Kitchen safety, alarms key to fire prevention

Forty per cent of residential fires in Fort St. John over the past five years did not have working smoke alarms.

It’s an alarming statistic as firefighters mark Fire Prevention Week Oct. 4 to 10, put on by the Office of the Fire Commissioner and this year focused on kitchen safety.

Fire Prevention Officer Capt. Marco D’Agostino says the theme is highly relevant, with residents staying home due to the ongoing pandemic.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has kept many of us at home more often this year, so this year’s Fire Prevention Week of Serving Up Safety in the Kitchen is extremely relevant,” said D’Agostino, noting that smoke alarms are crucial for fire prevention.

The fire department has issued the following kitchen safety tips:

The department is celebrating Fire Prevention Week a little differently this year, serving up safety tips by producing their own video on kitchen safety. D’Agostino says the department has pushed their campaign to the digital sphere.

“This year is a little different with COVID, we didn’t do a kickoff, and we’re not going to the schools to do our talks. We still have publications and printed materials going out, but we did produce our own video,” he said. “It’s a way to get the message out there.”

The video can be found on the city’s website and YouTube page.

Email reporter Tom Summer at [email protected]

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Fire Prevention Week, “serve up fire safety in the kitchen”

This week is Fire Prevention Week, and this year’s campaign slogan is “serve up fire safety in the kitchen.”

The Kern County Fire Department is teaming up with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week for more than 90 years.

The campaign aims to educate everyone about simple but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe.

And according to NFPA cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries in the U.S.

KCFD wants to encourage all residents to embrace the 2020 Fire Prevention Week theme.

Safety tips to avoid starting a fire:

  • Never leave cooking food unattended.
  • Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, or boiling. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove.
  • If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.
  • You have to be alert when cooking. You won’t be alert if you are sleepy, have taken medicine or drugs, or consumed alcohol that makes you drowsy.
  • Always keep an oven mitt and pan lid nearby when you’re cooking. If a small grease fire starts, slide the lid over the pan to smother the flame. Turn off the burner, and leave the pan covered until it is completely cool.
  • Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.

To find out more about Fire Prevention Week programs and activities, visit the Kern County Fire Department website.

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Fire departments sounding the alarm on kitchen fires during annual Fire Prevention Week

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. – Smokey the Bear said, “Only you can prevent forest fires,” but he never said anything about kitchen fires – the leading cause of home fires across the United States.

“It only takes a second for something to go up in a big fire,” Art Kohn, with the Virginia Beach Fire Department, told News 3.

Kohn shared pictures showing the aftermath of a kitchen fire in Virginia Beach. Most of the charred ruins appeared to be near the stove, the walls and cabinetry were damaged and burned and parts of the ceiling came down.

“You don’t want to have that,” Kohn said. “You don’t want to experience that.”

This week, from October 4 to October 10, is Fire Prevention Week, a week-long observation to promote fire prevention and safety organized by the National Fire Protection Association. This year’s theme surrounds kitchen fires.

“Most, if not all, of these fires, are preventable,” Kohn said.

From 2014 to 2018, there were 550 deaths as a result of kitchen fires, according to Kohn and statistics from the NFPA. He added this number was greater than the number of similar deaths from 1980 to 1984.

“It’s a firefighter’s worst nightmare, to have to deliver news like that to a loved one,” Kohn said.

Most of those deaths are due to smoke inhalation, Kohn said. Kitchen fires also left more than 4,800 people injured in the same time period.

“Most of the injuries, the severe injuries that occur to people who are dealing with a kitchen fire, are because they tried to put it out themselves,” Kohn said.

So what can you do to make sure you don’t become a statistic? Kohn advised to not leave a stove on with the burners running unattended.

If you have to step away, Kohn suggested, “Take a wooden a spoon with you, maybe a plastic spatula that you have in the kitchen. You have something in your hand to remind you, ‘I’ve got food cooking in the oven.'”

He also suggested having a fire extinguisher nearby. For a pot on fire, the NFPA suggests to slide the lid on and turn off the heat, but do not move it.

Kohn also warned to never use water on a grease fire, as the water will actually spread the grease and risk expanding the fire.

If the situation is dire, Kohn said you should let the professionals handle the fire.

“Get out of the house, call 911,” Kohn said. “Let us do it.”

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Honolulu Fire Department Chief Manuel Neves gives kitchen safety tips for fire prevention week

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Fire Prevention Week focuses on safety in the kitchen

The Mount Prospect -based, nonprofit Illinois Fire Safety Alliance is promoting national Fire Prevention Week and this year’s campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!”

The campaign works to educate everyone about the simple but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

According to the National Fire Protection Association, cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries in the United States. Almost half (44%) of reported home fires started in the kitchen. Two-thirds (66%) of home cooking fires start with the ignition of food or other cooking materials.

“We know cooking fires can be prevented,” said Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice president of outreach and advocacy. “Staying in the kitchen, using a timer, and avoiding distractions such as electronics or TV are steps everyone can take to keep families safe in their homes.”

The IFSA encourages all Illinois residents to embrace the 2020 Fire Prevention Week theme.

“The most important step you should take before making a meal is to ‘Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen!'” said Fire Chief Jim Kreher, IFSA president. “A cooking fire can grow quickly. I have seen many homes damaged and people injured by fires that could easily have been prevented.”

Illinois Fire Safety Alliance wants to share safety tips to keep you from having a cooking fire:

• Never leave cooking food unattended. Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, or broiling. If you must leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

• Have a “kid-free zone” of at least three feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.

• Always keep an oven mitt and pan lid nearby when you’re cooking. If a small grease fire starts, slide the lid over the pan to smother the flame. Turn off the burner, and leave the pan covered until it is completely cool.

• If you are simmering, baking, roasting, or boiling food, check it regularly, remain in the home while food is cooking, and use a timer to remind you that you’re cooking.

• You have to be alert when cooking. You won’t be alert if you are sleepy, have taken medicine or drugs, or consumed alcohol that makes you drowsy.

The Illinois Fire Safety Alliance will be highlighting many more fire safety tips in support of this year’s Fire Prevention Week on its social media pages. To find out more about Fire Prevention Week and home fire safety tips, visit the following pages:

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

• IFSA Facebook: www.facebook.com/IllinoisFireSafetyAlliance

• IFSA Instagram: www.instagram.com/ilfiresafety

• IFSA Twitter: www.twitter.com/ILFireSafety

Since 1982, the Illinois Fire Safety Alliance, a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization, has been dedicated to fire safety and burn prevention throughout Illinois. The IFSA also hosts burn survivor support programs, including Camp “I Am Me,” a unique weeklong camp

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Sandy Hook Promise Celebrates Passage of Youth Suicide Prevention Legislation by the United States House of Representatives

Sandy Hook Promise Celebrates Passage of Youth Suicide Prevention Legislation by the United States House of Representatives

PR Newswire

NEWTOWN, Conn., Sept. 30, 2020

House of Representatives Votes Unanimously in Favor of the STANDUP Act (H.R. 7293)

NEWTOWN, Conn., Sept. 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Last night, the U.S. House of Representatives voted unanimously in favor of the Suicide Training and Awareness Nationally Delivered for Universal Prevention (STANDUP) Act of 2020. The bill encourages states to expand access to evidence-based suicide prevention training to students in grades 6 through 12.   

(PRNewsfoto/Sandy Hook Promise)
(PRNewsfoto/Sandy Hook Promise)

“I can’t think of a better way to recognize National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month than the House of Representatives voting to expand access to evidence-based suicide prevention programs for young people. It’s more important than ever to prioritize this kind of training,” said Mark Barden, co-founder and managing director of Sandy Hook Promise and father of Daniel, who was killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting. “We are deeply grateful to the bipartisan sponsors of the STANDUP Act—Representatives Scott Peters (D-CA), Gus Bilirakis (R-FL), Ted Deutch (D-FL) and Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA— who championed this life-saving legislation.”

“Teaching students and school personnel to understand and recognize signs of violent or suicidal ideation in youth and their peers is crucial to stem the crises of youth suicide and violence,” said Rep. Peters. “Early prevention can mean the difference between life or death, and giving schools the tools they need to prevent and react to threats before tragedy occurs ensures we are protecting our children and school safety.”

“There is no higher priority than keeping our children safe.  By providing high quality screening and prevention training to school staff and peers, we can identify threats before they materialize, and ensure that those who are at risk get the mental health treatment they need,” said Rep. Bilirakis.

In addition to the STANDUP Act, the House voted in favor of three other suicide prevention bills supported by Sandy Hook Promise to help prevent youth suicide:

  • Mental Health Services for Students Act (H.R. 1109), which would provide funding for public schools across the country to partner with local mental health professionals to establish on-site mental health care services for students;

  • Effective Suicide Screening and Assessment in the Emergency Department Act (H.R. 4861) which would assist emergency departments to develop better suicide risk protocols through the Department of Health and Human Services; and

  • Pursuing Equity in Mental Health Act of 2019 (H.R. 5469), the first comprehensive federal legislation to addresses increasing suicide rates and mental health disorders among Black youth by providing grants for culturally appropriate mental health services in schools and community settings.

In June, Arriana Gross, a high school junior in Covington, Georgia and a Sandy Hook Promise Youth Advisory Board member, spoke to members of the House Energy and Commerce Committee during a hearing on mental health about the importance of addressing teen suicide and mental wellness. In her testimony, Arriana asked the Committee to

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