Someone stole historic 1800s graveyard gate in Gibraltar, put it in their yard with Halloween decor



a close up of a flower garden: Halloween gate


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Halloween gate

Gibraltar put out a call for help, and then a thank-you when a historic graveyard gate dating back to the 1800s went missing from a city cemetery?

So, who stole or “borrowed” the cemetery gate?

Turns out it wasn’t a prank, it was a city resident looking to, ahem, spruce up their Halloween yard display with something, shall we say, authentic.

Police said the historic gate was recovered after a tip from a resident came in when the police asked for help on social media.

Gibraltar’s police chief Matthew Lawyer told the News-Herald that officers went to an address on Rose Street near Bayview and spotted the portion of missing gate.

“It was located in a resident’s front lawn with their Halloween decorations,” the police chief said.

So far, no tickets, arrests or charges have been made. “We haven’t made contact with the resident yet. Officers knocked on the door, but there was no answer.”

The missing gate drew 245 reactions in small town Gibraltar from residents who were delighted at its return.

Sandra Kurtyka wrote on Facebook, “Glad you got it back. Knew they had to take it for decoration. Surprised it was someone from the city tho. Not too bright.”

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Boris Johnson’s 95% mortgages will put Britain back on course for a house price crash | Josh Ryan-Collins | Opinion

This week Boris Johnson boasted that his government would “turn generation rent into generation buy” via a return to 95% mortgages for first-time buyers. In other words, easier credit to help more people buy houses.

To say we have been here before would be an understatement of epic proportions. Since the days of Margaret Thatcher, every UK government has sought to cut through the housing affordability problem with the easy and politically popular option of subsidising the demand for homeownership. Generally, this has taken the form of liberalising mortgage regulation or providing direct government subsidies for first-time buyers, most recently the various help-to-buy schemes. All have failed to bring down the price of homes.

More demand for homeownership leads to more more credit flowing into an inherently limited supply of homes. Most housing in the UK is provided at market rates by private landlords and private sector developers. These groups have no incentive to increase the supply of housing to match this increase in demand, since they generate their profits from increasing, not decreasing, prices.

The result, inevitably, is house price inflation. As result, homeownership for younger adults on middle incomes has halved in the UK in the last two decades. Similar outcomes have been seen in other advanced economies – more mortgage credit does not stimulate supply when the provision of housing is left to the market.

British politicians and policymakers seem unable to recognise these simple facts. Indeed, it took a massive financial crisis over a decade ago for politicians to allow the tightening of mortgage regulation in any significant way. Johnson may not be aware of the fact that there were quite a few 95% mortgages around leading up to the housing bubble that precipitated the UK’s 2007-9 banking crisis. The resulting economic catastrophe led to them being phased out. Along with other restrictions on borrowing, these policies helped dampen the growth of UK house prices and household debt (currently around 85% of GDP, down from a record 95% in 2009), although it has been increasing again in recent years.

One can only imagine the Bank of England’s reaction to Johnson’s announcement. The Bank has been carefully nurturing its post-crisis financial stability mandate and delicately implementing “macroprudential policy” powers to stifle excessive lending in the domestic and corporate real estate sector. Johnson clearly doesn’t see much value in such an approach when there are votes to be won.

The UK remains locked in a self-defeating “doom loop”: falling levels of homeownership lead governments to loosen mortgage regulation, resulting in increasing household debt and house prices, leading to a housing bubble and eventually a financial crisis, leading to stricter mortgage regulation, which is then blamed for falling homeownership and so on.

What then is the solution? Do the opposite of current policy. Reduce, rather than increase, the demand for homeownership, and in particular the demand for housing as a financial asset. Implement higher and fairer property or land value taxes that reduce unearned capital gains that generally

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Boris Johnson’s 95% mortgages will put Britain back on course for a house price crash

This week Boris Johnson boasted that his government would “turn generation rent into generation buy” via a return to 95% mortgages for first-time buyers. In other words, easier credit to help more people buy houses.



a person standing in front of a store: Photograph: Guy Bell/REX/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Guy Bell/REX/Shutterstock

To say we have been here before would be an understatement of epic proportions. Since the days of Margaret Thatcher, every UK government has sought to cut through the housing affordability problem with the easy and politically popular option of subsidising the demand for homeownership. Generally, this has taken the form of liberalising mortgage regulation or providing direct government subsidies for first-time buyers, most recently the various help-to-buy schemes. All have failed to bring down the price of homes.

More demand for homeownership leads to more more credit flowing into an inherently limited supply of homes. Most housing in the UK is provided at market rates by private landlords and private sector developers. These groups have no incentive to increase the supply of housing to match this increase in demand, since they generate their profits from increasing, not decreasing, prices.

Related: Lenders left wondering how PM’s homeowners pledge will be achieved

The result, inevitably, is house price inflation. As result, homeownership for younger adults on middle incomes has halved in the UK in the last two decades. Similar outcomes have been seen in other advanced economies – more mortgage credit does not stimulate supply when the provision of housing is left to the market.

British politicians and policymakers seem unable to recognise these simple facts. Indeed, it took a massive financial crisis over a decade ago for politicians to allow the tightening of mortgage regulation in any significant way. Johnson may not be aware of the fact that there were quite a few 95% mortgages around leading up to the housing bubble that precipitated the UK’s 2007-9 banking crisis. The resulting economic catastrophe led to them being phased out. Along with other restrictions on borrowing, these policies helped dampen the growth of UK house prices and household debt (currently around 85% of GDP, down from a record 95% in 2009), although it has been increasing again in recent years.



a person standing in front of a store: ‘Homeownership for younger adults on middle incomes has halved in the UK in the last two decades.’


© Photograph: Guy Bell/REX/Shutterstock
‘Homeownership for younger adults on middle incomes has halved in the UK in the last two decades.’

One can only imagine the Bank of England’s reaction to Johnson’s announcement. The Bank has been carefully nurturing its post-crisis financial stability mandate and delicately implementing “macroprudential policy” powers to stifle excessive lending in the domestic and corporate real estate sector. Johnson clearly doesn’t see much value in such an approach when there are votes to be won.

The UK remains locked in a self-defeating “doom loop”: falling levels of homeownership lead governments to loosen mortgage regulation, resulting in increasing household debt and house prices, leading to a housing bubble and eventually a financial crisis, leading to stricter mortgage regulation, which is then blamed for falling homeownership and so on.

What then is the solution? Do the

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The one way to make your home feel put together

If it were up to us, we’d spend ALL of our money on interior stuff. Bedside tables, wall art, silk bedding… we want it all! But sadly as things stand, we have to pay for stuff like, y’know, food, clothes and rent.

Which is why we’re keen to get all the expert advice about the small ways to make your home feel expensive and grown up, without having to spend a bomb. Whether it’s clearing the clutter or using symmetry in your home – now an interior designer has revealed the one thing you could introduce to make your space more ‘adult’.

make home feel put together interior designer

Oscar WongGetty Images

Speaking to MailOnline, Rebecca Snowden, interior style advisor at Furniture Choice, explains that bare walls and floors can make a space feel way less homely, and take away any character you might be trying to create.

Obviously when you rent, changing the wall colour isn’t always a possibility – but introducing a rug definitely is. “To completely transform your home from generic to grown up, introduce colour by painting over plain walls or adding a feature rug to your living area,” she explained

“There is no hard and fast rule when it comes to choosing colours, but try to work around any pieces of furniture you plan to hold onto for a while.”

We could be into this – cosy underfoot and elevating our design choices? Count us in!

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Relying on testing to ward off COVID put Trump White House at risk

(Reuters) – Early in the coronavirus pandemic, U.S. President Donald Trump put his faith in a toaster-sized machine that could spit out test results in a matter of minutes.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. President Donald Trump boards the Marine One helicopter to depart the White House and fly to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where it was announced he will stay for at least several days after testing positive for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., October 2, 2020. REUTERS/Leah Millis/File Photo

In late March, Trump hailed the launch of Abbott Laboratories’ ID NOW test at a Rose Garden event and embraced its widespread use at the White House to keep the deadly virus at bay. The president often skipped his own administration’s public health recommendations on mask wearing and social distancing, explaining that “everyone’s tested” around him using the Abbott device.

His strategy was no match for the virus.

The president announced Friday that both he and his wife, Melania, tested positive – news that raised questions about the health of other top U.S. officials and threw the final weeks of the presidential campaign into disarray. On Friday, Trump began an experimental treatment and checked in to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center as a precautionary measure, a White House official said.

“The reliance on a rapid test, with its limitations, unfortunately gave the White House and its staff a false sense of security that they were in control of the virus,” said William Schaffner, a professor of infectious diseases at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

“You cannot rely on that test to create a barrier between you and the virus,” he said, adding that people “have to wear masks, do social distancing and not go to all these rallies.”

While rapid tests can help contain the spread of a highly contagious virus, they were not designed to be used in isolation. A negative result merely captures a snapshot in time and doesn’t guard against infection soon after. And a person may be infectious for days before the amount of virus in their body registers positive on a test.

Krutika Kuppalli, an assistant professor and expert on infectious diseases at the Medical University of South Carolina, said not enough is known about how these rapid tests perform in people who are asymptomatic.

“Trump was playing with fire and it was really a matter of time before something like this was going to happen,” she said. “Even if Trump had been around someone who was sick, wearing a mask could have prevented him from getting the virus.”

The White House said in a statement Thursday that Trump “takes the health and safety of himself and everyone who works in support of him and the American people very seriously” and that the administration followed guidelines for limiting COVID-19 exposure to the greatest extent possible.

DOUBTERS AND DEFENDERS

An Abbott spokeswoman said the company’s ID NOW test

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These Fall “Christmas” Trees Will Convince You to Put Your Tree up Early

Fall just arrived, and now’s the perfect time to spook up your home with Halloween inflatables and giant skeletons. And while you might think it’s way too soon to deck out your home for the holidays, this popular new decor trend will make you want to put up your tree right now. Fall “Christmas” trees are exactly what their name implies—Christmas trees decorated with fall decor.



a living room filled with furniture and vase of flowers on a table: Featuring colorful autumn leaves, sunflowers, pumpkin ornaments, and cute scarecrows, fall "Christmas" trees will be a festive centerpiece all season long.


© @paigebrisco/ @tori_tawater – Instagram
Featuring colorful autumn leaves, sunflowers, pumpkin ornaments, and cute scarecrows, fall “Christmas” trees will be a festive centerpiece all season long.

Hundreds of posts on Instagram with #fallchristmastrees show a variety of trees (small and large) with autumn-themed decorations. Many of them feature colorful autumn leaves, bright sunflowers, orange pumpkin ornaments, and cute scarecrows. As with traditional trees, lots of the trees are topped with something festive like a large bow or a small bouquet of seasonal flowers. Instead of presents, some of the trees have more fall decor at their base, including hay bales and more pumpkins.

The best part? You can keep up your fall “Christmas” tree on display through Thanksgiving because autumn lasts until the end of November. And since you already have your artificial tree up, that’s one less task you’ll have for the holidays. All you have to do is take down the fall decorations to start decking out the tree for Christmas.

Need some help getting started on this festive decor trend? We’ve rounded up the best artificial Christmas trees and autumn decorations to make your very own fall “Christmas” tree. Happy autumn decorating!

Follow House Beautiful on Instagram.

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Fall “Christmas” Trees Will Convince You to Put Your Tree up Early

Fall just arrived, and now’s the perfect time to spook up your home with Halloween inflatables and giant skeletons. And while you might think it’s way too soon to deck out your home for the holidays, this popular new decor trend will make you want to put up your tree right now. Fall “Christmas” trees are exactly what their name implies—Christmas trees decorated with fall decor.

Hundreds of posts on Instagram with #fallchristmastrees show a variety of trees (small and large) with autumn-themed decorations. Many of them feature colorful autumn leaves, bright sunflowers, orange pumpkin ornaments, and cute scarecrows. As with traditional trees, lots of the trees are topped with something festive like a large bow or a small bouquet of seasonal flowers. Instead of presents, some of the trees have more fall decor at their base, including hay bales and more pumpkins.

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

The best part? You can keep up your fall “Christmas” tree on display through Thanksgiving because autumn lasts until the end of November. And since you already have your artificial tree up, that’s one less task you’ll have for the holidays. All you have to do is take down the fall decorations to start decking out the tree for Christmas.

Need some help getting started on this festive decor trend? We’ve rounded up the best artificial Christmas trees and autumn decorations to make your very own fall “Christmas” tree. Happy autumn decorating!

Follow House Beautiful on Instagram.

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5 easy Thanksgiving decor ideas that you can put up right now



a vase of flowers on a table: null


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We don’t think it’s ever too early to be thinking about Thanksgiving decor ideas – well actually July might be too early, but the end of September? Totally fine. Also, you’ll find that these ideas are perfect for Thanksgiving but they could go up in your home now as fall decor too. We have kept things really easy here, just quick and effective looks that won’t have you crafting all weekend to achieve – most of these could easily be done in under an hour.

So keep scrolling if you want to feel just ever so slightly festive and for more fall decor ideas head over to our gallery. 

1. Hunt in your own garden for Thanksgiving decor

It doesn’t get easier than going into your back yard and finding a load of leaves and branches to bring inside and whack them in a jar. So effective though!  Pop a vase of foliage anywhere in your home to add some fall vibes and subtle Thanksgiving decor.

2. Adorn your home with foliage 

A  similar Thanksgiving decor idea, just taking it a bit further. You could use your back yard findings to create garlands that you can hang over pictures, fireplaces or mirrors. You can buy really realistic garlands too if you aren’t blessed with a load of nature on your door step. And once Thanksgiving is over, add some berries and some holly and you can take this elegant look all the way up to Christmas.

3. Give your porch a subtle seasonal makeover 

Porches come into their own during fall and Thanksgiving and this year. It doesn’t take much effort to turn your porch into a hommage to fall either, just use the pumpkins left over from Halloween to decorate the steps, add some candles and if you are feeling really extra you could add corn stalks and hay bales. 

4. Or just make a very easy fall wreath

And if you just want to add some subtle Thanksgiving decor to your front door, this asymmetric wreath would be really easy to make yourself. Create the shape using a flexible wood like wicker or willow – you could again find something in your garden – and the weave in leaves and dried flowers.  

5. Decorate your table 

Sure, we might not be throwing the Thanksgiving dinners of 2019 but you can still decorate your table for you and your family. This might look like an impressive set up but it’s really simple to recreate – start by laying down sprigs of eucalyptus (you can use any greenery but we live the contemporary look of eucalyptus) and then dot in some pumpkins and some candlesticks. For all the fall feels and more decor ideas check out  @the_canary_cottage on Instagram. 

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Swift response, help from rain put out fast-moving grass fire

A prompt response from the Goshen Fire District and a timely assist from Mother Nature in the form of torrential rain helped stop a fast-moving grass fire that prompted a Level 3 evacuation order Wednesday.



Goshen Fire District firefighters work Wednesday to put out a grass fire off of Seavey Loop road near Goshen. Firefighters were able to contain the blaze relatively quickly and were assisted by torrential rain.


© Andy Nelson, The Register-Guard
Goshen Fire District firefighters work Wednesday to put out a grass fire off of Seavey Loop road near Goshen. Firefighters were able to contain the blaze relatively quickly and were assisted by torrential rain.

The fire call came in at at 5:15 p.m. for the 34900 block of Seavey Loop Road, according to the computer assisted dispatch (CAD).

The fire appeared to have started along Seavey Loop Road, with westerly winds spreading fire in dry grass. People in the area reported seeing flames as high as 40 feet.

The Level 3 “go now” evacuation  notice was issued a little after 6 p.m. for Garden Valley Road area from Garden Valley Road to Drummond Drive near Mt. Pisgah. Lane County canceled the evacuation order at about 6:45 p.m., telling residents they could return home.



a man that is on fire: Goshen Fire District firefighters work to put out a grass fire off of Seavey Loop road on Sept. 23, 2020, near Goshen, Oregon. Firefighters were able to contain the blaze relatively quickly and were assisted by torrential rain.


© Andy Nelson, The Register-Guard
Goshen Fire District firefighters work to put out a grass fire off of Seavey Loop road on Sept. 23, 2020, near Goshen, Oregon. Firefighters were able to contain the blaze relatively quickly and were assisted by torrential rain.

The scene was cleared a little after 8 p.m. Wednesday, according to dispatch records.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

This article originally appeared on Register-Guard: Swift response, help from rain put out fast-moving grass fire

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New ‘virtual kitchen’ startup aims to put idle kitchens to use for delivery

The former boss of Q-Park and B&Q in Ireland has launched a ‘virtual kitchen’ startup to put under-utilised commercial kitchen space to use for deliveries.

Virtual kitchens, also known as dark or ghost kitchens, use cooking spaces or off-site kitchens to prepare food strictly for delivery, often under a dedicated online brand.

Zimbly Eat was co-founded by Mark Howard, a former managing director of Q-Park Ireland and general manager of B&Q. He said the startup has signed up five restaurants in Bray for the initial launch, with Malahide to follow in the coming weeks.

This food delivery model has attracted much attention from investors, with Peter Thiel’s Founders Fund last week leading a $20m (€16.9m) round in Virtual Kitchen, while former Uber chief Travis Kalanick founded CloudKitchens, backed by Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund.

Howard said the model can create a separate revenue stream for restaurants by preparing pre-ordered ready meals and dishes under Zimbly Eat’s brands during quiet periods.

“It is the early part of the week when they’re totally underutilised. From our conversations, they run even less than 40pc on those days, so there’s absolutely plenty of scope,” he said.

Zimbly Eat has partnered with Danish delivery startup Doorhub for logistics. Doorhub country manager Leanne Purcell said it will be working with the company on expanding in the rest of Ireland and “hopefully into the UK soon afterwards because we’ve just launched in the UK ourselves”.

It will face stiff competition in the Irish market from delivery giants like Just Eat and Deliveroo, but Howard said there’s space to carve out a niche.

“Because it’s our brand, we will do active marketing on behalf of the clients under the Zimbly brand, whereas other aggregators wouldn’t do that.”

The company has received early-stage backing from UK investor Harish Pillai, who comes from a background in the oil industry.

Howard added that after gathering an initial customer base, the “next step is going to investors and start raising some funds”.

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