 p.m., telling residents they could return home.



a man that is on fire: Goshen Fire District firefighters work to put out a grass fire off of Seavey Loop road on Sept. 23, 2020, near Goshen, Oregon. Firefighters were able to contain the blaze relatively quickly and were assisted by torrential rain.


© Andy Nelson, The Register-Guard
Goshen Fire District firefighters work to put out a grass fire off of Seavey Loop road on Sept. 23, 2020, near Goshen, Oregon. Firefighters were able to contain the blaze relatively quickly and were assisted by torrential rain.

The scene was cleared a little after 8 p.m. Wednesday, according to dispatch records.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

This article originally appeared on Register-Guard: Swift response, help from rain put out fast-moving grass fire

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Homeowner shocked after heavy rain reveals secret buried under backyard garden

You never know what you’re going to find when you start digging.

A homeowner in Texas reportedly made an amazing discovery in the backyard of a house he originally intended to fix up and flip. After realizing what he owned, however, he’s apparently changed his mind.

John Reynolds reportedly had no idea that there was a pool in the backyard of the house he bought in Texas for just under $20,000.

John Reynolds reportedly had no idea that there was a pool in the backyard of the house he bought in Texas for just under $20,000.
(iStock)

John Reynolds had no idea that there was a pool in the backyard of the house he bought for just under $20,000, The Sun reports. According to him, the backyard was a mess and the pool had been filled with dirt and other debris.

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The house had reportedly been owned by a hoarder before Reynolds bought it. When he first took ownership of the house, it was full of junk, feral cats and the backyard appeared to contain an overgrown garden.

According to Reynolds, he didn’t know about the in-ground pool until a heavy downpour shifted the dirt and debris. Prior to that, he says the only thing he noticed was that one section of the backyard always seemed to be a bit “boggy.”

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“It feels like I have stumbled across a winning lottery ticket,” he told The Sun. “Never in a million years when I bought the property did I think I would be swimming in my own pool. I bought it as a bit of an investment with the intention to do it up and sell it on, but it has yielded so many surprises I don’t know if I can let it go.”

Reynolds reportedly bought the house two years ago but didn’t discover the pool until a few months later. He spent over a year cleaning out the garbage, fixing leaks, and making other repairs to the pool. While it cost him about $10,000 to fix it up, installing an in-ground pool would have been significantly more expensive.

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“My friends and I are in it every day for hours on end now,” says the now proud homeowner. “You couldn’t wish to find a bigger reward in your back garden.”

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Fitz’s Opinion: Waiting for rain and spiritual realignment in my garden | Local Editorials and Opinion

In case it rains I set out the buckets to catch the precious water.

I take cuttings from the massive euphorbias of Morocco. They resemble giant olive-green sea anemones. Models of thrift and adaptation to mirror. By 2050 we’ll need to possess the genes of a saguaro.

I collect seeds from the brittle bushes that in spring yielded daisy-like flowers.

Gethsemane is in every garden. Suffering and reassignment. I remove a shed and expose three tarantula burrows. Three furious tarantulas emerge, 24 eyes see each other and a three-way duel-to-the-death unfolds.

On the side of a barrel cactus I find a bird’s skeleton, wings outstretched, a crucified cactus wren, ensnared, a totem, a reminder to be careful when approaching a desert fruit.

A deer skull hangs over our hacienda’s back door, emblematic of the cycle that rules out here. Fixing the fence, I watch ants disintegrate a deceased kangaroo rat. We’re all just jackrabbits waiting to be pancaked into the asphalt. Vulture vittles.

Fence fixed, I look up to see red-faced vultures floating in the blue, patiently waiting for death to serve up their Daily Bread.

Over the kitchen window hangs this cartoonist’s favorite cartoon prop, an old scythe, an ode to the Grim Reaper. And to my uncle’s farm, where boyhood summers taught me to love turning earth. Beneath shade sails and shade trees, water conserved, the seasons and I have turned this earth, where drought-resistant life thrives, producing the weird beauty desert dwellers savor.

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