PRIDE Centric Resources Re-Launches The Kitchen Spot

Shifting focus, PRIDE adjusted the strategy behind this robust website, focusing less on individual product transactions but instead on providing the connection to dealers. The exclusive dealer locator tool gives end-users access to a multitude of desired brands, foodservice specialties, and customer service capabilities.

“The PRIDE dealers are uniquely positioned to provide precise solutions and exceptional customer service to commercial kitchen operators looking for assistance to elevate their operations,” says Karin Sugarman, CEO at PRIDE Centric Resources.

The benefits of The Kitchen Spot include:

  • Connecting end users with nearly 100 restaurant dealers that offer tailored solutions
  • Access to a variety of restaurant design and build specialists
  • Connecting end users with an expert locally
  • Access to over 100 of the top foodservice brands
  • Library of helpful content for foodservice operators

For more information on The Kitchen Spot, visit www.thekitchenspot.com.  

About PRIDE Centric Resources: PRIDE focuses on providing robust resources for foodservice equipment and supply dealers, including marketing, financial, training and information technology. PRIDE offers best-in-class services and programs, and continuously strives for progressive and unique offerings to benefit their dealers’ future success.

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Tokyo opens Olympics Pride House

Tokyo on Sunday opened its first major community hub for LGBTQ people this month, part of a pre-Olympics project that campaigners hope will tackle stigma and raise awareness of discrimination.

Pride House Tokyo is based on similar inclusive pop-up sites set up at past Olympics, but will offer a permanent meeting space and information centre, seeking to educate the public about sexual diversity and offer refuge to those suffering harassment or discrimination.

While Japan has some protections for sexual minorities, it remains the only G7 country that does not recognise same-sex unions, and many couples say they can struggle to rent apartments together and are even barred from hospital visits.

Those challenges mean spaces like Pride House, set up in coordination with Tokyo 2020 Olympic organisers, are sorely needed in Japan, activists say.

“Japan, not just in sporting circles but society as a whole — including schools and workplaces — is not friendly to LGBTQ people, and it is hard to come out,” Gon Matsunaka, who heads the project behind Pride House, told AFP.

While the centre is being set up under a recent Olympic tradition, the project is officially named “Pride House Tokyo Legacy”, and activists hope its influence will extend beyond the Games. 

The venue “will be a landmark that could change the landscape for LGBTQ people in Japanese society,” Matsunaka said.

The International Olympic Committee echoed hopes for a lasting legacy.

“In sport, we are all equal,” IOC President Thomas Bach said in a statement released Sunday.

“We therefore welcome that Tokyo 2020 has embedded diversity and inclusion in the Olympic Games model,” he said, wishing “the Pride House Tokyo success”.

– ‘Unthinkable to come out’ –

The first Pride House — inspired by the tradition of Olympic hospitality centres for national teams — was launched at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Games.

Temporary venues have since appeared at London 2012 and Rio 2016, and at other international sporting events like the Commonwealth Games.

In 2014, Russian authorities denied a request to open a Pride House at the Sochi Winter Games, the organisation said. Instead, remote spaces were set up internationally for LGBTQ fans to gather.

Those involved in setting up the Tokyo Pride House include Fumino Sugiyama, a former athlete who was on the national women’s fencing team before coming out as a transgender man.

“When I was fencing, it was unthinkable to come out in the sports community, which was particularly homophobic,” said Sugiyama, 39.

“I faced a dilemma between trying to do the sport I love, where I can’t be myself, or trying to be myself and having to stop fencing,” he said.

While there are now several openly gay top sportspeople worldwide, from US women’s soccer star Megan Rapinoe to British Olympic diver Tom Daley, “not a single top athlete has come out” in Japan, he said.

Some local governments, employers and universities in Japan have taken gradual steps in recent years to expand protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender citizens.

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Tokyo highlights LGBTQ rights before Olympics with Pride House

TOKYO – Tokyo will open Pride House, Japan’s first permanent such center, next month to raise awareness of LGBTQ rights before and during the rearranged Olympic Games in 2021.

Although there have been similar initiatives before previous Games, organizers said Pride House Tokyo, which will open its doors on International Coming Out Day on October 11, is the first to get official International Olympic Committee backing.

“Pride House Tokyo aims to educate the world and also Japan of the difficulties the LGBTQ community has playing and enjoying sports … while helping create a safe space for the community too,” Pride House Tokyo said in a statement on Monday.

“Many people might think that Japan is a human rights defender, but actually there are no laws to protect LGBTQ people.”

Gon Matsunaka

It is traditional for most nations competing at the Olympics to have a hospitality “house,” where they promote their country and hold parties for winning athletes.

Gon Matsunaka, the head of Good Aging Yells, one of the organizations supporting the project, said Japan lags behind many other developed nations when it comes to LGBTQ rights.

“Many people might think that Japan is a human rights defender, but actually there are no laws to protect LGBTQ people,” Matsunaka told Reuters via email.

“Society is filled with prejudice, discrimination and harassment towards LGBTQ community.”

“While we have to change the sports arena, we also hope Pride House Legacy can help change society as a whole as well.”

Gay marriage is illegal in Japan and although about two dozen cities, towns and wards issue same-sex partnership certificates, they lack legal standing and prejudice persists.

Fumino Sugiyama, a transgender man and former fencer for the Japanese national team, said little had changed in 15 years since retiring from professional sport.

“Even now looking around, there are few LGBTQ athletes that live their lives openly and that is the reality here in Japan,” Sugiyama told a news briefing to launch Pride House Tokyo.

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Tokyo Highlights LGBTQ Rights Before Olympics With Pride House | World News

TOKYO (Reuters) – Tokyo will open Pride House, Japan’s first permanent such center, next month to raise awareness of LGBTQ rights before and during the rearranged Olympic Games in 2021.

Although there have been similar initiatives before previous Games, organizers said Pride House Tokyo, which will open its doors on International Coming Out Day on October 11, is the first to get official International Olympic Committee backing.

“Pride House Tokyo aims to educate the world and also Japan of the difficulties the LGBTQ community has playing and enjoying sports … while helping create a safe space for the community too,” Pride House Tokyo said in a statement on Monday.

It is traditional for most nations competing at the Olympics to have a hospitality ‘house’, where they promote their country and hold parties for winning athletes.

Gon Matsunaka, the head of Good Ageing Yells, one of the organizations supporting the project, said Japan lags behind many other developed nations when it comes to LGBTQ rights.

“Many people might think that Japan is a human rights defender, but actually there are no laws to protect LGBTQ people,” Matsunaka told Reuters via email.

“Society is filled with prejudice, discrimination and harassment towards LGBTQ community.”

“While we have to change the sports arena, we also hope Pride House Legacy can help change society as a whole as well.”

Gay marriage is illegal in Japan and although about two dozen cities, towns and wards issue same-sex partnership certificates, they lack legal standing and prejudice persists.

Fumino Sugiyama, a former fencer for the Japanese national team who now identifies as a man, said little had changed in 15 years since retiring from professional sport.

“Even now looking around, there are few LGBTQ athletes that live their lives openly and that is the reality here in Japan,” Sugiyama told a news briefing to launch Pride House Tokyo.

(Reporting by Jack Tarrant; Editing by Alexander Smith)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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