Saturday Kitchen chef James Martin has quit social media – here’s what happened

Monday, 5th October 2020, 1:30 pm

Updated Monday, 5th October 2020, 1:38 pm
The virtual cooking masterclass suffered from a host of technical difficulties (Photo: Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images)

Saturday Kitchen chef James Martin has quit social media after receiving backlash for his virtual cookalong event that was branded a “disaster” by attendees.

Sign up to our daily newsletter

The i newsletter cut through the noise

The This Morning chef says that he has been the target of “vile abuse” by those angry that they had experienced technical issues during the sold-out cooking masterclass.

What happened?

Martin held a virtual cookery class on Saturday 3 October, which invited fans and foodies to create a three course meal alongside Martin during the 90-minute experience.

The menu was set to consist of a start of halloumi with chilli jam, a main course of chicken saute with vinegar and pilaf rice, and a dessert of a raspberry tart.

Tickets for the event had launched at 10am on Friday 11 September, and cost cookery fans £35 for the virtual masterclass – not including the individual cost for ingredients.

However, many attendees were left frustrated after technical issues left their screens frozen or unable to connect to the event.

Some of those who attended the event called it “a chaotic shambles” and a “complete disaster”, with many commenting that Martin moved through the cooking instructions too quickly.

Others questioned if the event itself was even live, stating that it was “clearly pre-recorded”.

What has James Martin said?

Taking to Twitter, the chef explained that he would be taking a break from social media following the online abuse he received after the show.

In a thread of tweets, Martin wrote: “Having seen some of the comments posted online regarding last night’s cook along and the anger towards me given the technical issues that the production team were having, I would like to apologise again for this and I will be chasing up with Live Nation, the production company IT team and all the people they hired, to find out the problem.

“Having said that, this is a small comfort to some of you online who are quite rightly angry at me. I promise I will be speaking to them tomorrow, I wasn’t involved in the IT side of things and know little about it, but will get all the issues raised and sorted as much as I possibly can immediately.

“It’s unfortunate they didn’t use my team that makes the Saturday show to do this but, as you can imagine, it was all out of my hands.

“To the rest of you who had a good night, thank you, but due to the large amount of vile comments posted directly towards me, this will be my last post as I will be taking a break from posting personally and all social media for the foreseeable future.”

Online support

Following his announcement that he would be departing from social media, fans of the Saturday Kitchen

Read more

She quit her job for full time rooftop kitchen gardening : The Tribune India

Deepkamal Kaur

Tribune News Service

Jalandhar, September 28

Till a few months back, Vandana Walia Bali, a former scribe, was working at a private firm but she finally chose to quit her job and take to what had been her passion over the years.

Residing at Ekta Vihar Phase-II in Mithapur, this ardent nature lover is now not just growing her own seasonal vegetables, but also maize, lemons, mausami, loquat, amla, guava, narangi, mangoes and medicinal plants such as tulsi, aloe vera, ashwagandha, moringa, kadi patta and stevia – all on her rooftop and through an organic mode.

“We all need safe and fresh vegetables to stay healthy and build immunity, especially in the ongoing pandemic situation. But most of us do not have space to grow them. I have myself experimented and found that rooftop kitchen gardening can be the best solution since it gives a lot of space and allows plants to trap more sunlight. So, I am spreading this message across to everyone in my circle by frequently posting pictures of my harvest on the social media,” she said.

She shares more advantages, “This is also the safest and the shortest food chain as we just have to pluck the vegetables and bring them to the kitchen ourselves. So no extra hands touch these vegetables and hence no chance of any contamination.”

Bali shared her experience, “I have been growing vegetables for almost a year now on my terrace. I use soilless medium which is highly nutritive for the plants and light in weight for my roof. The plantation is done in portable farming systems made of high density polymer which is UV protected. They have a proper drainage system fitted in them, a frame on which we can install a green net to keep our vegetables safe from too much heat during summers or frost in the winter. I use drip irrigation system to water the plants and save about 75 per cent of water. While I am saving on water, I am also sure that my vegetables are completely free from pesticides and are 100 per cent safe.”

Now an entrepreneur running franchise centre for Jaipur-based company ‘The Living Greens’, she added, “During Covid, my terrace garden became a boon for me. I could feed my family with these fresh and safe vegetables even when there were no vendors coming. I also did not need to wash my vegetables with soda etc and keep them untouched for a day or so.”

Attempting to do some eco-friendly things, she has also been trying to make use of household waste as planters. Besides using bottles for setting up vertical planters, she has also used worn out tyres, old shoes, broken cups, etc as planters and decorated various corners of her living area quite aesthetically.

Source Article

Read more

Broadband, home office, garden: House buyers quit cities for home towns as remote working trend continuesworkig

House hunters are returning to their native counties as they turn their backs on city living and take advantage of remote working.

ew housing data show prices in the country’s regional towns have risen by almost 1pc in 12 weeks to €163,345, compared to less than 0.5pc experienced in bigger population centres. The average time to sell a property has fallen 30pc.

The trend confirms a change in buyer priorities for home-buying as the Covid pandemic has demonstrated that working from home is a viable option for tens of thousands of people.

The Irish Independent/ Real Estate Alliance (REA) Average House Price Index also shows that, nationwide, property prices continue to hold up.

The sale value of a three-bedroomed semi-detached house across the country has risen slightly – up by 0.6pc on average over the past three months to €236,046, a rise of 0.4pc compared to a year ago.

Close

Click to view full size image


Click to view full size image

Click to view full size image

A nationwide rush to buy has caused the average time taken to sell a property to tumble from 10 weeks in June to seven in September.

Buyers are expressly asking for homes based on broadband coverage, home office potential, and garden space rather than factors such as commuter-friendliness and transport links, which have previously dominated.

“Maybe one in five purchases is from people cashing in on their sales in Dublin and moving to larger houses down the country. People are making life-changing decisions to be based down the country,” said Harry Sothern, of REA Sothern in Carlow.

In a busy last period, REA Dawson in Tullow also reports selling a number of houses to clients who are now planning to work from home.

“It is clear that broadband is absolutely key for buyers and good amenities and space have become more important than transport links and commuting time,” said REA spokesperson Barry McDonald.

In Leitrim, property is now selling within five weeks of coming on the market.

REA agent Joe Brady is seeing clients buy in Leitrim with the intention of spending a maximum two days a week working in Dublin, a two-hour train journey away.

Properties with home office potential are being snapped up around the country, with REA Seamus Carthy in Roscommon having 43 potential buyers on a waiting list for homes with garden space priced between €350,000 and €500,000.

“All of the buyers are families who are either moving home or have decided to move out of bigger urban locations in search of more space and a better quality of life,” he said.

“We have also seen a resurgence in demand in coastal areas such as west Cork, Kerry, Waterford and Donegal as ­people realise that holiday homes can be more permanent.”

Meanwhile estate agents in the big cities and regions alike are reporting both a rush to buy and a reluctance to sell that is causing concern over market distortion.

In the cities, buyers are also anxious to conclude deals, but for different reasons.

Read more

Broadband, home office, garden: House buyers quit cities for home towns as remote working trend continues

House hunters are returning to their native counties as they turn their backs on city living and take advantage of remote working.

ew housing data show prices in the country’s regional towns have risen by almost 1pc in 12 weeks to €163,345, compared to less than 0.5pc experienced in bigger population centres. The average time to sell a property has fallen 30pc.

The trend confirms a change in buyer priorities for home-buying as the Covid pandemic has demonstrated that working from home is a viable option for tens of thousands of people.

The Irish Independent/ Real Estate Alliance (REA) Average House Price Index also shows that, nationwide, property prices continue to hold up.

The sale value of a three-bedroomed semi-detached house across the country has risen slightly – up by 0.6pc on average over the past three months to €236,046, a rise of 0.4pc compared to a year ago.

Close

Click to view full size image


Click to view full size image

Click to view full size image

A nationwide rush to buy has caused the average time taken to sell a property to tumble from 10 weeks in June to seven in September.

Buyers are expressly asking for homes based on broadband coverage, home office potential, and garden space rather than factors such as commuter-friendliness and transport links, which have previously dominated.

“Maybe one in five purchases is from people cashing in on their sales in Dublin and moving to larger houses down the country. People are making life-changing decisions to be based down the country,” said Harry Sothern, of REA Sothern in Carlow.

In a busy last period, REA Dawson in Tullow also reports selling a number of houses to clients who are now planning to work from home.

“It is clear that broadband is absolutely key for buyers and good amenities and space have become more important than transport links and commuting time,” said REA spokesperson Barry McDonald.

In Leitrim, property is now selling within five weeks of coming on the market.

REA agent Joe Brady is seeing clients buy in Leitrim with the intention of spending a maximum two days a week working in Dublin, a two-hour train journey away.

Properties with home office potential are being snapped up around the country, with REA Seamus Carthy in Roscommon having 43 potential buyers on a waiting list for homes with garden space priced between €350,000 and €500,000.

“All of the buyers are families who are either moving home or have decided to move out of bigger urban locations in search of more space and a better quality of life,” he said.

“We have also seen a resurgence in demand in coastal areas such as west Cork, Kerry, Waterford and Donegal as ­people realise that holiday homes can be more permanent.”

Meanwhile estate agents in the big cities and regions alike are reporting both a rush to buy and a reluctance to sell that is causing concern over market distortion.

In the cities, buyers are also anxious to conclude deals, but for different reasons.

Read more